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Carbon 07-10-2011 03:03 PM

Other than access during the cook?? (my assumption), what is the purpose of the detachable bottom? Or is it for easy cleanup?

H2OFowl 07-10-2011 05:09 PM

UDS draw question
 
1 Attachment(s)
Noticed today, windier than other days I've smoked, I had smoke return in my draw pipe.

Would a short smoke stack manage better than none?

coewar 07-11-2011 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by H2OFowl (Post 1704619)
Noticed today, windier than other days I've smoked, I had smoke return in my draw pipe.

Would a short smoke stack manage better than none?

Absolutely. Chimneys exist because they create negative pressure causing the air to flow up through them. I have a smoke stack that I can remove (and re-size) coming out the side. When I use the full length pipe, it's 24" and I can open other ports I have near the top and have nothing coming out of them. If I shorten that pipe but not putting the 24" extension on it, then the smoke will definitely start coming out the other ports on the barrel.

Joe Steel 07-11-2011 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carbon (Post 1704455)
Other than access during the cook?? (my assumption), what is the purpose of the detachable bottom? Or is it for easy cleanup?

I think the purpose is to use the bottom of the drum as the top to accommodate the Weber Kettle lid. That Weber Kettle lid will fit on the bottom of the drum (with the bottom cut off) -- but it wont fit on the top of the drum because of the rolled lip.

Carbon 07-11-2011 11:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joe Steel (Post 1705346)
I think the purpose is to use the bottom of the drum as the top to accommodate the Weber Kettle lid. That Weber Kettle lid will fit on the bottom of the drum (with the bottom cut off) -- but it wont fit on the top of the drum because of the rolled lip.

Thank you. That makes sense. So the drum is turned upside down and the stock drum lid at the bottom is sealed permanently.

H2OFowl 07-11-2011 01:36 PM

Thanks "coewar"

pman777 07-12-2011 09:24 AM

3 or 4 bolt mounts for cooking grate?
 
This is my first post on this thread and I apologize if this has been discussed. I'm trying to read all 549 pages but it takes a while.

Most every set of instructions seems to recommend 4 bolts or mounts to support the cooking grates. Why 4? Three would be easier and would not rock if they weren't perfect.

I've seen 3 used and suggested by a seemingly knowledgeable UDS maker on youtube and have seen pictures of at least one UDS in this thread with only 3 supports.

I've yet to see a discussion (I admit I'm only on page 75 here but reading more whenever I can) of the negatives of only 3 supports. Maybe the grate would be a bit less stable but I don't see how it would be.

Can someone tell me the negatives of only 3 supports?

Dave S 07-12-2011 04:15 PM

I don't see a downside to three bolts. I used three bolts and it does avoid the rocking that you could have if you used four bolts. Before someone jumps down my throat, I'm not saying your grate will rock if you use four bolts but the chances of it rocking are much better than if you used three. :-P

Quote:

Originally Posted by pman777 (Post 1706650)
This is my first post on this thread and I apologize if this has been discussed. I'm trying to read all 549 pages but it takes a while.

Most every set of instructions seems to recommend 4 bolts or mounts to support the cooking grates. Why 4? Three would be easier and would not rock if they weren't perfect.

I've seen 3 used and suggested by a seemingly knowledgeable UDS maker on youtube and have seen pictures of at least one UDS in this thread with only 3 supports.

I've yet to see a discussion (I admit I'm only on page 75 here but reading more whenever I can) of the negatives of only 3 supports. Maybe the grate would be a bit less stable but I don't see how it would be.

Can someone tell me the negatives of only 3 supports?


Carbon 07-12-2011 04:23 PM

With just 3 bolts the grate might lift at one end when applying heavy brush pressure when cleaning which is no biggie. You also need to be a little careful when loading and unloading food off the grate, making sure one side is not too heavy.
Having said that I plan on using just three bolts on my upcoming build.

fat_bastard 07-12-2011 04:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carbon (Post 1707258)
With just 3 bolts the grate might lift at one end when applying heavy brush pressure when cleaning which is no biggie. You also need to be a little careful when loading and unloading food off the grate, making sure one side is not too heavy.
Having said that I plan on using just three bolts on my upcoming build.

I have 3 in mine and never had a problem. I also remove the grate for cleaning. Not saying you won't have any problems either, just that I don't.

1FUNVET 07-12-2011 04:37 PM

3 works great on mine. I drew a line down the side and put vent holes and bolts inline.

Carbon 07-12-2011 04:40 PM

Three just seems more natural.

Randbo 07-12-2011 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pman777 (Post 1706650)
This is my first post on this thread and I apologize if this has been discussed. I'm trying to read all 549 pages but it takes a while.

Most every set of instructions seems to recommend 4 bolts or mounts to support the cooking grates. Why 4? Three would be easier and would not rock if they weren't perfect.

I've seen 3 used and suggested by a seemingly knowledgeable UDS maker on youtube and have seen pictures of at least one UDS in this thread with only 3 supports.

I've yet to see a discussion (I admit I'm only on page 75 here but reading more whenever I can) of the negatives of only 3 supports. Maybe the grate would be a bit less stable but I don't see how it would be.

Can someone tell me the negatives of only 3 supports?

If you plan to run heavy loads of meat and you get one of the flimsy grills you would see why some use four bolts.I have found two weights of grills. The cheap replacement grill at walmart and the genuine weber replacement grill. Then I find there are two different weights of original weber grills. depends on where you shop. Anyhow with a flimsy grill 4 bolts spread the load. If the bolts are not exactly even the grill lays down with a little weight on it. An example of a heavy load of meat would be 30 lbs. of pork shoulder on one grate. Some have gone beyound that. Build it to your needs.One of the greatest things about a UDS is the ability to change it as you go. Put a short bolt in a hole you no longer need to plug it and drill another one where you need it. HAVE FUN WITH YOUR BUILD. :thumb:

MushCreek 07-12-2011 05:34 PM

I use 3 U-bolts for my grates- slightly more support than 3 regular bolts, I guess. I use U-bolts because they are round, so I don't scrape myself reaching down to the fire basket, and I also use them to mount my fire basket when in the upper grilling position. I have 3 legs sticking out from the basket that rest on the lower set of U-bolts, and they each have a stud sticking down to fit into the U-bolt so it can't slide off. I use SS acorn nuts on the outside of the drum on the U-bolts for nice bling.

I just measured mine, and there is about 5" of grill outside of the straight line between U-bolts. It would be hard to get something heavy enough to tip the grill in that small space. It's never been an issue.

otis 07-12-2011 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MushCreek (Post 1707339)
I use 3 U-bolts for my grates- slightly more support than 3 regular bolts, I guess. I use U-bolts because they are round, so I don't scrape myself reaching down to the fire basket, and I also use them to mount my fire basket when in the upper grilling position. I have 3 legs sticking out from the basket that rest on the lower set of U-bolts, and they each have a stud sticking down to fit into the U-bolt so it can't slide off. I use SS acorn nuts on the outside of the drum on the U-bolts for nice bling.

I just measured mine, and there is about 5" of grill outside of the straight line between U-bolts. It would be hard to get something heavy enough to tip the grill in that small space. It's never been an issue.

Pics please?? I've been trying to get my head around how to make this work on my drum, also using the 3 ubolts. I'm thinking about flipping the charcoal basket over since my sides are so tall. I tried using just a length of metal rod between each of the ubolts. It held the grate, but not very securely. I'm looking for a way to make this work as a grill, along with being an awesome smoker.


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