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Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


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Old 05-20-2018, 06:42 AM   #16
IamMadMan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TedW View Post
Wet brine.

Despite a couple of above posts asserting no flavor penetration, that’s not quite true.
I agree with Ted, the difference in flavor is what you put in the brine that makes the difference and can add flavors. Aromatics, Worcestershire Sauce, and yes even pickle or pepper juice can add great flavors in a brine. http://www.cookshack.com/brining-101

As far as those who say there is more to clean-up with a wet brine, I disagree. Depending on the amount Half Gallon, One Gallon, or Two Gallon ZipLoc bags work fine. Nothing to clean-up, just toss the bag. For those who prefer a container (like myself), Cambro makes inexpensive 2 Qt and 4 Qt containers with a small foot print. They also use the same lid.

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/cambro-2sfsp148-2-qt-white-square-poly-food-storage-container-with-kelly-green-colored-gradations/2142SFSP.html

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/cambro-4sfsp148-4-qt-white-square-poly-food-storage-container-with-kelly-green-colored-gradations/2144SFSP.html

Last edited by IamMadMan; 05-20-2018 at 11:39 AM..
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Old 05-20-2018, 06:52 AM   #17
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Meathead has a nice article about dry brining.
https://amazingribs.com/tested-recip...ul-wet-brining
Assuming you already have a rub you like for chicken, leave out the salt in the rub and apply the rub after brining.
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Old 05-20-2018, 10:01 AM   #18
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This is the best wet brine I have found.
http://ruhlman.com/2010/10/how-to-br...-brine-recipe/
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Old 05-20-2018, 10:08 AM   #19
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Dry brine, no contest. Wet brine water-logs the meat adding to perceived juiciness, but diluted flavor. Plus you're fighting all that extra water when you want crispy skin. I'm a HUGE fan of J. Kenji Lopez-Alt's scientific food research. The guy REALLY knows his chit! Here's his take;

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/11/...nksgiving.html
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Old 05-21-2018, 09:42 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bklmt2000 View Post
Frank, a couple of thoughts:

My preference for chicken is dry-brining; if you're thinking of wet-brining, might as well use a marinade to start, then let the chicken air-dry per the below.

I line a rimmed baking sheet w/ foil, set a stainless cooling rack in it.

I then take whatever chicken I want to dry-brine (in my case, usually wings, legs, or thighs, but BSCB works too), and prep it to go on the cooling rack. This would be breaking down wings into drums, flats, and tips, (discarding the tips, unless saving for stock). Other chicken cuts would get excess fat/skin removed.

Then lay out the chicken on the cooling rack. Pat well with a paper towel to remove excess moisture.


Spray very lightly with cooking spray. Sprinkle to taste with salt, and any other seasonings you like (rubs, etc.). Flip and repeat.

The baking sheet/cooling rack goes into the fridge until time to cook, up to 24 hours in advance. I would suggest at least a few hours minimum, to let the salt do its work.

Getting the chicken up off the baking sheet helps any excess moisture fall away during brining, resulting in crispier skin during cooking.

After that, you're ready to cook!


FYI - if you use some more aromatic seasonings and then stow the chicken in the fridge for a nap, be aware your fridge could end up smelling like whatever seasonings you use. Found this out the hard way, much to my wife's chagrin.
Thanks Brian. I used this process yesterday and my wife said it was the best chicken that I had ever made. 20 hours refrigerated using Killer Hogs AP rub as my brine.
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Old 05-21-2018, 11:28 AM   #21
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For whole chicken, I go wet brine. For small pieces like wings or drumsticks, dry brine is fine.
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Old 05-21-2018, 06:02 PM   #22
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I’ve had good luck with both. I’ve been using oakridge game changer brine lately and really like it. It takes the “mess” out of it for me. Warm on a stove and let cool, pour into a 2 gallon zip loc bag and add chicken.
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Old 05-22-2018, 07:07 AM   #23
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I'm a 'dry-briner'.

I use about 1,5% (of the weight of the bird) of salt.
I then add my rub.
Wrap in plastic foil and leave in the fridge for 48hours.
Remove foil and let it dry uncovered in the fridge for another 24 hours.
Cook at about 325F.

Always comes out moist and delicious.

My chicken/turkey rub:

1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon oregano
1 tablespoon smoked paprika (use hot if you like it more spicy)
1 teaspoon basil
1 teaspoon thyme
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
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Old 05-22-2018, 07:51 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JVM59 View Post
Thanks Brian. I used this process yesterday and my wife said it was the best chicken that I had ever made. 20 hours refrigerated using Killer Hogs AP rub as my brine.
Excellent! I'm glad it worked out for you. It's a method I've used for some time now, and never fails to deliver, whether the chicken I'm making is baked, grilled, etc.


I've used this method for when we have a whole roasted chicken (vs. specific parts like wings, legs, thighs, etc), and that changed the situation from having leftovers for days, to having maybe one night's worth of leftovers. Cool.


When I come across some trick or new approach to making a dish, and my wife says, "Make it like this from now on", I can't help but say: "Yes, dear."


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Old 05-22-2018, 11:58 AM   #25
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The reasons we would brine are to help retain moisture and to infuse flavors into the meat. Dry brining uses the meat's juices to get the brine into solution, whereas they are already dissolved in a wet brine. Once dissolved, the same process is at work to get the brine into the meat. It would seem that the concentrations and amounts of brine ingredients should be able to be adjusted to get exactly the same results whether wet or dry. So other than the obvious differences in how the brine is applied, are there any inherent differences in the final result?
I would think that wet brining would get a more consistent brine over all areas of the meat - though it may be insignificant.
But what about chicken/turkey skin? Does dry brining really result in more crispy skin? Why?
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Old 05-22-2018, 12:12 PM   #26
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Dry brining gives the skin more time to dry out, assuming the bird is uncovered in the fridge at least overnight. I've used both methods - they both work well. Last couple of years I just dry brine for the sake of the skin and because it's less work, and because I'm not trying to imbue the bird with a specific flavor other than bird. ;-)
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Old 05-22-2018, 12:13 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWACKS View Post
But what about chicken/turkey skin? Does dry brining really result in more crispy skin? Why?

Short-answer: Yes.

The more moisture you remove from the skin before cooking, the crispier the skin becomes. Too much moisture will end up steaming the skin, rather than crisping it up.

The best way I've found to accomplish this, is thru dry-brining. After the brine reacts with and infuses into the skin, any remaining moisture on the skin's surface can more easily evaporate than could moisture deeper in the skin itself.

That's why I suggested a rest in the fridge (a few hours to overnight/24 hours if possible) while dry-brining; it gives the salt enough time to infuse into the meat, enhancing the flavor, and moisture evaporation is enhanced by the cold/dry environment of a fridge, since cold air holds far less moisture than warm air.
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Old 05-22-2018, 03:10 PM   #28
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Peking duck air dries for its classic crisp. Could start from a wet or dry brine.


I wet brine, then air dry, and I can get crispy-like-a-chip skin. Wet brining does not mean wet skin
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