MMMM.. BRISKET..
The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS.  



Our Homepage Donation to Forum Overhead Recipes Smoke Signals Magazine Welocme Merchandise Associations Purchase Subscription Amazon Affiliate
Go Back   The BBQ BRETHREN FORUMS. > Discussion Area > Q-talk

Notices

Q-talk *ON TOPIC ONLY* QUALITY ON TOPIC discussion of Backyard BBQ, grilling, equipment and outdoor cookin' . ** Other cooking techniques are welcomed for when your cookin' in the kitchen. Post your hints, tips, tricks & techniques, success, failures, but stay on topic and watch for that hijacking.


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-03-2014, 09:23 PM   #1
dozer996
Is lookin for wood to cook with.
 
Join Date: 10-16-13
Location: Rockford
Default Dry Aged Prime Brisket

Quick Question:

I just picked up a 4lb Dry Aged Prime Brisket from my butcher, he dry ages everything...would you still cook this for 4 hours and wrap in butcher paper or should I temp it and wrap around 160?

Thanks
dozer996 is offline   Reply With Quote




Old 01-03-2014, 11:11 PM   #2
Pyle's BBQ
Babbling Farker
 
Pyle's BBQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: 10-25-06
Location: Madrid, IA
Default

How does dry aging help brisket? I would think you need the moisture in the meat to break down the connective tissue. I have no idea what you would do with this piece of meat. I have heard of wet aging a brisket, but not dry aging.
__________________
Bryan,
Team: Pyle's BBQ

Yoder YS640; Good-One "Trail Boss" 60T; Weber Kettle rotisserie ring; Big A$$ Rotisserie; New Braunfels offset smoker; Weber Smokey Mountain; Backyard Bombers BBQ HJM

Μολν λαβέ
Pyle's BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-03-2014, 11:49 PM   #3
martyleach
Quintessential Chatty Farker

 
Join Date: 12-17-10
Location: Pleasanton, Ca
Default

Dry aging is intended to intensify the beef flavor by dehydrating the meat. You will still need to cook the brisket till the connective tissues break down so I would suggest a different technique. Cook at 275 or so until your rub is set (doesn't push off the meat) and a nice color to the bark then wrap tightly in foil with 1/4 cup beef broth. Cook until probe tender.
Prior to cooking, I would of course cut off all the green and yucky leftovers from dry ageing, if your butcher hasn't done it already.
__________________
XL BGE, Cold smokehouse, Kamado Joe Jr, Santa Maria pit, Backwoods Chubby, 26.75" Weber custom performer, Blackstone 36" griddle, MAK One Star pellet cooker, 22"WSM, Jumbo Joe, WGA, Smokey Joe, UDS, Wood fired pizza oven, UUNI

Custom wooden handles for BBQ's made by Marty Leach (oh, that's me)
[url]http://www.amlwoodart.com[/url]
martyleach is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-03-2014, 11:58 PM   #4
dozer996
Is lookin for wood to cook with.
 
Join Date: 10-16-13
Location: Rockford
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by martyleach View Post
Dry aging is intended to intensify the beef flavor by dehydrating the meat. You will still need to cook the brisket till the connective tissues break down so I would suggest a different technique. Cook at 275 or so until your rub is set (doesn't push off the meat) and a nice color to the bark then wrap tightly in foil with 1/4 cup beef broth. Cook until probe tender.
Prior to cooking, I would of course cut off all the green and yucky leftovers from dry ageing, if your butcher hasn't done it already.
That is what I was looking for, some advice...Thanks Marty.

Can you give me your best results with "Dino Bones", I grabbed a slab of Prime back ribs from him today too. Thanks in advance!
dozer996 is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-04-2014, 12:02 AM   #5
dozer996
Is lookin for wood to cook with.
 
Join Date: 10-16-13
Location: Rockford
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyle's BBQ View Post
How does dry aging help brisket? I would think you need the moisture in the meat to break down the connective tissue. I have no idea what you would do with this piece of meat. I have heard of wet aging a brisket, but not dry aging.
I don't know, I went in and that is all he had...he said Christmas and New Years wiped him out. He dry ages the whole carcass for 3/4 weeks.

Now that you both bring it up, the Dry Aged technique is great for grilling steaks but how will it end up smoking the meat, I don't know but will find out.

I'm going to try Marty's technique tomorrow.
dozer996 is offline   Reply With Quote


Thanks from:--->
Old 01-04-2014, 12:04 AM   #6
martyleach
Quintessential Chatty Farker

 
Join Date: 12-17-10
Location: Pleasanton, Ca
Default

Dozer
I don't know if this was my best but here is one of my dino bones cooks along with a pastrami.
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=166110
__________________
XL BGE, Cold smokehouse, Kamado Joe Jr, Santa Maria pit, Backwoods Chubby, 26.75" Weber custom performer, Blackstone 36" griddle, MAK One Star pellet cooker, 22"WSM, Jumbo Joe, WGA, Smokey Joe, UDS, Wood fired pizza oven, UUNI

Custom wooden handles for BBQ's made by Marty Leach (oh, that's me)
[url]http://www.amlwoodart.com[/url]
martyleach is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-04-2014, 12:27 AM   #7
dozer996
Is lookin for wood to cook with.
 
Join Date: 10-16-13
Location: Rockford
Default

Thanks Marty
dozer996 is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-04-2014, 01:47 AM   #8
plowin-fire
Full Fledged Farker
 
Join Date: 04-26-11
Location: Beresford, SD
Default

Hanging the carcass for 3-4 weeks is normal around here. I would cook as you normally would.
__________________
B & T's BBQ Catering and Vending
plowin-fire is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-04-2014, 03:11 AM   #9
BigBellyBBQ
is One Chatty Farker
 
Join Date: 11-15-08
Location: Lake View, New York
Default

hanging 3 or 4 weeks is not a true dry age. However if it is, be very,very carefull as a 4 pounder is starting very smallllllll...And if it is dry age, a roast that small will crumble on you when slicing if aged..use a wet pan to keep the enviroment moist..
__________________
[I][FONT=Comic Sans MS]TwinTech Pro Double, Backwoods Fat Boy, TwinTech Hawg Kooker, FE 400, SP SPK 700, Empty check book and understanding wife...sometimes..[/FONT][/I]
BigBellyBBQ is offline   Reply With Quote


Old 01-04-2014, 04:57 AM   #10
Partyof5
Knows what a fatty is.
 
Join Date: 07-30-12
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Dry aging is controlling temperature and humidity to create an environment that allows enzymes to break down protein to make meat more tender. Water loss is also happening so beef flavor intensifies. Lastly, some of the by products of the protein breaking down add nutty/cheesy flavors.

Never cooked a dry aged brisket myself, but I would check for doneness at lower temps than what you normally would.
Partyof5 is offline   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


Forum Custom Search: Enter your Search text below. GOOGLE will search ONLY the BBQ Brethren Forum.
Custom search MAY not work(no display box) in some configurations of Internet Explorer. Please use compliant version of Firefox or Chrome.







All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
2003 -2012 © BBQ-Brethren Inc. All rights reserved. All Content and Flaming Pig Logo are registered and protected under U.S and International Copyright and Trademarks. Content Within this Website Is Property of BBQ Brethren Inc. Reproduction or alteration is strictly prohibited.
no new posts