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-   -   Ugly Drum Smoker (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)

Southern Home Boy 01-13-2011 04:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moda253 (Post 1512106)
I am so confused by this UDS. Not ripping it but I live in MN and cook when it's -10* and have never seen a difference. I've cooked in the rain. In high winds and have never shielded or insulated my UDS.

It was an experiment. I met a guy at a comp. that had a double drum like this but had insulated it with rock wool. He said that he used only 4 or 5 lbs of lump for a 12 hour burn and that the insulation really helped to steady temps.

That particular comp we were turning in Brisket with Tornado sirens going off. He took home at least two calls out of that one (and a GC later in the year).

Since I had been fighting to get my ProQ temps up over 200 the entire night, I had pretty much had it with wind and rain temperature loss.

I built my first drum KISS method and it worked great, but I just couldn't shake that "I need one 'dem insulated drum thingies..." feeling. So when I was able to pick up a couple of free drums - one of which was an 85 gal. one - I couldn't resist.

I does hold temps better in inclement weather and I did a few other mods too that makes it my favorite cooker in my stable.

jcinadr 01-14-2011 08:40 AM

I use the barrel lid and not a webber. Last time I smoked I was curing jerky (and actively trying to find how low I could go. I use a BBQ guru to control draft. Lowest I could maintain is 160 - anything lower and the fire was sucking enough through the cracks.

Anyway, it rained during that burn, and I managed to get 1/2" of standing water on the lid - really glad I had not drilled holes in the lid, but simply screwed my smoke stack into the bung hole. fwiw, the UDS functioned flawlessly, even with 1/2" of water on the lid.

moda253 01-14-2011 10:11 AM

I need to comment on this older post.

I don't undertand the infatuation with the statement of having to put your cooking grate at 24" above the coal grate.

First of all it seems that there is some variance between the height of the coal in each persons basket. We dump the hot coals on the top of the charcoal which is completely variable from system to system. The height of each persons charcoal basket and how much charcoal we put in our baskets makes the distance between the hot coals and the cooking grate a variable.

So when I read someone that is concerned about their cooking grate only being 22" above the bottom of their coal basket I have to wonder... does it really matter?

Now sure you don't want the meat right on top of the coals but I highly doubt that it's going to matter one way or the other here.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unfathomable Bastid (Post 1457700)
Hey all,

Another question for you.

The barrel I bought is a bit shorter (34" height) than most. Consequently I don't have as much usable space in the drum. I built my cooking level at 7 inches below the lip, but after I had the fire basket fabricated -- I realized that the difference between the bottom of the fire basket is only 22" from the cooking grate. It seems that the experts maintain I need a minimum of 24" separation. So, I'm two inches short (insert joke here). This is further exacerbated if I'm using 15 lbs of charcoal that are 4-5 inches of height in the basket.

Will the missing two inches cause significant adverse effect? I wouldn't think 22 inches would be so much different than 24.

Thoughts?

-Bastid


smokeyw 01-14-2011 10:52 AM

:confused: I have been looking but am having some trouble locating a 55 gallon, open head, food grade drum. Does anyone know of somewhere in North Carolina that I can pick up a couple?

expatpig 01-14-2011 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moda253 (Post 1512976)
I need to comment on this older post.

I don't undertand the infatuation with the statement of having to put your cooking grate at 24" above the coal grate.

First of all it seems that there is some variance between the height of the coal in each persons basket. We dump the hot coals on the top of the charcoal which is completely variable from system to system. The height of each persons charcoal basket and how much charcoal we put in our baskets makes the distance between the hot coals and the cooking grate a variable.

So when I read someone that is concerned about their cooking grate only being 22" above the bottom of their coal basket I have to wonder... does it really matter?

Now sure you don't want the meat right on top of the coals but I highly doubt that it's going to matter one way or the other here.

Amen, Moda253, It doesn't matter, Many think the dimensions are carved in stone. As for me, I just wanted 7" between my top and bottom grate. My charcoal basket has an adjustable bottom that I raise or lower depending on what I'm cooking. I can actually grill on my bottom grate if I need to.

MeatyOakerSmoker 01-14-2011 01:08 PM

+1 for the who cares about the "golden" 24 inches.

There is no scientific reason behind this from what I can tell. It seemed to work for one person and everyone else took it as gospel. The truth is if you can maintain the right temp at the grate you're good.

blackdog043 01-14-2011 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokeyw (Post 1513026)
:confused: I have been looking but am having some trouble locating a 55 gallon, open head, food grade drum. Does anyone know of somewhere in North Carolina that I can pick up a couple?

They are in Charlotte, but you could always call them. They might know of somone near you, since their in the buisness. They have new and used.
http://www.mcmanusandson.com/?param1...d%20SC%20Drums}

smokeyw 01-14-2011 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blackdog043 (Post 1513207)
They are in Charlotte, but you could always call them. They might know of somone near you, since their in the buisness. They have new and used.
http://www.mcmanusandson.com/?param1...d%20SC%20Drums}

Thanks, I'll give them a call if I can't find something soon. I'm new here and have become intrigued with the UDS. It seems like the best of both worlds.

1FUNVET 01-14-2011 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smokeyw (Post 1513261)
Thanks, I'll give them a call if I can't find something soon. I'm new here and have become intrigued with the UDS. It seems like the best of both worlds.


WARNING !
Do not build a UDS because you will be hooked for the rest of your life :laugh:

deer slayer 01-14-2011 04:01 PM

just bought a new unlined drum for $20 as a second from a drum manufacturer, had a small dent but already hammered it out. i'm on my way... i could only find 1" galvanized washers to use as spacers on the air intakes. these washers will be on the outside of the drum. should this cause me any problems?

1FUNVET 01-14-2011 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deer slayer (Post 1513367)
just bought a new unlined drum for $20 as a second from a drum manufacturer, had a small dent but already hammered it out. i'm on my way... i could only find 1" galvanized washers to use as spacers on the air intakes. these washers will be on the outside of the drum. should this cause me any problems?


What are the spacers for ?

moda253 01-14-2011 04:25 PM

The bolded part is the important part.

[QUOTE=Southern Home Boy;1512245]It was an experiment. I met a guy at a comp. that had a double drum like this but had insulated it with rock wool. He said that he used only 4 or 5 lbs of lump for a 12 hour burn and that the insulation really helped to steady temps.

That particular comp we were turning in Brisket with Tornado sirens going off. He took home at least two calls out of that one (and a GC later in the year).

Since I had been fighting to get my ProQ temps up over 200 the entire night, I had pretty much had it with wind and rain temperature loss.

I built my first drum KISS method and it worked great, but I just couldn't shake that "I need one 'dem insulated drum thingies..." feeling. So when I was able to pick up a couple of free drums - one of which was an 85 gal. one - I couldn't resist.

I does hold temps better in inclement weather and I did a few other mods too that makes it my favorite cooker in my stable.[/QUOTE]

deer slayer 01-14-2011 04:44 PM

i was going to use the flat washer over the outside of a close steel nipple with a conduit nut then screw the cap on

moda253 01-14-2011 04:45 PM

The idea of the conduit nut is the little feet on the nut dig into the barrel and keep it from twisting.

Quote:

Originally Posted by deer slayer (Post 1513412)
i was going to use the flat washer over the outside of a close steel nipple with a conduit nut then screw the cap on


1FUNVET 01-14-2011 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deer slayer (Post 1513412)
i was going to use the flat washer over the outside of a close steel nipple with a conduit nut then screw the cap on


Save the money and buy beer instead of the flat washers.:thumb:
It's not needed.


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