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-   -   Ugly Drum Smoker (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)

kevine 02-07-2012 12:11 AM

Used my UDS (built in early Jan 2012) for the first time on a long cook. Been doing mostly moink balls and ABT's on it, but did a pork butt for Superbowl. Not only did it cook a little faster than my old offset, but it held 235-240 perfectly even for close to 10 hours. I finished an almost 8 lb pork butt in about 9.5 hrs. I opened it a couple times to spray with apple juice, and it dropped to about 215. Within 30 seconds of removing the caps off of the other three intakes, it started going back up quickly. Capped them back off and it just kept on cruising at 240

MAN I LOVE MY UDS!!!

PhilipW 02-12-2012 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevine (Post 1940600)
Used my UDS (built in early Jan 2012) for the first time on a long cook. Been doing mostly moink balls and ABT's on it, but did a pork butt for Superbowl. Not only did it cook a little faster than my old offset, but it held 235-240 perfectly even for close to 10 hours. I finished an almost 8 lb pork butt in about 9.5 hrs. I opened it a couple times to spray with apple juice, and it dropped to about 215. Within 30 seconds of removing the caps off of the other three intakes, it started going back up quickly. Capped them back off and it just kept on cruising at 240

MAN I LOVE MY UDS!!!

You shouldn't really have to give it more air after you take the lid off. In fact the opposite should be true.

If you think about it, before you take that lid off, you only have a very small amount of combustion air coming in through your intakes. When you take that lid off, the fire gets a huge gulp of combustion air (by comparison). It will burn through that air hotter than if you had not taken the lid off.

Your temp gauge drops only because there's some cool air in there at the moment, but the fire isn't running at that new cooler level, it's still hot as it was and even hotter now due to the extra air.

It will easily catch up on its own. In fact, I think most drums will actually run up in temp after taking the lid off. Many turn their intake air off before taking the lid off to prevent too much air from getting in and causing a temp spike.

Rodney 02-12-2012 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevine (Post 1940600)
Used my UDS (built in early Jan 2012) for the first time on a long cook. Been doing mostly moink balls and ABT's on it, but did a pork butt for Superbowl. Not only did it cook a little faster than my old offset, but it held 235-240 perfectly even for close to 10 hours. I finished an almost 8 lb pork butt in about 9.5 hrs. I opened it a couple times to spray with apple juice, and it dropped to about 215. Within 30 seconds of removing the caps off of the other three intakes, it started going back up quickly. Capped them back off and it just kept on cruising at 240

MAN I LOVE MY UDS!!!

Works pretty well, huh? I love mine too.

One thing I've found is that if you cut the pork butt into ~3" slices and cook them like big steaks, the pork still comes out just as tender, but it takes MUCH less time to cook! Gotta go a bit easier on the rub though, because the surface area is so huge.

Good thing to know when you only have ~5 hours to prep and cook some pork, and you'd otherwise decide against it. Possibly less moist pork is better than no pork at all... that's what I say. :thumb:

I'm using Chris Lilly's recipe, by the way. Best I've tried by a long shot, and those who try it enjoy it nearly to the point of what I'd call arousal... :wink:

-Rodney

jgh1204 02-12-2012 05:36 PM

I started another thread but I wanted to memorialize the demise of UDS#1 on the thread where it all started. It finally succumbed to rust and had to be replaced.

bbqwilly 02-12-2012 07:25 PM

I hoping that this week I will have time to start mine. Cant wait to get it built and smoking.

maliclipse 02-13-2012 10:37 PM

mild rust inhibitor??
 
I've been looking at the grainger barrels labeled as "unlined" though coated with a "mild rust inhibitor". I live in an area where I wouldn't be able to burn out the barrel for hours.

Since this is a new barrel do I need to do a big burn out? Can I have the barrel sandblasted or get the coating off with a mild fire like with a 20lb bag of charcoal?

I'm thinking of getting the 96 gallon drum because its 16 gauge (vs 18 on the 85).

Thanks,
M

coewar 02-14-2012 07:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maliclipse (Post 1947423)
I've been looking at the grainger barrels labeled as "unlined" though coated with a "mild rust inhibitor". I live in an area where I wouldn't be able to burn out the barrel for hours.

Since this is a new barrel do I need to do a big burn out? Can I have the barrel sandblasted or get the coating off with a mild fire like with a 20lb bag of charcoal?

I'm thinking of getting the 96 gallon drum because its 16 gauge (vs 18 on the 85).

Thanks,
M

If you can't do a high temp burn out then avoid anything in the barrel. some places maybe have factory burned out used barrels or get a new one. then clean it by scrubbing with a tough scratch pad or sponge perhaps with some alchohol like denatured or rubbing? and clean again with dish soap. Then dry it soon and rub it with an oil like olive oil all over inside plus pipes on the outside. burn that at a high cooking temp (350 at least) for a few hours before any food goes in. This will create a nice protective coating on inside.

micnic 02-14-2012 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rodney (Post 1945818)
Works pretty well, huh? I love mine too.

One thing I've found is that if you cut the pork butt into ~3" slices and cook them like big steaks, the pork still comes out just as tender, but it takes MUCH less time to cook! Gotta go a bit easier on the rub though, because the surface area is so huge.

Good thing to know when you only have ~5 hours to prep and cook some pork, and you'd otherwise decide against it. Possibly less moist pork is better than no pork at all... that's what I say. :thumb:

I'm using Chris Lilly's recipe, by the way. Best I've tried by a long shot, and those who try it enjoy it nearly to the point of what I'd call arousal... :wink:

-Rodney



...so what is so special about Chris Lilly's recipe? Do you mind to share it? :clap2:

RyGuy 02-14-2012 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maliclipse (Post 1947423)
I've been looking at the grainger barrels labeled as "unlined" though coated with a "mild rust inhibitor". I live in an area where I wouldn't be able to burn out the barrel for hours.

Since this is a new barrel do I need to do a big burn out? Can I have the barrel sandblasted or get the coating off with a mild fire like with a 20lb bag of charcoal?

I'm thinking of getting the 96 gallon drum because its 16 gauge (vs 18 on the 85).

Thanks,
M

I would have it sandblasted.

maliclipse 02-14-2012 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coewar (Post 1947577)
If you can't do a high temp burn out then avoid anything in the barrel. some places maybe have factory burned out used barrels or get a new one. then clean it by scrubbing with a tough scratch pad or sponge perhaps with some alchohol like denatured or rubbing? and clean again with dish soap. Then dry it soon and rub it with an oil like olive oil all over inside plus pipes on the outside. burn that at a high cooking temp (350 at least) for a few hours before any food goes in. This will create a nice protective coating on inside.

Thanks for the note back.

The grainger drum is brand spanking new direct from the factory. They have two options, one lined with the redish epoxy stuff and an unlined that has a 'mild rust inhibitor' coating. What I've read is that this mri is a lite oil of sum sort to prevent the inside of the barrel from rusting during shipment.

I'm trying to verify what that oil is and can it be removed safely without doing a 4 hour burn. I'd love to leave the paint on the outside of the barrel intact to save an extra step

The other question I have is can I achieve this hard burn using charcoal instead of wood to keep the smoke down/fire low - I don't want to scare the wife or the neighbors.

Thanks much and best regards,
Michal

coewar 02-15-2012 08:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maliclipse (Post 1948151)
Thanks for the note back.

The other question I have is can I achieve this hard burn using charcoal instead of wood to keep the smoke down/fire low - I don't want to scare the wife or the neighbors.

Thanks much and best regards,
Michal

If it's just an oil, then scrub pad and good grease cutting dish soap should do the trick. And then the rest as I suggested; drying it, rubbing it all down with a thick coat of olive oil and burn it in. That burning is at least 350 which you can easily get with charcoal and your paint will have no issues. I can take mine to 450 without worrying about the outside paint.

maliclipse 02-15-2012 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coewar (Post 1948747)
If it's just an oil, then scrub pad and good grease cutting dish soap should do the trick. And then the rest as I suggested; drying it, rubbing it all down with a thick coat of olive oil and burn it in. That burning is at least 350 which you can easily get with charcoal and your paint will have no issues. I can take mine to 450 without worrying about the outside paint.

I'm going to call the manufacture and find out. From everything I read its definetly not a liner, the barrel is bare metal with an oil on it. I just want to make sure its not toxiic.

I think I'm just going to order the barrel, wash a part of the inside and see if it rusts the next day or two, then I'll do the full wash and as you suggested do an burn with a bag of charcoal and food grade oil to give it a nice protective coating.

I've been going through the pages here one by one and looking at the pictures. A lot of you guys have some stellar ideas that I plan on implementing, mainly:

1) Ball valves
2) Vent piping so you don't have to bend down to adjust intake temps
3) A hook on the lide to be able to hook it on the side while you're moving meat (so you don't have to put it on the ground or a table
4) hooks/shelving for accessories
5) wheels - castors maybe? I've seen a guy attach a dolly to his
6) ash basket with a pan underneath to make cleanup a snap
7) side handles to be able to move the unit around for storage/cleaning
8) a few other things I have in my notes somewhere.

Pappy 02-15-2012 05:45 PM

What about the top? Flat top or weber lid?

maliclipse 02-15-2012 09:12 PM

Gonna go with a flat top...

wmarkw 02-17-2012 11:32 AM

I'm having a difficult time trying to find a drum here in Augusta, GA. There is a guy in SC about 1.5 hours away that has a bunch of food grade drums for sale. There is also a oil company downtown that sell re-conditioned drums, that they say have been commercially cleaned and then this company buys for resale. So there is nothing in them. What should I do? Make the drive or stay local? TIA


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