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-   -   What is the proper temperature for holding food? (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=18031)

JD McGee 01-05-2011 12:05 AM

Cooling
You always take a chance when you have to cool down food. The best way to have safe food is to make it fresh each day, just before you serve it. If you have food that is leftover or made in advance, you must cool it and store it safely. The first rule to remember about cooling: Cool hot food as fast as you can to 41 F or below, past the "Danger Zone."
Food that is not cooled fast enough is one of the leading causes of food borne illness.

http://www.kingcounty.gov/healthserv...foodtemps.aspx

big brother smoke 01-05-2011 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NorthwestBBQ (Post 1502466)
I hate to disagree, but the #1 cause of food borne illness in the food service industry is cross contamination. The washing of hands with warm soapy water, and sanitizing the work area is critical. I got 100% correct on my food handlers card test. :-D

Did you stay in a Holiday Inn Express too? :becky:

Mad About Que 01-23-2011 01:47 PM

prolly the biggest issue with all this is the cooling side of it. Heating up is easy.. If its precooked, take it past 165 for 4 second test, then drop to above 140 to hold.

Cooling is a whole different beast. The thing i miss most about the professionial kitchen is a large walkin cooler.. I know a lot of folks that cook up whole butts, and then toss em into the freezor, whole. Food has 6 hours to get from 140 (or cooking temp) to below 41. 4 hours to get to 70 and the other 2 to drop below 41. outside of that, then you risk it.

That being said... i've never gotten sick, or anyone else sick, off of some table top stored food. Especially if its been cooked or about to be. Food has to be "Out of the danger zone for 4 hours" to be considered PHF (Potential Hazardous Food). Now thats total time, not just at each stage of prep. However, when it doubt, feed it to the pooches.. or is it throw it out..?

18 years of dealing with health inspectors..gotta love em, cause ya can't smoke em.. :-P

Scott_nra 02-10-2011 06:32 PM

ok, so if I have butts whole adn place them in an over at 155* for about 8 hours, then wrap and transport in a cooler 2 hours, then back on heat source...good? If I hold at 160* will it keep cooking or just "hold". THat's doable too.

OL' Timer 02-10-2011 08:38 PM

ServSafe says" 140-70 in 2hrs 70-45 in 2 hrs. It's not 6 hours, its 4 hours total or the bacteria starts to produce toxins into the meat. I pull the bones and pull them in half to cool faster. Briskets I cut the flat away to make it thinner to cool faster. If you use a good cooler and pack with towels to take up any space left in the cooler, you will not have to put back on the heat after only 2 hrs.

RICK Allen 02-10-2011 10:16 PM

Just make sure when cooling and you put it in the fridge or cooler you do so unwrapped as it will sour, once it is cooled down then wrap to prevent drying out

farris 03-23-2011 12:13 PM

great onfo
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by keale (Post 949098)
You don't have to "toss" after 4 hrs, The 4 hr. rule is if its on "display", countertop...etc...no heating...and it should always have a time stamp...

This rule is in Hawaii...

Just went to a sanitation class...
The biggest cause of food born illness is "IMPROPER COOLING"...the recomended time frame is:

140*-70* 2hrs
70*-45* 2 hrs...I believe 40* is the USDA guideline...

this is some great reading. i think I've spent several hours reading and feel a lot more educated now...thanks to all of you g]for the great information!!!1

Trucky1008 03-24-2011 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OL' Timer (Post 1543781)
ServSafe says" 140-70 in 2hrs 70-45 in 2 hrs. It's not 6 hours, its 4 hours total or the bacteria starts to produce toxins into the meat. I pull the bones and pull them in half to cool faster. Briskets I cut the flat away to make it thinner to cool faster. If you use a good cooler and pack with towels to take up any space left in the cooler, you will not have to put back on the heat after only 2 hrs.

Actually what ServSafe says for proper cooling is to first cool from 135 to 70 within two hours, then cool to 41 or lower in the next 4 hours. "Cool TCS food from 135 to 41 or lower within six hours" I just took the course and this information can be found in chapter 8, page 17 (8-17) of the 5th edition.

Matt_A 07-25-2011 09:03 AM

Heating,cooling and holding are some of the most critical areas of food service safety. That's why it's always handy to develop an HACCP checklist and identify all Critical Control Points in your service processes.
http://www.fda.gov/food/foodsafety/h...cp/default.htm

jane nair 02-03-2018 10:21 PM

Bacteria and other harmful organisms need time, food and moisture (or wetness) to grow, but they do not grow well when the temperature of the food is colder than 41 F (7C) or hotter than 135F (60C). The temperatures between 41F and 135F are in the. Keep potentially hazardous foods out of them. For example, when food is left out in the bacteria can grow fast, and make toxins that can make your customers and family very sick.


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