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-   -   Ugly Drum Smoker (https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23436)

Nemo 03-06-2012 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1FUNVET (Post 1970527)
A 2" pipe will work out fine. I used PVC for my pipe and have had no problems with it. When not in use i use the top off a can of spray paint to keep the wasps and bugs out

Sounds like I'm on the right track. Thanks.

Rodney 03-06-2012 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MushCreek (Post 1970615)
I've built a couple of them using 2" pipe (which is actually quite a bit bigger than 2"). They work well, but seem to run a little hot, especially when it's windy. I put a 1/2" wide baffle in mine which seem to get it under control. Charcoal usage is the same as a Weber lid. You want to have a way to cap it off, because if you close the intake and exhaust, your fire will (or should) go out quickly, which will save you some charcoal for the next cook.

Mine has a 2" pipe in the bung hole that came with my lid. It seems to work perfectly for me. Wind causes all kinds of problems with both the intakes and the exhaust... that's a tough one.

Rodney 03-06-2012 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by driftbuster (Post 1969929)
Just starting my first build and I have kingsford grill from gander mountain that will be donating
The lid and racks. My charcoal rack is 14'' and I wraped it with expanded metal, how tall does it
Need to be? Is 8" enough for a long burn, not sure how much charcoal is needed for pork but.
Thanks guys

I've gone 13 hours @ 225 in my 8" tall x 13.5" basket with charcoal to spare. I've heard others say it's good for 17 hours.

-Rodney

BigG_UK 03-07-2012 02:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coewar (Post 1969917)
A 2" hole right in the middle would work, with just a small pipe of length about 2" as well. More is not needed because it'll be 1 pipe right at the top.

However I would opt to not do that as the heat will shoot up and you'll burn a little more fuel.

My friend and I both have built ones where we have 2 holes on the side of the barrel, each of those holes big enough to thread 1.5" iron pipes. Then do an elbow to go up with another short nipple on it so that you can use the cap (instead of the plug) to close it. These holes on the side would be 2-3 inches down from the top, and I'm referring to the top of the hole. So that the smoke has to come out by going down a little before going out.

This has worked great at keeping things moist inside and evening the temp and being fuel efficient. Plus, if you make the holes exactly opposite side of each other, you could remove the elbows and insert a rotisserie rod through it. Don't necessarily need to use the elbows.

If it's outside, you should either spray it with oil or paint it or use galvanized. The temps will not get anywhere close to hot enough there to have health issues with the galvanized. Painting would be for the outside. The point is to prevent the iron from rusting.

Shopping list for the side exhausts:
1.5 inch iron nipples x 4
1.5 inch iron 90 elbow x 2
1.5 inch iron cap x 2

To drill hole to fit just right, you typically need about 1/4" to allow for the iron piping, so you'd have to drill like 1.75" hole.


I'm also about to complete my first UDS, for the top vent in my flat lid I've used the large 2"+ bung hole and fitted a chimney using rolled sheet metal and clamps to form a pipe, I was planning on having this fitted with approx 5" inserted down into the lid to trap smoke/heat in the top section right above the grill, is this advised to maintain a decent temp to prevent it from rising straight out the top ??? It's also easily adjustable so I can change the length below the lid or remove it completely. It extends about 12" above the lid so the wind/breeze shouldn't be a problem. I've made a top hat for it just to have on standby incase of heavy rain/bugs/high winds by using an large upturned metal food can fitted with chicken wire/mesh in it to hold it above the exit of the chimney stack so it allows the smoke to freely escape, I still can't post pictures or I'd show you what I've made so far.

coewar 03-07-2012 09:45 AM

5 Attachment(s)
Here are the pics. It's before I put the elbows on. I actually did a test run just like this without the elbows and it worked fine.

coewar 03-07-2012 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BigG_UK (Post 1971055)
It extends about 12" above the lid so the wind/breeze shouldn't be a problem. I've made a top hat for it just to have on standby incase of heavy rain/bugs/high winds by using an large upturned metal food can fitted with chicken wire/mesh in it to hold it above the exit of the chimney stack so it allows the smoke to freely escape, I still can't post pictures or I'd show you what I've made so far.


The issue with the wind is that a high speed wind will cause more negative pressure which will cause the draft to be much stronger, and the smoker to run hotter. It gets even worse if the wind is blowing into the direction of an open intake vent. The 12" on top you already have there is a huge stack and it will burn a lot of fuel. When it's windy, it'll burn it even faster.

It will still smoke well, but you will burn more fuel. I believe you'll have moisture inside by having it like this. I like it when my food has surrounding water vapor while cooking so I choose not to have such a strong draft.

BigG_UK 03-07-2012 12:17 PM

Thanks for the advice coewar, maybe I should shorten it to just a few inches, maybe 2 or 3 like in Rodneys avatar pic ?? and just have an inch or two below the lid ? To be honest wind won't be a problem very often so of no big concern, will it work better with none at all if I just leave the bung hole open, I can either leave the large 2" or the small 1" or both screw plugs out the lid as required? I'm fitting an adjustable top lid for the shortened stack so I can regulate the exhaust and open and close as I like or position it anywhere between open and closed to slow it down and limit its flow. Maybe I should cut it's length in half or more,
G

Nemo 03-07-2012 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coewar (Post 1971328)
Here are the pics. It's before I put the elbows on. I actually did a test run just like this without the elbows and it worked fine.

It looks like you have a rack above the level of the exhaust? It's a little hard to tell from the pictures.

Ehudbenjamin 03-07-2012 07:43 PM

Who collects their own wood? How long do you season it? Do you cut it into chunks first?

I have access to a few trees...ok a lot if trees of all different flavors. . I figure if I take a branch or two a year I have free wood for life.

driftbuster 03-07-2012 08:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rodney (Post 1970955)
I've gone 13 hours @ 225 in my 8" tall x 13.5" basket with charcoal to spare. I've heard others say it's good for 17 hours.

-Rodney

Thanks Rodney, i was figuring 8 to 10" would be enough.

MushCreek 03-08-2012 05:20 AM

I harvest my own wood, thinning out small trees on our rural SC property. One tall skinny hickory netted about 1,000 chunks! I chop them into 'cookies' on a miter saw, then split in 2/3/4 depending upon the diameter. They dry much faster cut; I start using them in a month. I leave them out in the hot FL sun, which dries them even faster.

Skidder 03-08-2012 05:39 AM

I do notice that when building a UDS and the builder deviates from the tried and true K.I.S.S. method that this is when the trouble starts. I always advise if you possibly can to build a simple K.I.S.S. UDS and then build a second one if you want to experiment. Makes life and cooking so much more fun when your not fighting your cooker. I'm on # 11 and don't have any issues because I follow this.

Pappy 03-08-2012 05:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rodney (Post 1970955)
I've gone 13 hours @ 225 in my 8" tall x 13.5" basket with charcoal to spare. I've heard others say it's good for 17 hours.

My basket is 12" deep. Don't want it that big if you're having a bad back day. Gets kind of heavy. It has gone over 20 hours. I've only filled it 1 or 2 times.

Paul Worth 03-08-2012 07:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ehudbenjamin (Post 1972088)
Who collects their own wood? How long do you season it? Do you cut it into chunks first?

I have access to a few trees...ok a lot if trees of all different flavors. . I figure if I take a branch or two a year I have free wood for life.


I harvest my own oak, hickory, pecan, cherry, peach, and pear. I typically cut it into 6" long pieces, let those sit for a year, then split them into fist-sized chunks.

coewar 03-08-2012 08:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nemo (Post 1971856)
It looks like you have a rack above the level of the exhaust? It's a little hard to tell from the pictures.

That is correct. My racks actually just have feet for the height. So I only have 1 set of bolts down low for my base rack (where I can put something to diffuse heat) and then essentially "rack tables" on top. Makes it very quick to take things out and replace and let's me be flexible for whatever size of things I might be smoking. Each set of "feet" is held with a butterfly nut on one side so I can adjust it too.


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