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jeffsasmokin
11-27-2004, 05:35 AM
At my Holiday Barbeque I'm going to try having "Pulled Pork" for some of my guests, on top of the usual fare. Are there any tips or tricks anyone can impart - as I have not tried this yet. Do you pull by hand, or with a fork? It seems pretty simple and self explanatory, but I know someone out there has a special way of doing it.

All ideas appreciated!

Merry Christmas!!!

Jeff in Florida

Neil
11-27-2004, 05:53 AM
Pull which ever way you prefer. I pull with my hands. As far as tips go, there are plenty of threads on this subject in Q-talk. Just use the roadmap. Go to Cattle Call, introduce yourself, and join the party.

Bigmista
11-27-2004, 06:01 AM
Personally I pull with 2 forks. Doesn't really matter though. It's just a preference. The real trick is getting the pork tender and juicy enough to pull.

Saiko
11-27-2004, 07:53 AM
I wear a pair of heavy duty dishwashing gloves and pull by hand. I prefer using the hands over a fork cause it's easier to "feel" the fat, grab it and chuck it in the trash can.
I'm still kicking myself for not buying a full set of silicon gloves that costco had on sale. Even with the dishwashing gloves I have to run my hands under cold water now and then to cool them off.

kcquer
11-27-2004, 09:59 AM
Jeff, I agree with the manual method. Does make sorting easier. If the butts have cooled back to 160 before you pull them, gloves are even optional. The stuff pulls really easy. I just pick out the bad stuff, squish the individual lobes into strands and before pulling them apart I cut the long strands in half with scissors to make it a bit more manageable on buns.
I highly recommend a vinegar based finishing sauce, (recipies and files sections) a few squirts over the pork makes a world of difference. Unless you use a bunch of it you won't notice the vinegar flavor at all, it does cut some of the fattiness of the pork and mellow some of the stonger flavors. Still perfect for adding a red Q sauce after.

brdbbq
11-27-2004, 10:15 AM
Bear Claws

jminion
11-27-2004, 11:58 AM
I use a cheap pair of those white cotton gloves ($1 a pair) and put regular foodhandlers gloves over them. You can pull a whole hog comfortably this way, a butt is no problem.
Jeff
Cook the butt at 225 to 250 pit temp, you want the internal to be 195 internal ( I look for this temp becuase I find the product to have better moisture content but well rendered). What I will do is foil and pull off the cooker at 185 internal, there is enough of a heat load in the butt to get to 195 while resting in a dry cooler. When I pull it I pullin chunks about the size of your thumb.

A good injection is
1 1 /2cups of apple juice
1 cup water
1 cup sugar
1/2cup salt ( you can add some rub to this so you have a total of 1/2cupof salt and rub combined)
4 Tbsp worcestshirer sauce
inject the night before the cook.
Good luck

BBQchef33
11-27-2004, 12:10 PM
i use hands also..

i have the bear claws and start with them to shread it into large chunks, then finsh with my hands cause its easier to take the nasty stuff out. And like Jim said, a dash of vinegar to get thigs started. Nothing brings the sweetness in the pork out like some salted vinegar. Then a little BBQ sauce..

oh great, now im hungry.

tommykendall
11-27-2004, 12:53 PM
Nothing brings the sweetness in the pork out like some salted vinegar


That's true but don't use too much of it otherwise you'll have mush pork.

Wayne
11-27-2004, 01:39 PM
I use cheap hardware store heavy green rubber chemical gloves. They keep your hands clean and protect from the heat of the hot pork. I also use two forks, and bear claws if they are handy. I like the bear claws the best and if you buy them for nothing else but this they are more than worth it. I got mine from a brother on the Trading Post. Some people also fixe chopped port and call it pulled pork. This is mostly in resturants that have the need for speed. Happy pulling with what ever method you choose.

brdbbq
11-27-2004, 08:12 PM
I like the bear claws


Oh gawd we agree n somehing, mark the calendar.....

Wayne
11-27-2004, 08:31 PM
Ummmmmmmmm........pullllllled porrrrrrrk. Ahhhhh(burp)hhhhhh.......

jeffsasmokin
11-28-2004, 05:04 AM
Wow! Thanks for all the help!!! This site has turned out to be quite the God-Send. I wish I had known about it back when I first got my 'dera.

Several of you have mentioned the vinegar based finishing sauce. What exactly does that do to the pork? Is it added "before or during" the pull, or "after"? I am assuming your Q sauce goes on, on top of that?

Jeff in Florida

Neil
11-28-2004, 06:55 AM
Add it after you pull the pork and your assumption is correct but it is also very tastey by itself w/o the Q sauce.

BBQchef33
11-28-2004, 10:58 AM
I use vinegar 2 ways depending on what I'm doing. In a vinegar based sauce I add it aftger its pulled and on a 7lb butt i may use upwards of 1-2 cups of vinegar(with spices added). Watch out, to much vinegar makes it turn to mush...

But if i'm going with a tomato based or BBQ sauce I will always add a little cider vinegar to the pork first to pull out the sweetness. A tablespoon or 2 at a time(and a little cayenne.) Not enough to taste the vinegar, but just some to balance the pork. then I hadd the BBQ sauce.


Theres is a great sauce in our recipes section under down home pulled port sandwichs. Give it a try.

parrothead
11-28-2004, 11:03 AM
pulled port sandwichs. Give it a try.

You use wine on your sandwich?

racer_81
11-28-2004, 12:16 PM
pulled port sandwichs. Give it a try.

You use wine on your sandwich?

Maybe he "leans to the left", if you know what I mean..... 8)

cayenne
12-02-2004, 04:57 PM
I've a question....
Do ya'll cook the butts whole or do you cut them in half? I've noticed on mine...that I get them pretty much tender enough...but, I'm just not happy with the smoke penetration. The outside has good smokey flavor, but, that part deep inside, near the bone...just bland tasting grey meat. The smoke ring on my butts never looks as well demarked at my briskets...

So, was thinking, maybe I need to cut them in half?

Any ideas or suggestions? I like a VERY smokey BBQ taste all through the meat...

cayenne

BBQchef33
12-02-2004, 08:16 PM
i leave them whole.

Increase your smoke and lower your temps to leave them in the smoke a little longer. Be careful, there will be a fine line between heavier smoke flavor crossing over into bitterness. Are you using all wood or charcoal/lump? Maybe consider a stronger wood if your using mild stuff like maple or fruit, switch to mesquite or hickory and oak. You may even want to try to go away frome sweet blue and get the smoke a little heavier(white). Personally, i always go for invisable smoke, but at all the competitions i see some heavy white coming out of the pits. I asked a few of the cooks and say they let it smoke heavy early on when the meat is cool to let the smoke penetrate deeper and then clear it up later on in the cook. Jim and I were wandering around commenting on all the heavy white coming out of the cookers. Maybe give it a try. Personally, i'll stick with sweeet blue. :)

jminion
12-02-2004, 08:49 PM
Phil's advice is first rate, transparent smoke is the aim, white smoke means that you have a large amount of inpurities in it.

There is a misconception that smoke penetrates meat, it just doesn't happen. I have had the pleasure of cooking with maybe the best pork cook in the country (has won pork shoulder at MIM 6 years in a row), he limits the smoke to shoulder and butts.

You can get the desired effect by using a stronger wood but you to balance that with putting on too much and ending up with bitter product. Think about using an injection and a long slow cook. When you pull it, make it long pieces with bark on almost every chunk. To get that done you won't want to take it past 195 internal.

Cooking one piece is best because there are 7 different mucles in a butt and they don't all have the same kind of fat content, those that do help keep the others from drying out.

cayenne
12-03-2004, 11:41 AM
i leave them whole.

Increase your smoke and lower your temps to leave them in the smoke a little longer. Be careful, there will be a fine line between heavier smoke flavor crossing over into bitterness. Are you using all wood or charcoal/lump? Maybe consider a stronger wood if your using mild stuff like maple or fruit, switch to mesquite or hickory and oak. You may even want to try to go away frome sweet blue and get the smoke a little heavier(white). Personally, i always go for invisable smoke, but at all the competitions i see some heavy white coming out of the pits. I asked a few of the cooks and say they let it smoke heavy early on when the meat is cool to let the smoke penetrate deeper and then clear it up later on in the cook. Jim and I were wandering around commenting on all the heavy white coming out of the cookers. Maybe give it a try. Personally, i'll stick with sweeet blue. :)

Thanks for the replies. I only use charcoal to start the fire...I go all wood after that. I usually mix mesquite and hickory...I generally do all mesquite for brisket.

I've found my smoke is usually white all the time...with no smoke...the temps aren't very high...and at that point the fire is almost out....not sure how to get the 'thin blue' that I've read about here on the forum.

I'll try to keep it low, but, most time my temps usually do not get into the 200 range....so, I'm thinking maybe that isn't a factor...but, I'll keep playing with it to see how it goes....

The way I've done in the past, from reading here...is smoke butt to internal temp of 160, put in foil with mop, cook till internal of 190...take it off and let it set. I had one that come out almost fall apart...the other was still pretty tough. I think I found an old cooler out back, I'll try to cooler it next time...

But, either way...the internal meat was not very smoky flavored...and not a really noticible smoke ring on the outside like I see with brisket or other beef cuts I've done...

:-(

C

jminion
12-03-2004, 12:17 PM
Cayenne What are cooking on? Cooking with all wood on the wrong style or size cooker is real over rated.

cayenne
12-03-2004, 03:41 PM
Cayenne What are cooking on? Cooking with all wood on the wrong style or size cooker is real over rated.

Bandera....

jminion
12-03-2004, 04:18 PM
I'm sure there are cooks cooking with all would on a Bandera but the pit doesn't have the size to need to cook with all wood, it is more expensive and takes much more fire control. Charcoal with wood for flavor is what the pit was designed for.

Saiko
12-03-2004, 10:04 PM
I'm sure there are cooks cooking with all would on a Bandera but the pit doesn't have the size to need to cook with all wood, it is more expensive and takes much more fire control. Charcoal with wood for flavor is what the pit was designed for.

?????

This really depends on where you live. In Georgia, it's a LOT cheaper to smoke with all wood and no charcoal. I can get all the hickory, cherry and red oak I want for practically nothing.
Also, the Bandera firebox size IS small, but can easily manage an "all wood" fire. You can't use normal "fireplace" sized split wood, but if you use chunks that are about half that size it works fine. I simply take a chainsaw to a log and cut "wheels" that are about 6" to 8" inches in diameter, then split these into four chunks. This size works perfect in the bandera firebox.

http://www.markredman.net/bandera/chunk.jpg

kcquer
12-03-2004, 11:16 PM
[quote=jminion]I'm sure there are cooks cooking with all would on a Bandera but the pit doesn't have the size to need to cook with all wood, it is more expensive and takes much more fire control. Charcoal with wood for flavor is what the pit was designed for.

?????

This really depends on where you live. In Georgia, it's a LOT cheaper to smoke with all wood and no charcoal. I can get all the hickory, cherry and red oak I want for practically nothing.
Also, the Bandera firebox size IS small, but can easily manage an "all wood" fire. You can't use normal "fireplace" sized split wood, but if you use chunks that are about half that size it works fine. I simply take a chainsaw to a log and cut "wheels" that are about 6" to 8" inches in diameter, then split these into four chunks. This size works perfect in the bandera firebox.

quote]

I think what Jim means by size is the volume of the smoke box. The problem I've had when trying to burn all wood is when I get a large enough coal bed to produce clean ignition for an all wood fire, pit temp is 250 or more, get the temps down to 200-215 for briskets and I get bad smoke. If the smoke chamber were larger you could burn a big enough fire to get clean smoke and the desired pit temp.

Not saying that you're not doing it and making it work for you, just saying that given the small size of the Bandera's smokebox it's difficult, especially for a beginner.

Neil
12-03-2004, 11:20 PM
I'm with you Saiko. In the morning I'll be going out to cut up a bunch of bull dozed over apple trees to feed the 'dera. Plan on cutting them just that size.

BBQchef33
12-04-2004, 01:23 AM
i agree with neil and seiko. I cooked on the bandera for a couple years using all wood. Logs were beer can size andesometimes I would even split them to have them light faster. Occasionally I may add som elump to maintain a coal bed, but was mostly all wood.

tommykendall
12-04-2004, 01:29 AM
In Georgia, it's a LOT cheaper to smoke with all wood and no charcoal. I can get all the hickory, cherry and red oak I want for practically nothing.


Amen brother - that was my endless wood pile (along with a shot a applle) in MD. If I meiss anything in MD besides my buds Mike, Hans, and Sparky, it's my wood.

parrothead
12-04-2004, 07:55 AM
tk misses his wood. Pass it on.

tommykendall
12-04-2004, 10:34 AM
tk misses his wood. Pass it on.


cialis mod

jeffsasmokin
12-04-2004, 11:32 AM
I'm sure there are cooks cooking with all would on a Bandera but the pit doesn't have the size to need to cook with all wood, it is more expensive and takes much more fire control. Charcoal with wood for flavor is what the pit was designed for.I have had great success using all real wood. The key is to burn all the phenols and creosote from the wood prior to it entering your fire box. I have designed and fabricated a burn barrel that works wonders and makes the job alot easier. Happy to share photos with anyone interested in it. Using real wood is time and labor extensive - but hey, that's part of the fun of Q'ing. It also helps to upgrade your fire grate - the factory grate on the "dera is farking ridiculous. It also helps if you have seasoned wood readily available - since being smacked by 2 back-to-back Hurricanes, that hasn't been a problem! LOL!

If Spice gets those charcaol baskets going - I'm sure I would use my 'Dera a heck of alot more than I do now.

jminion
12-04-2004, 12:35 PM
Saiko
The tradition in your part of the country is to burn wood down to coals then adding those coals to the cooker at that point as Jeff points out. How often do you have tend the fire, every 45 mins to each hour?

When I cook on offsets they are much larger than a Bandera, I have a large coal base and will use logs of different sizes to get 4 to 5 hour burns but will do something to protect the meat from all that smoke.
After spending years of cooking along side or with some of the top cooks on the KCBS and MIM circut I see one common factor, they are not using as much raw wood as you are in cookers of much large size.

tommykendall
12-04-2004, 01:02 PM
Happy to share photos with anyone interested in it


By all means - post the photos as a separate topic.

Saiko
12-04-2004, 01:53 PM
Saiko
The tradition in your part of the country is to burn wood down to coals then adding those coals to the cooker at that point as Jeff points out. How often do you have tend the fire, every 45 mins to each hour?

When I cook on offsets they are much larger than a Bandera, I have a large coal base and will use logs of different sizes to get 4 to 5 hour burns but will do something to protect the meat from all that smoke.
After spending years of cooking along side or with some of the top cooks on the KCBS and MIM circut I see one common factor, they are not using as much raw wood as you are in cookers of much large size.

I have to tend the fire about every 15 to 20 minutes, but that's part of the fun for me. I get bored with the WSM, plus it keeps me out of doing errands for the wifey.

The only thing I do with my wood is heat it on top of the firebox before throwing it in. Maybe it's because I use mainly cherry wood, or maybe it's due to the small size of the logs, but I never get any bitter creosote taste in my meat. Of course, I'm not competing, I'm just making que for me and my friends but I get no complaints. Heck, I don't even take the bark off.

If we ever decide to build the outdoor kitchen we have been talking about for years, I'm gonna break down and buy a Klose. Then I can compare the dera to a full size firebox, but the dera is the only smoker I have used for all wood fires.

jminion
12-04-2004, 02:04 PM
Saiko
I'm too old be able to spend that kind of time tending fires! :wink:
Jim

Neil
12-05-2004, 07:46 AM
I tried Jim's injection recipe for the 7# butt I smoked yesterday. Filled up the injector stuck it into the pork butt, hit the bone and the farking needle breaks. So much for injecting this time around.

sirthames
12-05-2004, 08:14 AM
I prefer to cook with wood coals myself. With all the red oak, white oak and hickory i have around my house, it is there for the taking. I think it only gets expensive when you have to buy the wood too. I ave found places where they are clearing land and they will let you go in after they are done and basically get what you want. Now you just need a chain saw.