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kcquer
11-22-2004, 01:25 PM
Never mind the injections and what not, at what pit temp do you cook your boob?

Do you wrap and return to cook, or wrap after cooking?

What temp do you remove from heat?

Will the bird breast benefit from cooler time or is this something best served straight away?

chad
11-22-2004, 01:45 PM
Never mind the injections and what not, at what pit temp do you cook your boob?

Do you wrap and return to cook, or wrap after cooking?

What temp do you remove from heat?

Will the bird breast benefit from cooler time or is this something best served straight away?

1. 275 - hey, it's poultry not brisket! "Gitter done!"
2. nope
3. 180 internal
4. Not really. You can hold it if needed but you won't get much improvement and the skin (which isn't going to be great anyway - if it was so good why doesn't Louis Rich leave it on?) will get soggy and nasty instead of crisp and nasty! :D

roknrandy
11-22-2004, 01:46 PM
Here's what I did

http://www.bandera-brethren.com/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=viewtopic&t=4080&highlight=

Bill-Chicago
11-22-2004, 02:06 PM
Same as DF, but at 220-230.

Boobs are in there with ribs and everything elso I serve, so they go low and slow like the rest.

jminion
11-22-2004, 02:08 PM
I do turkey breasts (chicken also) at 275 to 325 pit temp, I pull the then off the cooker once they reach 157 to 160 internal.
I don't believe foiling or cooler time will increase quality.

chad
11-22-2004, 02:17 PM
If you can't take the poultry from 40 thru 140 in two hours or less you are risking potential food poisoning - that's the primary reason I cook poultry a bit hotter. Salmonella is not an issue with ribs, brisket, etc. and hence you can safely cook slower.

But hey, if commode hugging on the Friday after Thanksgiving is your thing?? Go for it! :twisted:

Bill-Chicago
11-22-2004, 02:21 PM
If you can't take the poultry from 40 thru 140 in two hours or less you are risking potential food poisoning - that's the primary reason I cook poultry a bit hotter. Salmonella is not an issue with ribs, brisket, etc. and hence you can safely cook slower.

:

Good info DF. Looks like I'll set the boobs on there own in the WSM and run hotter.

Leave more room for the brisket and chili in the vertical.

I have 2 boobs and a whole one for the fryer. 11 people. Hope we'll have enough

jminion
11-22-2004, 02:49 PM
With poultry you don't have the connective tissue or the fat of most meats we cook, so low and slow is not the ideal condition. If your are going to low and slow then brine and use a little Tender Quick in the recipe, that will keep you safe during the long cook.

Bill-Chicago
11-22-2004, 02:53 PM
so at 250 to 275, how long you leaving it on the pit approx. Are we ballparking 3 hours?

kcquer
11-22-2004, 03:23 PM
3. 180 internal

I always err to the side of caution when it comes to food safety, but isn't 170 good to go for turkey breast?

chad
11-22-2004, 03:31 PM
If you want! Go for it! USDA recommended is 180 - I'm food safe certified (and in other ways certifiable!) and so "always" recommend what the big guys say! :D Keeps me from getting sued. Breast or dark meat poison you the same! :twisted:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/FAQ/hotlinefaq.htm#4

chad
11-22-2004, 03:32 PM
Here's some USDA food safety FAQs:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Frame/FrameRedirect.asp?main=http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/FAQ/hotlinefaq.htm#4

chad
11-22-2004, 03:35 PM
And, if the previous links aren't enough to keep you up at night:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/index.asp

A few more fact sheets.

And you thought serving food was easy!! :D

kcquer
11-22-2004, 03:48 PM
If you want! Go for it! USDA recommended is 180 - I'm food safe certified (and in other ways certifiable!) and so "always" recommend what the big guys say! Keeps me from getting sued. Breast or dark meat poison you the same!


DF, the link in the above post says "whole poultry-180, poultry breast-170"

chad
11-22-2004, 03:53 PM
That's boneless chicken breasts - but, hey, do what you want! :D

I'm not trying to start a "discussion" the USDA has a standard and as a food professional I dismiss their recommendations at my risk.

You will probably be ok to go to "only" 170 with a turkey breast but I can't tell you that that is a safe practice.

Boneless chicken - yeah, whole turkey breast - nope, not in good conscience.

Now, that's the last I'm posting about food safety for this holiday season.

Be safe and enjoy.

kcquer
11-22-2004, 03:59 PM
From the USDA

When cooking only a turkey breast, the internal temperature should reach 170 F.

From this page- http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/tbcook.htm

Bill-Chicago
11-22-2004, 04:01 PM
From the USDA

When cooking only a turkey breast, the internal temperature should reach 170 F.

From this page- http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OA/pubs/tbcook.htm

You two should get a room.

All these years I thought I was ****ting out my insides was from the gravy

jminion
11-22-2004, 04:03 PM
If your going to take turkey breast to 180, you best brine cause that will be some of the dryest turkey you will have eaten.
When doing whole turkeys I always do the temping in the thighs and 180 is the number.
Also if you read some of the articles at the site David posted it talks about pink meat, this article does not take into consideration smoking turkey and we all know about the pink at the bone, you can not get away from the color.

chad
11-22-2004, 04:05 PM
KC, et al:

Do as you please! I don't care if you cook to 170 - but I've been food poisoned and slow cooking any poultry to 170 may make me sick again- it's no fun, at all.

So, if you feel confident about that poultry - cook and serve away! Also, what's the copyright on your source? Recommendations change - a good example is pork - it can now be served at 160.

Have fun, be safe.

kcquer
11-22-2004, 04:05 PM
David, not trying to turn this thread into a debate over 10 degrees, but no one wants to make their family sick, neither do any of us want to serve dry bird. 10 extra degrees will make for a lot drier bird, and if its not necessary to take it to 180 I wouldn't want anyone to think it is. I've been under the impression that 170 was safe for boobs for a quite a while and have no idea where that number came from (one of my therms I think). Just wanted to make sure info is accurate as there are a lot of not so frequent visitors on the site today and no doubt its for turkey info.

chad
11-22-2004, 04:10 PM
And as I said, do as you please! :D

I cook to 180 - I usually inject the bird, too, and dryness is not an issue. I also almost always cook whole birds and so use the 180 dark meat/juices run clear test.

I'm not trying to perpetuate a pissing contest either. Really, do what you think is best. Ten degrees shouldn't matter - and odds are if you pull the breast at 170 it's going to continue to rise to 180 well before you start to serve it anyway. :mrgreen:

racer_81
11-22-2004, 04:11 PM
You brethren, separated by a mere 10 degrees.....if you get it
down to 6 degrees of separation....you can go to this website:

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/oracle/

Bill-Chicago
11-23-2004, 08:48 AM
Just checked

My whole bird is in a 8% solution, and the breast are in a "up to 15%" solution, so they are well brined.

Thanks for the great info