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View Full Version : Secret to a great Porkchop (Request)


bggarric
12-10-2010, 07:17 PM
I think that the porkchop may be one of the most under appreciated cuts of meat. I really love them especially when they are cooked well. However, having said that it is really easy to mess them up, too!

I grew up eating pork chop, and my dad's were always really good, but I think it's time I step up and beat him at his own game!:boxing: We both bought Primo Kamado's and he's tried porkchops on it and said they're the best he's had/made.

Anyway, I'd like to learn how to make a really epic porkchop. I'm open to any suggestions/ideas. What's best? Bone-in? Center cut?

I'd like to stay fairly simple with my recipe. I just want something I can pull out and make really well without a ton of bells and whistles. Maybe a simple marinade and a rub? I dunno.... y'all are the experts.

Thanks so much for your help!!

landarc
12-10-2010, 07:21 PM
I make great pork chops in many ways. First, get a quality pork chop, I mean thick and with a good white fat edge, marbeled is probably to much to ask. Still, then I rub it heavily with Simply Marvelous Cherry or Apple rub, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and let it sit for 12 hours. Then put on a really hot grill, cook until gorgeous on both sides. I cook to an internal of 140F or so.
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080002.jpg?t=1263002818

These needed a second rub application, but, look at the finished product...
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080005.jpg?t=1263002805

Chef Jim
12-10-2010, 07:26 PM
I love pork, and chops are always good. I like them extra thick and then slow cook with indirect heat. Kind of like doing ribs. They always come out delish.

Jiga
12-10-2010, 07:32 PM
I make great pork chops in many ways. First, get a quality pork chop, I mean thick and with a good white fat edge, marbeled is probably to much to ask. Still, then I rub it heavily with Simply Marvelous Cherry or Apple rub, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and let it sit for 12 hours. Then put on a really hot grill, cook until gorgeous on both sides. I cook to an internal of 140F or so.
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080002.jpg?t=1263002818

These needed a second rub application, but, look at the finished product...
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080005.jpg?t=1263002805
MY GOD!!!!!
Due to lack of time I am about to eat chicken out of a toaster oven!!!!!
I am drooling over ^^ that picture^^

Johnny_Crunch
12-10-2010, 07:43 PM
The biggest key is to not over cook them. Be ready to pull them when they reach 140 -150 internal temp.

Rookie'48
12-10-2010, 07:48 PM
Being in Iowa does have it's advantages sometimes :-D. We are blessed with something called the "Iowa Chop" that is a pork chop cut 1 1/4 inches thick! The perfect looking ones that landarc posted above look to be about 1 inch thick for comparision.

bggarric
12-10-2010, 07:55 PM
I make great pork chops in many ways. First, get a quality pork chop, I mean thick and with a good white fat edge, marbeled is probably to much to ask. Still, then I rub it heavily with Simply Marvelous Cherry or Apple rub, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and let it sit for 12 hours. Then put on a really hot grill, cook until gorgeous on both sides. I cook to an internal of 140F or so.
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080002.jpg?t=1263002818

These needed a second rub application, but, look at the finished product...
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P1080005.jpg?t=1263002805



Those look awesome!! So what temperature are you cooking these at? I know you said it's a "really hot grill", but I'm still a bit of a rookie so I'm not positive where that is... is that 300? 400? 600?.

Also, does anyone have a preference as far as bone in or boneless?

I've made a few really good chops before, but many times they end up being a bit tough or dry (or both). Is this due to over cooking the chops or perhaps buying pork chops that are too thin?

Grillman
12-10-2010, 08:38 PM
Also, does anyone have a preference as far as bone in or boneless?

I've made a few really good chops before, but many times they end up being a bit tough or dry (or both). Is this due to over cooking the chops or perhaps buying pork chops that are too thin?

Bone-in is great.....Food with a handle is hard to beat.

As others have said...most peoples problem is they overcook their food,
especially Pork.

landarc
12-10-2010, 09:09 PM
I run the kettle up to 400F, direct fire temperature, offset thermo shows the kettle at 300F, I hit it over direct fire to get color, then over 300F area until medium rare. Let rest, and it will climb to a soft medium. Oh, look, more pictures!
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P4280043.jpg?t=1272512251
http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u105/landarc/P4280055.jpg?t=1272512268

(pork chops are not under appreciated here)

leanza
12-10-2010, 09:41 PM
that chop made me cry. Its so beautiful.

BBQ Bandit
12-10-2010, 09:48 PM
My preference starts with an uncut porkloin... (4-6 lb.) bone in or boneless (your choice).
(That way... you can determine your own thickness at dinnertime)

Rubbed, marinaded, at 250* for about 2 hours until internal temp 145-150.
Pull off and rest at least 15 minutes... and watch how tender it cuts... my family prefers it this way

Black Dog BBQ
12-10-2010, 10:04 PM
Those look awesome! It is time for me to revisit the pork chop. I have done them in the past but I think I have always overcooked.

Ron_L
12-10-2010, 10:37 PM
I prefer a center cut, bone-in chop that is 1 1/2 inch thick. I brine them for a couple of hours and then grill them until 145 - 150 internal, and then rest and eat! Most times I sear each side over direct heat and then finish indirect, but sometime I start indirect and then finish with a reverse sear.

big brother smoke
12-10-2010, 10:43 PM
My chops, I brine for an hour in one of our flavored rubs, water, white sugar and kosher salt.

T-Man
12-10-2010, 11:00 PM
Brining them helps and dont over cook...

swibirun
12-11-2010, 06:58 AM
My steps for a great pork chop are

Use a "two bone" pork chop (1 1/2 to 2" thick, not really two bones thick)

Brine:
4 hours
2 cups apple juice
2 cups water
3/4 cup turbinado sugar
1/4 cup coarse kosher salt
1 tsp red pepper flakes
Rinse after brine and dry very well. Might even air dry them in the fridge for a few more hours. Wet tissue won't brown as well.

Rub:
1/4 c white sugar
1/4 c turninado sugar
1/4 c smoked paprika
2 T garlic salt
2 T kosher salt
1 t black pepper, smoked
1 t cayenne pepper
1 t cumin
1/4 t allspice
1/2 t dried thyme

Sear:
600f direct heat for 4-6 minutes total.

Roast:
Cut heat to 400f and switch to indirect heat. Cook until an internal temp of 140-145f. Remove and let rest on a raised rack, loosely tented with foil, for 10 minutes

Hub
12-11-2010, 07:10 AM
There's some great input here! I second the motion on bone-in chops about 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 inches thick. Good spicy rub. Sear and get to about 140 or 150 internal. Fantastic eats and some of the best grilled food ever.

Loin slices can be done the same way but don't typically have enough fat to help max out the flavor. A friend of mine brines them for 4-6 hours and this really helps on the flavor end.

Viva pork fat!!!!

High Q
12-11-2010, 07:19 AM
My son and I recently had good luck cooking indirect at 400 or so for about 40 minutes until the interior reached 130 ish. We then put them right over the hot side of the grill to get a sear and grill makrs. WE let rest for 10 minutes under foil and they were great. We used EVOO and real basic salt and pepper rub. He squirted them with apple juice from time to time because he likes to play with the grill. We didn't have time for a brine but that does help if you have time.

jtphillips
12-11-2010, 12:16 PM
I think brining your pork chops will produce the results you are looking for. I cut my chops to roughly 1-1/2 inches thick and soak them in a brine:1 quart cool water
1/2 cup Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt
1/2 cup sugarMix in a non-reactive container until dissolved. Substitute 1/4 cup + 2 Tablespoons Morton Kosher Salt or 1/4 cup table salt for Diamond Crystal.


I put all of the ingredients in a gallon Ziploc bag and shake it vigirously until all the solids have dissolved. Typically, I will soak the chops for around two hours; however, the time really depends on how thick your chops are. Remember that your brined chops will cook a little faster than a "green" piece of meat. I always sear on direct medium-high heat and transfer to inderect to finish cooking.

dadsr4
12-11-2010, 12:35 PM
I cook direct on a Weber grill 5 min per side, then check temp to see if done. I like a 1" thick chop, rubbed with adobo seasoning, then olive oil. Did this on Thurs, Wife approved.