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JD08
11-16-2010, 09:21 PM
I'm trying to find a couple of cookbooks for Louisiana cuisine. I know there's a difference between New Orleans and Cajun, but I'm just looking for some basics like gumbo, jambalaya, and etouffee. I'd prefer to stick with more homestyle than gourmet recipes.

If there's any group of people that can answer any cooking question, it's the people here, so any and all suggestions are appreciated.

yelonutz
11-16-2010, 09:33 PM
I have a few bookmarked or are you looking for hard copy for a gift?

NUTZ

NeoTrout
11-16-2010, 09:43 PM
I have enjoyed the recipes from "Justin Wilson's Homegrown Louisiana Cookin'". Nothing fancy. Just good stuff. :cool:

Johnny_Crunch
11-16-2010, 09:45 PM
Emeril has a few good cookbooks.

NeoTrout
11-16-2010, 09:51 PM
Emeril has a few good cookbooks.

I agree. I would go with Emeril's "Louisiana Real & Rustic". His other ones may get a bit too fancy for what JD08 wanted. :cool:

Louisiana Smoker
11-16-2010, 10:13 PM
John Folce is a well known Cajun chef and his recipes are awesome. The lastest one out is "After the Hunt". The books are a bit pricy but make great gifts and coffee table books plus the recipes are yummy

JD08
11-16-2010, 10:20 PM
I have a few bookmarked or are you looking for hard copy for a gift?

NUTZ
I'm just interested in a few basic recipes. It's getting nice outside and it's time to find ways to spend my weekends once football season is over.

landarc
11-16-2010, 10:27 PM
I have the Prudhomme Family Cookbook, which is interesting reading. It does have some recipes that are from Paul, but, many are from his siblings and mother.

The other books I have, are unfortunately not available in general distribution, they were books that were picked up in small shops compiled by local fisherman's associations. While this comment seems worthless upfront, I offer it because it is an excellent way to get recipes that are sub-regional and spring from the way locals cook for themselves.

Mister Bob
11-16-2010, 11:11 PM
A friend of mine from NOLA gave me a copy of his favorite. I've been using it for years now with great success.
The New Orleans Cookbook by Rima and Richard Collin
Hardcover ISBN 0-394-48898-9
Paperback ISBN 0-394-75275-9
The subtitle is long, but tells the story:
"The Most Authentic and Reliable Gathering of Great Cajun and Creole Recipes From the City's Grand Restaurants and Modest Cafes, From Mansions and From Country Kitchens"

yelonutz
11-17-2010, 12:25 AM
I'm just interested in a few basic recipes. It's getting nice outside and it's time to find ways to spend my weekends once football season is over.

One of my online favorites, and I don't share many!

NUTZ

http://www.nolacuisine.com/

BruceB
11-17-2010, 01:39 AM
http://www.gumbopages.com/recipe-page.html

Some very good recipes here also!

eddieh70301
11-17-2010, 06:00 AM
Try these links. John Folse's web site. Has alot of great recipes. Gumbo Pages is also a good source for Louisiana cooking. John Folse has a great recipe called Crawfish and Andouille Fettucini. It's really good. I've used the recipe and also substituted shrimp for the crawfish and it was excellent.

Gumbo Pages has a great jambalaya recipe that I use. IMO, Zatarains rice is what I use as it does not clump or stick together. If you can't get Zatarains rice, wally world has their version. It is par-boiled rice. give it a try.

http://www.jfolse.com/
http://www.gumbopages.com/recipe-page.html

Lake Dogs
11-17-2010, 08:20 AM
I'm trying to find a couple of cookbooks for Louisiana cuisine. I know there's a difference between New Orleans and Cajun, but I'm just looking for some basics like gumbo, jambalaya, and etouffee. I'd prefer to stick with more homestyle than gourmet recipes.

If there's any group of people that can answer any cooking question, it's the people here, so any and all suggestions are appreciated.


Different New Orleans to Cajun to Creole. Homestyle Cajun usually brings
in quite a bit of the creole influence. I ran into a great home style recipes
paperback book in the early 80's. When I get home tonight I'll look it up
for you.

Also, try the chicken fricassee. It's AMAZING.

bluetang
11-17-2010, 08:31 AM
I have enjoyed the recipes from "Justin Wilson's Homegrown Louisiana Cookin'". Nothing fancy. Just good stuff. :cool:
Me too, great book!

wildflower
11-17-2010, 08:47 AM
Justin Wilson, you be putting a little wine in the food and a little wine in you!! :laugh:

Geaux Tigers
11-17-2010, 12:07 PM
http://www.cajun-recipes.com/index.htm

4,500 cajun recipes on line

Louisiana Smoker
11-17-2010, 01:30 PM
Justin Wilson, you be putting a little wine in the food and a little wine in you!! :laugh:
I Gurrrrannnnteeee

bendosia
11-17-2010, 01:53 PM
I've used a few recipes off gumbopages and I can verify that they are awesome. Gumbo, jambalaya, and red beans and rice are great. I especially love red beans and rice.

1FUNVET
11-17-2010, 02:21 PM
Check "Marshes to Mansions" from the Junior League of Lake Charles.
www.jllc.net (http://www.jllc.net) Excellent cookbook :thumb: and its on sale thru November at 20% off on internet orders, normally 28.95. I bought 4 as gifts. I've had mine for the last 3 years. It'a a Regional Tabasco Community Cookbook Award Winner.

Also check out Pirates Panty from them.

landarc
11-17-2010, 02:54 PM
Funvet, that is the kind of cookbook I was talking about. They often have access to recipes that are unique to familes and locales you might no hear about otherwise.

1FUNVET
11-17-2010, 03:15 PM
Funvet, that is the kind of cookbook I was talking about. They often have access to recipes that are unique to familes and locales you might no hear about otherwise.


My first copy of Pirates Pantry was falling apart after 25 years of use so i had to replace it. It was my go to book till the new Marshes book came out. I don't think you will be disappointed.

caseydog
11-17-2010, 06:38 PM
Different New Orleans to Cajun to Creole. Homestyle Cajun usually brings
in quite a bit of the creole influence. I ran into a great home style recipes
paperback book in the early 80's. When I get home tonight I'll look it up
for you.

Also, try the chicken fricassee. It's AMAZING.

Cajun and creole have a lot in common, but I find cajun to be more "country comfort food," while creole is more fancy and shows more European influence.

When I lived in Port Arthur, Cajun was the dominant influence around there. You could find boudin cooking at most convenience stores. Cajun moms could make gumbo out of just about any critter down there. I would go duck hunting near Sabine Pass every winter, and those ducks would make a mighty fine gumbo.

I had Emeril's Real and Rustic, and it's pretty good. The ex-wife has it now, along with the Brennan's cookbook (with the original Bananas Foster recipe).

CD

Lake Dogs
11-17-2010, 06:55 PM
Cajun and creole have a lot in common, but I find cajun to be more "country comfort food," while creole is more fancy and shows more European influence.

When I lived in Port Arthur, Cajun was the dominant influence around there. You could find boudin cooking at most convenience stores. Cajun moms could make gumbo out of just about any critter down there. I would go duck hunting near Sabine Pass every winter, and those ducks would make a mighty fine gumbo.

I had Emeril's Real and Rustic, and it's pretty good. The ex-wife has it now, along with the Brennan's cookbook (with the original Bananas Foster recipe).

CD


Yep.

Oh, the book I was referencing and promised I'd find tonight:

CAJUN-CREOLE COOKING
by Terry Thompson
May 1987

Of the 15 reviews on Amazon, all 15 are 5 stars. One problem, it
was out of print for a while. I think they're back in print but now
VERY expensive. I (thankfully) have 2 paperbacks...

I've got books by Paul and Emeril and Justin and many others. However,
for the go-to recipes I always go to this book. Great sausage jambalaya
recipe and a chicken fricassee recipe to die for. I'm not thrilled with the
fish courtboullion recipe though. For that I suggest braising some fresh
water fish, make a nice dark roux based shrimp gumbo sans shrimp and
add the fish in late.

caseydog
11-17-2010, 09:57 PM
I went camping in Loo-see-ana a couple weeks ago. A bunch of us brought ingredients so the highest ranking coonass and her sue-shef (husband) could whup up a big-ole pot-o-gumbo. Chicken and sausage with some tasso that we had to get from Crystal Beach, Texas. It's getting hard to find that stuff.

But, the surprise of the weekend was on the last night, when one Loo-see-ana native pulled out some boudin and put it in a fish grilling basket and very slowly cooked it over the campfire. You have to go slow, or the casing will burst and the boudin will dry out.

When he was done, he let it rest, and cut it up to share. Oh my goodness, that stuff was awesome cooked that way. The casing (usually too tough to eat) was crispy, and the boudin was moist and so tasty.

I plan on doing some low and slow, indirect grilled boudin in the very near future. In fact, I already have the boudin.

CD

Oh, here's a little gumbo pr0n, with the sue-chef manning the paddle...

T-Man
11-18-2010, 11:44 PM
John Folse " Encyclopedia of Cajun and Creole Cuisine "
Chef John Besh " My New Orleans: The Cookbook "

Really good cookbooks ... Outstanding recipes , history and pic's...
Not cheap though . large coffee table type books...

brotherbd
11-19-2010, 12:43 AM
My wife and girls gave me a cookbook from these folks.

Has a lot of good stuff in it. We have enjoyed several dishes from it's pages.

Here's their site:

http://realcajunrecipes.com/

Enjoy!

Blessings,

brotherbd

ZILLA
11-19-2010, 10:10 AM
Paul Prudomes Louisiana Kitchen! It really is a great book. Talk About Good is another one but is simply a compilation with no explanations on technique. This is out of print but can be had very easy used. The recipes are very simple versions and are probably more authentic than the fancy cookbooks.

Homebrewed Q
11-19-2010, 10:32 AM
My Mom's side of the family is from Lafayette and Central LA so I grew up on Cajun/coona$$ food. I used to watch Justin Wilson's cooking shows and his recipes and techniques were the closest to our family's style.
Caseydog, smoked boudin (or boudain) is the way to go. I always throw some on for snacking when I'm slow smoking some proteins.