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View Full Version : Tri-Tip, RibEye (Prime), Pulled Pork


Desert Dweller
08-03-2010, 03:21 PM
I don't get it. Tri-Tip, what's the fascination? Nothing special. I got a call for a possible catering gig where the customer requested Tri-Tip. I spoke with a couple of good cooks about this cut of meat and decided to give it a go. I was at costco picking up some brisket and steaks so I grabbed a Tri-Tip. I created a marinade of Beef Broth, Stubbs Original BBQ Sauce, Montreal Steak and Garlic Powder. I marinaded about 20 hours and put it on w/Cherry and Pecan at 240 till it hit 140 internal. I tented it on a rack and in 15 minutes it rose to 147. Thin sliced and in my opinion only marginally better than a Choice Sirloin or London Broil. Any ideas, hints, suggestions?

While at Costco I picked up a pkg. of "prime" RibEyes. Just for some additional flavor I dipped them in the same marinade, sprinkled on some Bovine Bold and tossed them on the grill. Half a chimney of briquettes and some cherry for flavor. After about 10 minutes per side (yes, they were thick) I served up the perfect medium rare steak. Lettuce and tomato got called a salad and dinner was served. My friend Julie enjoyed it, and llittle "Lightfoot" was looking on hungrily.

I also did a butt for PP last week, so I put a pic or two of that in here too. Hope you enjoyed the pron as I did the food. Thx for looking in.

Chef Jim
08-03-2010, 03:49 PM
Nice, My butcher explained to me that a Tri-tip is part of the sirloin. That small piece at one end with the fat separating it from the rest of the cut. To get the Tri-Tip they cut it off before they slice the sirloin for steaks. I grilled one awhile back and it was real tasty. Just used my super secret seasoning. (SHHH S&P)

Smoothsmoke
08-03-2010, 03:56 PM
The food looks great. That tri-tip looks slightly awkwardly cut, kind of thin. Did you cut with or across the grain? Tri-tip is best grilled not smoked, of course IMO. No marinated needed, salt and pepper, maybe garlic and onion powder and you're good to go with the tri tip. Take it to 135-140 tops, let her rest a few then devour!

Again, your food looks awesome!

zydecopaws
08-03-2010, 04:05 PM
IMO, you overdid it with the marinade. I generally don't bother with marinade and do them Santa Maria style with a little salt, pepper, and some sort of garlic-based spice mixture. Then I used a reverse sear (thanks Landarc!) and pull them when they hit about 135F and let them rest for about 5-10 minutes before carving.

Here's an example:

http://noexcusesbbq.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/IMG_1401.JPG

Hyper
08-03-2010, 04:12 PM
Tri Tip is an extremely flavorful piece of meat on it's own. I cringe every time I see somebody marinate it or put rosemary or thyme or whatever on it. Also and as mentioned above, Tri Tip is a grilling meat, not a smoking meat. Lots of black pepper and a nice coating of Lawrys Seasoning Salt and you're good to go. Grill it on med/hi until medium rare/medium and let rest for 10 minutes. Slice and enjoy one of the best pieces of meat you will ever eat!!

J_Don
08-03-2010, 04:24 PM
All of it looked mighty fine to me.

Carbon
08-03-2010, 04:26 PM
I agree, tri-tips are best done Santa Maria style. Regardless, they all look darn good!

chambersuac
08-03-2010, 04:31 PM
I'd hit any/all of that.

dannypat21
08-03-2010, 04:49 PM
I have to admit I am not big on tri-tip either. It's just never that tender. Makes me wonder if I am doing it wrong, but I have followed the methods on here. Food looks great tho, especially those rib-eyes.

Ryan Chester
08-03-2010, 04:53 PM
First thing I notice is that you cut your tri-tip with the grain not across. I know you get more slices when you cut it with the grain but it comes out much more tender when cut across. Secondly, I would highly recommend (as others did) using some sort of dry rub (Santa Maria Style preferably) so you can get a nice crust. Lastly, try it grilled to 130-140 depending on how you like it and let rest for 10 minutes before cutting. I am positive you will change your mind about the cut.

Here is a review from one of our Brethren who does a lot of tri-tip.
http://thebbqgrail.com/2009/01/04/product-review-santa-maria-style-rub-from-the-rub-co/

Desert Dweller
08-03-2010, 05:19 PM
First thing I notice is that you cut your tri-tip with the grain not across.

Well, ya might wanna take another look...
If you look at the two pics of the tip on the grate, you will see the grain runs end to end, not across where I cut it.

Smoothsmoke
08-03-2010, 05:25 PM
It looks like across the grain. Try grilling it next time, I'm sure you'll love it.

Ryan Chester
08-03-2010, 05:27 PM
My appologies kind sir. Appeared that way on the small screen of my phone. I retract tip #1.:doh:

grillfella
08-03-2010, 05:28 PM
Bo, in my opinion tri tip is best cooked over a red oak fire, really gives it a robust smoky flavor

BuckSnort
08-03-2010, 05:56 PM
Food looks good... Not trying to argue with you hear but next time cut it across the grain... If you look at the very first pic you posted of it on the grill...You should cut exactly how the grill slats are...That is 90 deg. to the grain of the meat...

I cook tri tips a lot (doing one tonight in fact..lol) and I like them better with a simple rub of garlic salt season salt and LOTS of pepper...Grilled until med rare...

Hyper
08-03-2010, 06:12 PM
I cook tri tips a lot (doing one tonight in fact..lol) and I like them better with a simple rub of garlic salt season salt and LOTS of pepper...Grilled until med rare...

:clap2: :thumb:

Desert Dweller
08-03-2010, 06:24 PM
Well obviously the method of choice is grilling. My Bad. I can see where the diagonal from end to end cut is probably an exact cross grain cut; I had thought my cutting square against the end to end shape of the roast would be sufficient.

Actually the marinade was not the method recommended by my friends. Neil, BigMista said "Keep it simple..." Oh well, live and learn. My intention was to get that robust flavor Bill, (grillfella) mentioned. Try again next time I find one at a price I can live with. BTW Bill, PM me about the cost of the red oak...

gtsum
08-03-2010, 09:50 PM
food looks good, but why oh why did you marinate a prime ribeye??? I too prefer a dry rub on the tri tip, but hey, whatever floats your boat! Looks like you had a good dinner and a good time and thats all that matters!

Desert Dweller
08-03-2010, 10:40 PM
but why oh why did you marinate a prime ribeye???

I did not. I dipped it in the marinade for the tri-tip. Dipped, not marinaded. Obviously whatever I did was an experiment with flavor as the goal. I have no tastebuds to speak of, and it takes strong flavors to excite my palate.

BuckSnort
08-04-2010, 12:02 AM
DD, Teriyaki is also good on a tri tip...I just prefer a simple dry rub...

On a side note the two that I cooked tonight were already seasoned from the store...It was called BBQ Pepper Medley...I figured I would try it...It was great, I'll be buying that again..

Norcoredneck
08-04-2010, 03:37 AM
Seems we have glossed over all the details! ???
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=43729&stc=1&d=1280866821

Philly-QueMaster
08-04-2010, 04:55 AM
I agree, tri-tips are best done Santa Maria style. Regardless, they all look darn good!

What is Santa Maria style?

Desert Dweller
08-04-2010, 08:04 AM
Seems we have glossed over all the details! ???

You always were the observant one, Pat!

Harpo66
08-04-2010, 08:45 AM
What I see in Julie's face is. "Why am I posing for pictures when I could be eating this delicious looking steak." Am I right Bo?

Big George's BBQ
08-04-2010, 08:51 AM
Nice looking food Tri tip is on my to do list

garyk1398
08-04-2010, 08:57 AM
This whole Tri-tip thing must be a west coast deal because very few stores in my hood carry it. Anyway, I don't care what the people above me said :blah:, if Bo made it.... I'd hit it and don't give a hoot how it was sliced. I am more curious about the "details" though!:hug:

wlh3
08-04-2010, 10:18 AM
The only thing I can add to a lot of good tips on the tri tip is to get one that is untrimed. That is one lean tri tip you have. I try to allways get mine untrimed. Fat is flavor. Give it a little trim, put on you spices and cook. Before slicing for serving cut the charrred fat cap off and enjoy.
That is a mess of good looking foodies:grin:

gtsum
08-04-2010, 10:55 AM
I did not. I dipped it in the marinade for the tri-tip. Dipped, not marinaded. Obviously whatever I did was an experiment with flavor as the goal. I have no tastebuds to speak of, and it takes strong flavors to excite my palate.

gotcha...I must have misread it....I wish we could get tri tips out here on the east coast...very, very rarely have I ever seen one out here...Midwest I could always find them...I do like them..good change of pace from your "normal" cuts of beef

Desert Dweller
08-04-2010, 11:14 AM
if Bo made it.... I'd hit it and don't give a hoot how it was sliced.

That is one of the kindest, most generous compliments I have ever received Gary. Thx!

"Details" details... Nothing serious to report. Do not misunderstand, this is one very nice lady and a guy could do 90% worse, that is for sure. It's a little too soon after the divorce to think about getting involved right now. We date and enjoy each other's company. Took her with me on the bike to a comp in Prescott, AZ. Ask me again in another few months...

ChicagoSizzlin
08-04-2010, 11:18 AM
Nice looking food Tri tip is on my to do list


Same here havent had the pleasure of trying one of these. What they run a lb? I highly recommend Hanger Steaks if you can find them. Most tender piece of meat Ive had next to bone in ribeye.

Carbon
08-04-2010, 12:05 PM
What is Santa Maria style?

Simply rub with S&P and lots of garlic. Sear, turning frequently and gradually away from the heat until desired temp is reached.

Smoothsmoke
08-04-2010, 12:16 PM
Same here havent had the pleasure of trying one of these. What they run a lb? I highly recommend Hanger Steaks if you can find them. Most tender piece of meat Ive had next to bone in ribeye.

I purchase them between 2 and 3 bucks a pound when they're on sale.

Desert Dweller
08-04-2010, 02:45 PM
I purchase them between 2 and 3 bucks a pound when they're on sale.

$4.49 is the cheapest I have seen them here in AZ, and that is the on sale price. Usually around $4.99 pp

landarc
08-04-2010, 03:08 PM
Hi Bo, I was not gonna ask about the woman, figured you made no comment, I would make no comment. Now, on to the tri-tip.

I never marinade them for myself. I use a basic rub of kosher salt, black pepper, granulated garlic and dried orange or lemon zest in proportions of 1, 1, .5, .25 up to 1.5, 1.5, .5, .25.

I no longer grill them, which is against the norm of Santa Maria style, which I am well versed in. I prefer to smoke them for 1 to 2 hours at 225F or until I get internal temperatures of 220F to 225F. At this time, I dump a load of fresh lit coals into the kettle and get the temps up high and sear the outside. I want the internal no more than 130F maximum on the grill. Remove and rest under foil tent for 15 minutes.

For cutting, you have to cut each 'leg' of the tri-tip at different angles, the tri-tip grain switches angles at the bend, which is something of a bother.

Doing this, I have now cooked maybe 10 of these and each one has been meltingly tender yet very beefy. Here is a link to my latest effort

http://smoke-n-brew.blogspot.com/2010/06/tri-tip-and-catering.html

Bigmista
08-04-2010, 03:11 PM
Funny. I smoke mine and sell out daily.

Orygun
08-04-2010, 05:42 PM
Funny. I smoke mine and sell out daily.

I stand next to you Bigmista....I smoke mine and they are delicious and tender!

toumaj
08-04-2010, 05:49 PM
Give Tri Tips another chance.
Simplify the seasonings and sear it HOT for 3-5 minutes/side initially.
Then go indirect, add some wood and wait for the meat thermometer to hit 140...
ENJOY!!!

PS - If you can't tell, us Cali posters defend Tri Tip with everything we have:)

toumaj
08-04-2010, 05:51 PM
Funny. I smoke mine and sell out daily.

What temp/wood/time?
Much like Shearson Lehman, when Bigmista talks, people listen:cool:

Desert Dweller
08-04-2010, 10:46 PM
Funny. I smoke mine and sell out daily.
I was really hoping you would miss this thread. I should have taken the advice I asked for rather than trying to improve upon it, at least for the first time around...

big brother smoke
08-04-2010, 11:47 PM
I have been promoting the high heat smoke for years. Still use the high heat method and get raves. They simply cut like butter! Keep in mind, I cook over 2000 lbs. yearly and the greatest compliments I get comes from the high heat smoked stuff.

Chuckwagonbbqco
08-05-2010, 01:31 AM
I began my catering career in Santa Maria, CA in 1980. The ONLY thing I knew or cooked was Top Block or Tri-Tip on an open Santa Maria style pit. I sometimes cooked chicken for an optional meat. When anyone said "BBQ Pit" I assumed that it was an open pit.

In 1990 I attended a Farm Show in Stockton, CA and talked to Paul Melton, who was manufacturing and selling "Bushrod" smokers. He must have been a hell of a salesman because I bought the smoker although I laughed at it. I then started smoking tri-tip.

I am fortunate to own both a smoker capable of holding 4 cases of tri-tip and an open pit that will hold the same. I have learned the advantages of both.

The open "Santa Maria" style pit cooks much faster---as a caterer that is sometimes important. The open pit is "authentic" "Santa Maria" style, which is important to some customers. The sear and "back off" style of cooking causes a hard bark on the outside of the tri-tip which makes fast carving dificult. I cook with simple spices and simple methods---as "Santa Maria" style is intended.

BUT Wait----I have a smoker! Smoked tri-tip is awesome also. Customers weekly tell me "This is the best tri-tip that I have ever had." Whether it is smoked or grilled. Slow smoked tri-tip has no hard crust on the outside---it can be sliced quickly and evenly. Sugar or brown sugar can be added to the rub without burning on the outside. I love smoked tri-tip.

I agree with Big Brother Smoke and Bigmista about the merits of smoked tri-tip. However as a "Santa Maria" style purist---I also grill tri-tip. I am in California--99.9 % of all catering gigs are tri-tip. I have had one request for brisket in the last 5 years.
Catering on site is also a "Dog and Pony Show" and I usually use the open pit ---people can smell and SEE the meat cooking. The smoker is simply a big black object that smells good and the meat cannot be seen.

There are many ways to cook tri-tip and I have tried them all--grilling--smoking--fat on--fat off--searing--reverse searing--on a pitch fork over a fire for "Cowboy Fondue"--in a dutch oven--and other methods. I do not cook 1 tri-tip at a time--I cook cases. My favorite tri-tip to eat is smoked at 225 degrees and not seared.

My favorite way to cater is straight up "Santa Maria Style" using oak wood.
My own opinion is that most people try to improve on the "simplicity" of simple tri-tip cooking by putting in more steps and labor---but the improvements are in vain. I use tried and trued and old methods. It works for me.

BuckSnort
08-05-2010, 01:54 AM
For cutting, you have to cut each 'leg' of the tri-tip at different angles, the tri-tip grain switches angles at the bend, which is something of a bother.

Doing this, I have now cooked maybe 10 of these and each one has been meltingly tender yet very beefy. Here is a link to my latest effort

http://smoke-n-brew.blogspot.com/2010/06/tri-tip-and-catering.html

Good advice and dead on about the meat grain changing direction.. One other thing I have found is that the tri tips that are more round than elongated are better (Juicier and more tender) at least for me anyway...