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Sammy_Shuford
07-15-2010, 08:54 PM
Is de-barking better when green, or after dry?

I got handed 15 good size apple tree sections!

Saiko
07-15-2010, 09:02 PM
Why de-bark? It it's not moldy keep it on IMO.

SmokeJumper
07-15-2010, 09:14 PM
Bark is fine if not rotten. Lotsa threads on this one. A couple:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=80541&highlight=bark

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=68337&highlight=bark

campdude
07-15-2010, 09:16 PM
More work than you need to do as long as its dry - no bugs or mold. Have another beer in the time you saved!

FretBender
07-15-2010, 09:39 PM
Bark is not hard wood and not a good burn. It ma not affect a cook since it is only a very small portion of the flavor, but if you want to give that up so be it. Many old school pitmasters never considered the effects of bark, but only because they burned their wood down to embers before adding those coals to their pit. This is true for some pitmasters to date. Adding bark directly to a firebox can't help the taste of the food! If you think not, why not burn elm or any other wood that makes smoke and heat? Aswer: great flavor~

Papa Payne
07-15-2010, 10:04 PM
Bark is not hard wood and not a good burn. It ma not affect a cook since it is only a very small portion of the flavor, but if you want to give that up so be it. Many old school pitmasters never considered the effects of bark, but only because they burned their wood down to embers before adding those coals to their pit. This is true for some pitmasters to date. Adding bark directly to a firebox can't help the taste of the food! If you think not, why not burn elm or any other wood that makes smoke and heat? Aswer: great flavor~

Do you debark? If so, how? Tools? Draw knife or log wizard? Just curious. May try debarking for my next cook...

Thanks for sharing.

Papa

ZILLA
07-15-2010, 10:27 PM
Get rid of that overly smoky, fire retardent layer of cork ASAP!

SteelSmokin
07-15-2010, 10:32 PM
How do u do it? :confused:

colonel00
07-15-2010, 11:38 PM
I pull or pry off the thick bark from split logs of hickory and such. Usually that comes off fairly easily. Now, on a chunk of apple wood that has maybe come from a branch or other smaller chunk that is still "whole" with the full 2-3" diameter, the bark is usually so thin that it is harmless IMO. Plus, trying to get that paper bark off will be a futile battle. If it is a concern, you could pre-burn the offending bark.

barbefunkoramaque
07-15-2010, 11:45 PM
Bark is not hard wood and not a good burn. It ma not affect a cook since it is only a very small portion of the flavor, but if you want to give that up so be it. Many old school pitmasters never considered the effects of bark, but only because they burned their wood down to embers before adding those coals to their pit. This is true for some pitmasters to date. Adding bark directly to a firebox can't help the taste of the food! If you think not, why not burn elm or any other wood that makes smoke and heat? Answer: great flavor~

This will come as a huge surprise to mr Perez.

ZILLA
07-15-2010, 11:53 PM
Nasty round wood...

NorthwestBBQ
07-16-2010, 12:25 AM
"Re-barking smoking wood." There, I fixed it for you.

countyliner
07-16-2010, 06:33 AM
I take as much bark off as possible. After splitting and the wood dries a bit, the bark will usually come off with a good thump from a sledge hammer or the blunt end of a maul.
I do this because, from my experience, a) the bark usually has something else growing on it, ie, moss, vines, poison ivy... b) bugs, termites, centipedes, etc, like to set up residence under the bark and I dont want any bug poo getting into my food...c) bark holds moisture, speeding up the decomposition process.
Just my 2c

Smokesman
07-16-2010, 08:11 AM
How do u do it? :confused:

I debark applewood because I quess why take the chance - especially at a comp?!? Before splitting I just hold vertical a log on my chopping stump and use a really sharp hatchet to remove the bottom half of the bark - flip it over and do the other half - works great and still have all 10!

kickassbbq
07-16-2010, 11:59 AM
In 25 years of smoking, never have noticed the difference in taste with or without bark.
Burn it, it's wood, too.

On the other hand, I don't know Jack about anything!!!!

orangeblood
07-16-2010, 12:03 PM
what funk said is funny and true

FretBender
07-16-2010, 04:51 PM
This is much like the discussion of the best rub or sauce, or not use any at all, and opinions are like an anus, every so often a log comes out but that there's nothing bad about that!

Neil
07-16-2010, 06:04 PM
The only time I debark is if the bark is already falling off. Apple wood bark is so thin you don't need to mess with it.

Dave Russell
07-16-2010, 06:24 PM
There's plenty of other things I'd be concerned with before I'd worry about any thin fruitwood bark.

DennD
07-16-2010, 06:59 PM
I wasn't sure about the quality of smoke from bark, but if it comes off without much dificulty, I usually remove it unless it's very thin, paper-like bark. I cut up and split a bunch of wood from my woodpile today. Most all the pieces big enough to need splitting, the bark got knocked off in the process. Smaller round pieces, I usually throw on top of the coals in the chimney about five minutes before it all goes into the smoker.

BBQ_MAFIA
07-16-2010, 07:54 PM
I don't de-bark. It it falls off, it falls off. Other wise it stays on.

barbefunkoramaque
07-16-2010, 08:32 PM
There's plenty of other things I'd be concerned with before I'd worry about any thin fruitwood bark.

This is so true...

A guy can foil or not foil
cook hot and fast or low and slow
even use green wood or old moldy wood (like Zion) LOL
fat down or up or stupidly trimmed off
smoke flats only, forget to take the membrane off
soaked or unsoaked wood
but the minute he takes the probe and attempts to get an IT because he is gonna pull it a such and such Internal he has pretty much farked it up.

Bark matters when you pit is under 200 pounds. And even then, if your hotter than people were 2 years ago... it matters even less.

jestridge
07-16-2010, 09:17 PM
BBQ people are funny they worry about a little bark then turn around and use those charcoal briquettes with coal and other filler in them.

Mitch
07-17-2010, 07:37 AM
Bark or no bark - it goes in the firebox. I don't have the time to worry about bark. At my age, I have to spend the time looking for my lost beer:icon_blush:

Stevesonfire!
07-17-2010, 07:54 AM
That pic is worth a thousand words... Do you know how many beers it would take to debark my wood????:shocked:

surgem7
07-17-2010, 09:58 PM
BBQ I have ever eaten was done on "nasty round wood" SC scrub oak.

barbefunkoramaque
07-18-2010, 08:08 AM
Bark or no bark - it goes in the firebox. I don't have the time to worry about bark. At my age, I have to spend the time looking for my lost beer:icon_blush:

You left it ON the firebox. ssssssssssssssssssssssssSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS SBLAM!!!! SHHHHHHHHhhhhhhhhhhhhshhhshshhshssssssssssssssssss sssssssssss

Anyone ever left one on a big rigs firebox before.

I can't tell you how many damn plastic coffee mugs were set on my 600 degree firebox by still drunk competitors. It was one of the reasons I chose a round top for my Meat Mama design. LOL

Smokin Turkey
07-18-2010, 08:28 AM
This will come as a huge surprise to mr Perez.

Who is Mr. Perez? I've seen this picture of him in his woodpile before someplace. I want sideburns like that! Those are some funky BBQ sideburns!

campdude
07-18-2010, 10:04 AM
Bark or no bark - it goes in the firebox. I don't have the time to worry about bark. At my age, I have to spend the time looking for my lost beer:icon_blush:
You lose your beer??!!!! Better stop trying to do more than one thing at a time. Beer is to important!

42BBQ
07-18-2010, 04:44 PM
I KNOW I have less Que time than anyone else in this thread so take my words with a grain of salt. Been using seasoned, split applewood chunks for my Que. I only use two or three fist sized chunks that I cut from the split pieces on top of my charcoal. I have not bothered to debark them but noticed something when using the applewood. I get a rolling pale smoke for about 45 minutes when I first fire up, then it goes to sweet thin blue for the rest of the smoke. Don't know if the excess smoke is just from having wood mixed in or from having wood with a little bark mixed in. Debark next time to see if there is a difference.

thillin
07-18-2010, 05:25 PM
Who is Mr. Perez? I've seen this picture of him in his woodpile before someplace. I want sideburns like that! Those are some funky BBQ sideburns!

Pitmaster at Smitty's BBQ in Lockhart, TX

Kevin
07-18-2010, 05:47 PM
Most of the time I cook with Red Oak, no charcoal. If the bark falls off when I split, then it does not go into the fire. If it does not fall off, it goes into the fire. A clean burning fire is more important to me.

BBQ Grail
07-18-2010, 06:33 PM
I only de-bark dogwood...

FretBender
07-18-2010, 08:57 PM
I'd like to de-bark my neighbors dog, but that's a different story and don't want to hijack the thread! /woof~

barbefunkoramaque
07-18-2010, 09:00 PM
As people in my neck of the woods use all sorts of pecan and hickory I am always asked why my bbq has that natural smoked taste... I realize they just mean "gentle" or Mild but it is due to my red oak

Most of the time I cook with Red Oak, no charcoal. If the bark falls off when I split, then it does not go into the fire. If it does not fall off, it goes into the fire. A clean burning fire is more important to me.

River City Smokehouse
07-18-2010, 09:05 PM
Over the years I have heard a lot of "Do This, Don't do thats". I never could tell any difference in whether there was bark or not. I always preheated my wood and it didn't lay there and smolder. I think that is where you run into problems with the bark. Of course mold isn't good either.

Kevin
07-18-2010, 09:12 PM
Over the years I have heard a lot of "Do This, Don't do thats". I never could tell any difference in whether there was bark or not. I always preheated my wood and it didn't lay there and smolder. I think that is where you run into problems with the bark. Of course mold isn't good either.

Pre heat? Yes, by all means. I use a small cooker and my fire is small. I have a nice clean burning fire at the opening to the cook chamber and pre heat chunks at the other end of the fire box. These pre heated chunks ignite immediately when moved over to the fire end.

River City Smokehouse
07-18-2010, 09:21 PM
And the wood goes straight to flame with little or NO smoke.

Smokesman
07-19-2010, 12:20 PM
I've never considered pre-heating before. For the first time at Kettering I had some apple wood chunks on one of our WSM's that would not stop giving off crappy white smoke - remove it from the fire and blue smoke baby - ended up just tossing 2 or 3. I think it may have been the humidity over night - high dew point low temp so it was clammy and damp out. Wondering if preheating woods chunks would be worthwhile on a WSM using RO lump?

MilitantSquatter
07-19-2010, 05:51 PM
Pitmaster at Smitty's BBQ in Lockhart, TX

I think you meant Kreutz Market.

thillin
07-19-2010, 06:26 PM
I think you meant Kreutz Market.

Your right. That's what I get for posting from work on a Sunday.

seattlepitboss
07-19-2010, 09:25 PM
I use nearly all cherry wood these days. One thing about it is it can be tough to split by hand because the bark is strongly cross-connected, making it like it's wearing Kevlar. I slit the bark on tough logs and then they split great where the slit was.

If you want no bark, split wedges, then do a 3rd split removing all the outer part. I generally split mine down to wrist-size splits anyway. Then stack it until it's bone dry and warm it up a little before tossing logs in. Start right up, blue smoke city.

I was smoking with two Banderas the other day, started one before the other. Here's a pic of one ready to go (thin blue smoke) right in front of one that isn't (thick white smoke).

seattlepitboss

barbefunkoramaque
07-20-2010, 08:22 AM
Your right. That's what I get for posting from work on a Sunday.

Its okay.... he worked for Kreutz before there was a smittys and then kreutz became smittys and kreutz became kreutz. See, today there is Kreutz which is the oldest bbq biz in a new building while smittys is new in the oldest bbq building. its was a debacle that a judge had to figure our cuminating in a battle over wheelbarrowing old coals from the new smittys in the old kreutz building over down the the street to the new old kreutz building.

whew!

thillin
07-20-2010, 09:01 PM
Its okay.... he worked for Kreutz before there was a smittys and then kreutz became smittys and kreutz became kreutz. See, today there is Kreutz which is the oldest bbq biz in a new building while smittys is new in the oldest bbq building. its was a debacle that a judge had to figure our cuminating in a battle over wheelbarrowing old coals from the new smittys in the old kreutz building over down the the street to the new old kreutz building.

whew!

I'll be eating at both next week. Probably Blacks as well. Yearly detour on the was to San Antonio.:becky:

Hugh Jorgan
07-21-2010, 12:41 PM
Seems as if I have read on here about some one that uses ONLY the bark for some smokes. I have never removed it or seen it removed from any smoking wood unless it had lichen or something growing on it, or if it were rotting. I use or have used apple, plum, oak, hickory, pecan and others without removing the bark with no problems.

jestridge
07-21-2010, 01:14 PM
I preheat my wood like this
http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh128/jestridge/DSCN9872.jpg