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HellsHalfAcreGriller
07-08-2010, 05:01 PM
Ok, if this has been covered in some dramatic detail before, kindly direct me to the proper thread archive.

I have always used kingsford and matchlight charcoal. However, I have seen several other flavors around, red oak being one of them, which has piqued my curiosity in the differences and desire to try it. Red Oak claims to be a hardwood charcoal.

If thats the case, what is Kingsford made of?

What qualities makes Kingsford so good? Others?

What situations would you use different briquettes, or would you use one for everything?

Hope I dont stir up any :boxing: matches, but if so, keep'em clean and above the belt.:becky:

Thanks for the info oh mighty BBQOracles!!

Robert.

KSims1868
07-08-2010, 05:13 PM
I don't really ever think about changing my coal.
I use Royal Oak lump or Kroger lump...depending on what I have handy. I don't buy anything else but these 2 and truth be told...I think RO makes Kroger's lump for them. What I will change is the type of wood chunks I put in the coal basket. Usually hickory, but sometimes mesquite. I've used apple once, but I need to try apple and cherry chunks again.

I never use briquettes...ever.

Bartstop
07-08-2010, 05:26 PM
http://old.cbbqa.org/wood/Kingsford.html


I use Kingsford in my WSM and I also use it on my OTG unless I'm doing something that need really high heat, then I use Frontier Lump. Also, if I screwed up and put too little fuel in the WSM and need to add fuel, I'll add Frontier to the coals. Never add unlit kingsford unless your meat is foiled. It will give it a nasty taste.

FretBender
07-08-2010, 06:35 PM
http://old.cbbqa.org/wood/Kingsford.html


I use Kingsford in my WSM and I also use it on my OTG unless I'm doing something that need really high heat, then I use Frontier Lump. Also, if I screwed up and put too little fuel in the WSM and need to add fuel, I'll add Frontier to the coals. Never add unlit kingsford unless your meat is foiled. It will give it a nasty taste.

That's the main reason I NEVER use briquettes. They contatin binders and fillers that are not hardwoods and, actually, not even wood. Kingsford was developed to make use of the wooden crates that were once used in the early automobile industry, and to form them a "glue" was added to make them hold thier shape. The taste from these glues and binders comes out when they burn. Same reason I never use matchlight or and type of petroleum based lighter fluid. Only a chimney with starter newspaper or kissed with a propane torch. The lump charcoal is all wood, no chemicals, binders or fillers. It's actually much like the old pitmasters had after burning down their logs in a fire box, then shoveling the glowing embers into their pits to cook. Check out the charcoal index at the "Naked Whiz". You'll learn quite a bit about charcoal!

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/lump.htm

Captain P.J.
07-08-2010, 06:52 PM
Great website Fret!!

Chef Jim
07-08-2010, 11:49 PM
Naked Whiz is the place to go. I like lump and can only get Cowboy, well that's not true, it's just easier to get. Some people hate it some don't. It works for me. I have only tried Kingsford a few times, Cause it was really cheap!

NCGrimbo
07-09-2010, 09:45 AM
Ok, if this has been covered in some dramatic detail before, kindly direct me to the proper thread archive.

I have always used kingsford and matchlight charcoal. However, I have seen several other flavors around, red oak being one of them, which has piqued my curiosity in the differences and desire to try it. Red Oak claims to be a hardwood charcoal.

If thats the case, what is Kingsford made of?

What qualities makes Kingsford so good? Others?

What situations would you use different briquettes, or would you use one for everything?

Hope I dont stir up any :boxing: matches, but if so, keep'em clean and above the belt.:becky:

Thanks for the info oh mighty BBQOracles!!

Robert.

Robert,

There a several great threads about using lump vs. briquettes. Just do a search on charcoal or lump.

In my opinion, it comes down to what you like to use. Some people can taste a difference between lump and briquettes due to the binders used in the briquettes. Personally, I can't. But I use lump anyway since it leaves less ash to clean up when the cooking is over.

As for the matchlight, take the advice of your tag line and get rid of it. You'll tank me later. :wink:

1FUNVET
07-09-2010, 09:50 AM
To me using matchlight is like boiling your ribs and using liquid smoke :hand:

Jester
07-09-2010, 09:56 AM
Kroger lump

I had no idea that Kroger sold lump charcoal. How does their price compare to other lump manufactures? It would be a heck of a lot more convenient to get it here versus Buffalo Hardware.

HellsHalfAcreGriller
07-09-2010, 11:28 AM
Thanks to all of you who have contributed. I understand about match light, personally I don't use it anymore because of the heavy petroleum smell I can smell. I have always used kingsford, but wanted to get informative replies, hence the questions. I believe I will switch to lump charcoal if I can find it. Basically all we have around here is Walmart, Tractor Supply, or Rural King for any kind of outdoor supplies.

I will do more research on this. Thanks again and I appreciate the informative and succinct replies!!

Grill ON!!

Robert.

Coltrain
07-09-2010, 12:06 PM
I personally use lump 90% of the time. I talked to a guy that worked at the Springfield, OR Kingsford plant for many years. He told me that AT LEAST 90%-95% of the wood used in Kingsford is Douglas Fur - followed by Pine, then Alder, then Madrone, and finally oak. He said they would hardly ever get oak in at the plant. The mix of woods being used was never the same. Trucks would come in and dump their load of scraps from the lumber mills and loaders would push it into big mixed piles. When the plant needed more wood, they would just scoop out of the mixed pile and dump it into the plant - bark and all. It would run through a furnace and get "charred" and then got mixed with a hot coal paste and formed into the briquets.

I don't know if the guy was just blowing smoke, but for a plant that produces 150,000 tons of charcoal a year, the northwest seems like a bad location if your using hardwoods...

Smoothsmoke
07-09-2010, 12:11 PM
How about for WSM's? Is it feasible to get 10 hours using lump, using the minion method without having to refill the basket? Oh a WSM 22.5" that is. I do not have it yet, but seriously thinking of purchasing one.

toumaj
07-09-2010, 12:33 PM
How about for WSM's? Is it feasible to get 10 hours using lump, using the minion method without having to refill the basket? Oh a WSM 22.5" that is. I do not have it yet, but seriously thinking of purchasing one.

Just bot it - do yourself a favor and get one.
It's perfect if you'd prefer to play Cornhole while cooking versus standing over the fire all day!