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View Full Version : Need Advice. Drum's former contents


JimGass
06-23-2010, 09:21 PM
Hey guys, I need some advice please. This forum has me pumped up to do some smoking, and it seems like the UDS is going to be my next toy. Got on Craigslist today and found a guy nearby that will sells 55 gallon drums for 5 bucks a pop. I emailed him to ask what they once contained, and his response was that they used to hold "light grade oils." I asked him for clarification, whether by light grade he meant olive oil, mineral oil, 5w20 motor oil etc. his response was "like motor oil but lighter." This sounds like something I may not want to cook in, dunno.

Question is this: is there anything, short of radioactive waste, that won't properly burn off of one of these things?

Is something like this what's common? Where do people find their drums? Is burning off the plastic layer of say an apple juice barrel common, or is an actual oil drum the standard?

I read "the thread" on UDS for a few hours, but only made it maybe a tenth of the way through the thread. Apologies if this is a question that is answered many times already on the site.

Thanks!

Jim

McGurk
06-23-2010, 10:01 PM
At 5 bucks a pop, it's worth buying one and finding out if they're in good shape. Colored liners mean they will be safe to use, but a bear to get smoker-ready. If he meant "light weight oil" (a thin, low viscocity lubricant), it's no worse than motor oil and can probably be used with a good burn or two and some light grinding. A lot of people will say that you need a food grade drum, but frankly a motor oil drum is a whole lot easier and IMHO no worse for you as a smoker WITH PROPER CLEANING AND PREP.

Hose it out with some clear water and empty it, then rinse and empty a few more times. See what comes out, and if it has any characteristics that you don't like. If it seems pretty noxious there are some tricks to cutting the lid off without an explosion, like filling it completely with water or car exhaust. Best case scenario is if they have a removable lid and clamp. Good Luck!

JimGass
06-23-2010, 11:27 PM
Thanks for that advice. So, even motor oil having been in the drum is okay? You say proper cleaning. That means a couple of really hot burns and a grinding? how do I grind it?

Thanks!

Jim

mrice2311
06-23-2010, 11:32 PM
I use a wire brush attachment on a drill and it grinds very well on the inside of a drum.

McGurk
06-23-2010, 11:52 PM
Verify safety of contents, remove top, drill intake holes, and BURN BURN BURN! After cooling, ash removal, and a rinse, you now need to get it clean. As said, a grinding wheel of some sort is recommended. I used a 4 1/2" angle grinder with a braided cup brush. Other use a 1/2" drill with a braided grinding wheel (some even extend it out for ease of use with some all-thread).

Burk
06-24-2010, 12:03 AM
At 5 bucks a pop, it's worth buying one and finding out if they're in good shape. Colored liners mean they will be safe to use, but a bear to get smoker-ready. If he meant "light weight oil" (a thin, low viscocity lubricant), it's no worse than motor oil and can probably be used with a good burn or two and some light grinding. A lot of people will say that you need a food grade drum, but frankly a motor oil drum is a whole lot easier and IMHO no worse for you as a smoker WITH PROPER CLEANING AND PREP.

Hose it out with some clear water and empty it, then rinse and empty a few more times. See what comes out, and if it has any characteristics that you don't like. If it seems pretty noxious there are some tricks to cutting the lid off without an explosion, like filling it completely with water or car exhaust. Best case scenario is if they have a removable lid and clamp. Good Luck!


^^^^ Yeah, that.

I used a motor oil drum for my UDS. Hit it with a degreaser and power washer, a good burn, and the power washer again. There was no petroleum residue or odor. No need for grinders and wire wheels. We had a drum deheader at work, but I've used a sharp cold chisel and hammer to make burn barrels. It's not too tough and a lot safer than risking an explosion.