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View Full Version : Got a new large trailer pit, firebox question


bigracksbbq
03-16-2010, 11:04 PM
http://www.lonestarcustompits.com/Royal.html

Picked it up today, going to use it for our restaurant for catering, special events, etc. Brought it home tonight to play with it. I have zero experience with a pit anywhere this size. Had no charcoal at the house, so tried to get it up to speed with the oak it was delivered with.

Anyone have any suggestions where to start? Tonight in my small amount of spare time I fired it up with 8 split pieces, got it to 275, it quickly dropped, threw on a few more pieces, up to 300, then quickly dropped. Any suggestions? Im assuming charcoal will help to keep the temps up and more consistent.

jonboy
03-17-2010, 06:46 AM
WOW.
NICE SMOKER.
Check out the videos from pitmaster t...

http://www.youtube.com/user/PopdaddysBBQ#p/u/9/PvLrhCdmLoA

This is one about getting your pit up and running.
Look around his site and you will find a lot of info.
Put on a pair of funky glasses before you go...
jon

bocephus
03-17-2010, 08:19 AM
I was thinking the same thing, that is a great video and seems like it helps, I think the main thing to rembember is that you want a good bed of hot coals, don't rush it

ialsohaveadream
03-17-2010, 09:28 AM
really nice rig, congratulations

kickassbbq
03-17-2010, 10:00 AM
It is very difficuly to and takes a long time to get a really HOT bed of coals starting with wood, unless it is split really small.
Start with SMALL pieces and work your way up to logs in a pit that size.
In my Lang, I start with about 1/2 large bag of briquttes. Get them REALLY hot and THEN start adding wood.
Practice a little. You'll get there!!!!!

Chef Jim
03-17-2010, 10:28 AM
OMG What a rig! :clap2: Wish you the best with the restaurant.

luke duke
03-17-2010, 10:48 AM
You might want to look into a Stoker or a Guru since it is a catering rig. This will allow you to be more consistent and also allow less experienced employees to tend the pit.

pahutchens
03-17-2010, 12:26 PM
Sweet rig maybe some local TX DFW Brethren can help you on the curve

bigracksbbq
03-17-2010, 02:05 PM
Thanks for all the info guys!

big brother smoke
03-17-2010, 02:30 PM
It is very difficuly to and takes a long time to get a really HOT bed of coals starting with wood, unless it is split really small.
Start with SMALL pieces and work your way up to logs in a pit that size.
In my Lang, I start with about 1/2 large bag of briquttes. Get them REALLY hot and THEN start adding wood.
Practice a little. You'll get there!!!!!

This is how I roll as well with my pit. You got a big hunk of steel to keep warm, Nice weapon Bro!:clap2:

bigracksbbq
03-17-2010, 09:46 PM
Fired it up today, did a brisket, some beef ribs, and a pork tenderloin. Will post some pics in a bit, just waiting for the briskey to finish cooking in the cooler!

Mattzilla
03-18-2010, 04:06 AM
Not to be an a$$ but....25k and you have to ask questions on how to use it? Maybe a smaller and easier smoker would have been better?

Damn nice pit.

kickassbbq
03-18-2010, 07:03 AM
Can't learn without having one to practice on.

When I bought my Lang, I had never even been close to a large smoker. Now, it's the easiest smoker I have to crank and run!!!

River City Smokehouse
03-18-2010, 07:26 AM
You might want to look into a Stoker or a Guru since it is a catering rig. This will allow you to be more consistent and also allow less experienced employees to tend the pit.
This pit is not air tight. It is a pit that was once built by Bates Pits and they are not air tight. I have had two of these and still have one of them. If you put a GURU or any type of draft induction system the fire will run away from you unless you make it air tight. I always started my fire with a 10 lb. bag of charcoal and used wood that I preheated on the firebox from there. You will have to add wood about every two hours to keep up with it. If you use barkless wood and preheat it, it will give you a clean burn. I might add....be smart and unhook the gas on the log lighter. It is a accident waiting to happened. Unless they started putting a thermocoupler on them. I learned the hard way.

tjus77
03-18-2010, 08:25 AM
nice rig for sure. good bed of coals is the key, I would bet once you have that, it won't be hard to keep up to temp. also remember to place your firebox upwind to get the draft going. I was at an informal cookoff once, about midnight the wind shifted and I was in the truck sleeping. Woke up at the appointed time to add wood and the fire was almost out. Couldn't figure out what happened and couldn't get the fire stoked up to save my life. Finally hooked back up to the trailer and swung it around, started working great. NICE rig by the way

CBQ
03-18-2010, 11:28 AM
I love my Stoker, but I wouldn't use a Stoker or Guru with a large wood fire. These devices regulate pit temp by controlling the fire draft. They work great with fires that are primarily charcoal, but if you have a big wood fire it's likely to smoulder if when the draft is off for a long time, and a smouldering fire will create a layer of bitter tasting creosote on your meat. Regular the temp by running with the draft doors open all the way and adding small amounts of wood to hit the temp you want.