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BBQ Grail
09-12-2009, 11:19 PM
Okay, pizza experts...

My dear wife is seeking a recipe for pizza crust. Thin...thin...thin.

It's not as simple as just rolling out the normal pizza crust? Or is it. We are talking thin, like cracker type crust.

Suggestions...

Recipes...

Tips...

Brian in So Cal
09-12-2009, 11:24 PM
What time should I be over to try it?

landarc
09-12-2009, 11:26 PM
PM sent Grail, I was gonna post it, but it is a long verbose recipe. It is also a matter of using it warm and relaxed, working it slowly and gently moving the edge out slowly. And you will definitely need a well heated pizza stone and a slippery peel.

Saiko
09-12-2009, 11:28 PM
I'll post my recipe for pizza dough tomorrow, it's getting late and I'm too lazy to wander downstairs and copy the recipe. All pizza dough recipes are pretty similar: A high protein flour (usually just bread flour), water, yeast, salt, and a little olive oil.
The dough recipe is going to be the same, thick or thin. For a thin crust (which I prefer), I just use a regular rolling pin and roll it out as thin as I can get it. You have to be patient, if it keeps wanting to snap back, just let it sit for a bit then give it another go.
It's really easy to make your own dough if you have a kitchen-aid type mixer with a dough hook.

Ron_L
09-12-2009, 11:30 PM
I made pizzas a while ago using the largest flour tortillas I could find. I precooked some of the toppings since the crust cooked quickly, but they were great. Very thin and very crispy...

leanza
09-12-2009, 11:34 PM
If you want your crust thin, use a rolling pin with pressure.

BBQ Grail
09-12-2009, 11:41 PM
Celeste makes some awesome pizza dough from scratch so maybe it's just rolling it out.

BBQchef33
09-12-2009, 11:48 PM
i never roll my dough.. first push it out flat, working from the center out to the edge and try not to trap any air in the dough.. once its stretched slightly and shaped, pick it up and stretch it over the top of your wrists and stretch the dough, hand over hand letting the weight of the dough stretch it out.. work it slowly, make sure the dough is room temp and dont go to fast. keep working it and you can get it nearly translucent.

Grillman
09-12-2009, 11:58 PM
I have always made Thin crust pizza, from regular Pizza Dough.

Like others have said use Pressure and roll it out SUPER thin...if it keeps
shrinking back....let it sit for at least 5 minutes; and then roll it out
further.
Then "Dock" the dough..you can use a fork; or two forks back-to-back,
and punch LOTS of holes in the dough to keep it from rising.
Or; if you are lazy like me...you can buy a "Dough Docker" ....and in a few
seconds you will have Hundreds of holes in no time.

If you want it even crisper....pre-bake the crust by itself on the stone
fore about 30-45 seconds on each side....then put the toppings on it
and bake normally.

Below is a picture of a "Dough Docker" for Pizzas.

http://s45.radikal.ru/i110/0909/c0/2b2aeac93bf2.jpg (http://www.radikal.ru)

Single Fin Smoker
09-13-2009, 12:35 AM
Use Pita. At my house, we all love it. You can even cut them in halves, and have them even thinner(not to mention at the day old bread store here in HB a pack costs $1.39). Wheat Pita's are even healthier. They crisp up real nice on the pizza stone on the weber. Easy too.
I should take pics one day.....

Cast Iron Chef
09-13-2009, 12:44 AM
If you don't want to make home made the Pillsbury dough that comes is a can like biscuits really is pretty good. Roll as thick or thin you want. Toppings make the difference. If you have a Fresh-n-Easy in your part of the world their pizza dough is very good. Just need to use same day and keep it cold until use.

rolf
09-13-2009, 02:02 AM
No knead pizza dough, easy, the long wait makes for a good flavor. Just google "no knead pizza dough".

Rightstuff
09-13-2009, 02:11 AM
http://www.pizzamaking.com/thincrust.php

Northwoods Smoke
09-13-2009, 02:55 AM
Basically, you want to push out all of the air pockets out of the dough...

That is why you roll. You are killing all potential air pockets in the dough, which will creates that thin, crackery crust.

Professionals use a sheeter, as evidenced in the link above. Home cooks use a rolling pin for the similar effect. Docking the dough with a docker or a fork will double your effort in not having any air in the crust.

The biggest problem to rolling out a dough (espcially thin crust) is 'stickage'. You want to keep your board floured with a mixture of high gluten flour and semolina. Once you've got the crust rolled out properly and placed on a dusted peel, you want to dress it very simply to start.

You've got a wafer thin crust now, so don't be putting 5 lbs of toppings on it and expect it to slide right off. Start with some sauce (just enough to cover). Shake the peel slightly to make sure it isn't sticking. Put a little cheese on there (I recommend a mixture of cheeses including but not limited to Mozz, Provi, Muenster, Asiago, and or Parm), but go light on the cheese. Shake the peel a little as you go to make sure it the pie is still movable without killing the shape trying to get it on the stone. If you must, put one more ingredient on, but not much and get that darn pie to the stone. Shake a little before you open the oven (or grill) and mount that bad boy on your stone.

Great pies are an art form, just like great BBQ. Mastery comes with practice and patience. Good luck!

1_T_Scot
09-13-2009, 05:26 AM
You might want to cheat with the peel and use parchment paper

Rick's Tropical Delight
09-13-2009, 08:07 AM
i think you have to be Italian for it to work. :biggrin:

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=68301

bbqbull
09-13-2009, 08:55 AM
Try here http://www.pizzamaking.com

Northwoods Smoke
09-13-2009, 09:33 AM
P.S. There is a fine balance between too little and too much flour on the dough. You want just enough that it will move freely, but not so much that when you eat it you get a big mouthful of flour.

The trick is to knock off some of the flour by tossing the dough back and fourth between your hands. One of the reasons this technique is employed is to stretch the dough, but the other reason is you are knocking off some of the excess flour.

Check out some of Tony Gemignani's (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=tony+gemignani&search_type=&aq=0&oq=tony+gemi) pizza videos on You Tube. He has some excellent professional level instruction (as opposed to some of the homemade pizza videos there).

C Rocke
09-13-2009, 11:30 AM
So thin it only has one side?

Ashmont
09-13-2009, 11:39 AM
Google Imo's Pizza crust..... It a STL thang.....

Roo-B-Q'N
09-13-2009, 11:44 AM
Larry, all crusts are not the same, they all have their own characteristics and ways of wroking with them.
I highly recommend a book called American Pie by Peter Reinhart. He is also the auhor of Bread Bakers apprentice which I would also recommend. But back to the pizza.
First part of the book is his "hunt" for the best pizza and he takes you on his journey from NY to Arizona to Italy and back. Don't go right to the recipes without reading the first part. The second part is the recipes for dough, sauces and toppings.
We make the thin or roman style almost exclusively. However the Napalitno style is awesome as well.
I love the book!

landarc
09-13-2009, 12:42 PM
So thin it only has one side?
I have done this and it is not the best way to go.

SgtFubar
09-13-2009, 01:41 PM
I agree with Ashmont, Imo's pizza is the best & only example of a thin crust pizza, it is "the square beyond compare"

MilitantSquatter
09-13-2009, 02:05 PM
I'm with Phil on this one... DON'T roll out the dough !!! You'll never see the best pizza places in NYC use a rolling pin or a dough docker and they get very thin crusts. I think it's the quality/type of the dough used, the fermentation period and the ability of the pizzamaker to stretch properly that dictates the thickness.

A rolled dough just makes for a dull pizza without character.

Watch Dom Demarco of Difara (Brooklyn) or Chris Bianco of Pizzeria Bianco (Phoenix but from the Bronx) stretch a pie... boring but effective. if you want to spin for show, you need a very dry dough, lots of gluten and a shorter fermentation period

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNKeF5gNh1E&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo%2Egoogle%2Ecom%2Fvideosear ch%3Fq%3Ddi%2Bfara%2Bpizza%26hl%3Den%26emb%3D0%26a q%3Df&feature=player_embedded#t=51 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNKeF5gNh1E&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo%2Egoogle%2Ecom%2Fvideosear ch%3Fq%3Ddi%2Bfara%2Bpizza%26hl%3Den%26emb%3D0%26a q%3Df&feature=player_embedded#t=51)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-t4xkUUjvk&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo%2Egoogle%2Ecom%2Fvideosear ch%3Fq%3Dchris%2Bbianco%26hl%3Den%26emb%3D0%26aq%3 Df&feature=player_embedded