PDA

View Full Version : oak


baldbill
09-09-2009, 11:56 PM
How does oak compare to hickory, pecan, fruitwoods? Is it onthe mild side or does it impart a strong flavor to the meat. I use primarily pecan and apple but have access to plenty of oak. ALso, which variety is best of does it matter ( white oak, red, wateroak etc). THanks in advance,
baldbill

" slinging wood in the neighborhood":mrgreen:

blues_n_cues
09-10-2009, 12:16 AM
white or red w/ some pecan over a slow low direct(or indirect) heat will give you....texas BBQ. it's world famous & infamous....depends on what yer cooking on or what meat yer cooking w/- ya can't beat it.
if ya got a brick pit....

i'm sure funk will fill in alot more of the rest....

mrwicks
09-10-2009, 01:03 AM
oak is the shizzle......light smoke....lighter than hickory .... i usually use oak and apple... very versatile combination with mild smoke flavor

indianagriller
09-10-2009, 01:32 AM
I have had good luck with 2 parts oak / 1 part cherry,hickory,or pecan.

Hugh Jorgan
09-10-2009, 01:40 AM
I haven't used it for a flavor wood, but usually cook with mostly Hickory with a few pieces of oak mixed in over the course of the cook. That's is when we do whole hog and use a burn barrel and shovel coals to the cooker.

I think it burns consistently like the hickory if seasoned. Big coal chunks and long burn times with good air management.

mrwicks
09-10-2009, 01:41 AM
a fresh cut piece smells like barbecue sauce

Northwoods Smoke
09-10-2009, 08:11 AM
Not to highjack, but does anyone have a good source for oak chunks?

garyk1398
09-10-2009, 08:23 AM
Don't want to highjack either, but I think this is a good subject to discuss. Does any type of oak work for smoking meats; for example, Bur oak or pin oak, etc.?

NCGuy68
09-10-2009, 08:35 AM
I stick with red and white oak. Tryed pin one time and it seemed 'musty' to me.

Northwoods Smoke
09-10-2009, 10:29 AM
Also, is 'post oak': red, white or other?

Lake Dogs
09-10-2009, 10:47 AM
Im there with NCGuy68. White oak preferable; not quite as strong a smoke flavor,
but yet still pronounced. I'm not certain what type of oak I used last time, but was
a variant of red oak (probably pin oak). It had a peculiar smell, almost musty. The
flavor was GREAT, but the smell set us back. Very strange....

Northwoods Smoke
09-10-2009, 06:38 PM
Also, is 'post oak': red, white or other?

Can any 'oaksperts' chime in on this?

Paulie G.
09-10-2009, 11:54 PM
I stick with red and white oak. Tryed pin one time and it seemed 'musty' to me.
I cook almost exclusively with oak. red is preferred but i'll go with white when its all i can get.

Fastball
09-11-2009, 12:37 AM
I have only used Post Oak and BlackJack Oak. These type of Oaks are heavier smoke than hickory. I primarily use hickory and pecan for this reason. Blackjack, however, makes for a very hot fire, and has a longer burn time (i.e. coals last longer), so if you are looking to do hot and fast, it's the way to go. I will use blackjack on occasion, but not often as I hate cutting it (it will eat up a chainsaw chain in no time flat).

bbqfans
09-11-2009, 12:38 AM
I'll chime in..... I'm sure Funky will agree>>>>>:)-
I grew up in Central Texas and used primarily Post oak and Live Oak(Big).
It was an excellent source of heat(long burning ) and just enough smoke as to be "nice".
Now, I used Mesquite a lot ,but Oak was my go to wood for long cooks,for heat/flavor:tongue:
Here in Ohio,White Oak is avaliable,and is some what lighter in flavor than the Southern varieties. It is still a good heat source for long smokings.
I now use a lot of Fruit,Maple and Hickory; supported by Oak when I get it,yeah-good wood!

4TheLoveofBrisket
09-11-2009, 06:11 AM
I'll chime in..... I'm sure Funky will agree>>>>>:)-
I grew up in Central Texas and used primarily Post oak and Live Oak(Big).
It was an excellent source of heat(long burning ) and just enough smoke as to be "nice".
Now, I used Mesquite a lot ,but Oak was my go to wood for long cooks,for heat/flavor:tongue:
Here in Ohio,White Oak is avaliable,and is some what lighter in flavor than the Southern varieties. It is still a good heat source for long smokings.
I now use a lot of Fruit,Maple and Hickory; supported by Oak when I get it,yeah-good wood!

Where are you getting your mesquite from in Ohio? Not from a bag, i hope...

jeffjenkins1
09-11-2009, 08:21 AM
Oak sucks, talk to anybody from Texas. I'll do you a favor and take it off your hands, pm me for my address so you can ship it up. Don't use it, it is not good, give it to me!

Jeff

2Fat
09-11-2009, 09:36 AM
Not to highjack, but does anyone have a good source for oak chunks?
well at least in this part of wisconsin oak is everywhere---pecan on the other hand is sourced on trips south and west

Northwoods Smoke
09-11-2009, 11:12 AM
well at least in this part of wisconsin oak is everywhere---pecan on the other hand is sourced on trips south and west

I should have clarified: chunked, dried, bagged, commercially available and ready to smoke some brisky...

4TheLoveofBrisket
09-11-2009, 11:22 AM
I should have clarified: chunked, dried, bagged, commercially available and ready to smoke some brisky...

Other than those jack daniels chips, I've never seen it commercially available. Looks like there's people on ebay who will sell you some though. Search "oak smoking" and you'll get numerous hits. If you have a maul and a wedge and a chainsaw, why don't you just buy some oak locally and do it yourself and save a heap of money? Just bought a half face cord of oak last night for $35.

Cabntmkr1
09-11-2009, 11:31 AM
I prefer to use white oak. Sometimes when you use red oak you get a funky smell from the minerals in the wood. I think it has a lot to do with where the oak grew. If it was near water, it tends to be a bit funky. Some of the red oak wood has a very fresh and clean smell. This is great for 'quing.
I prefer the white oak for my own 'que.
It smells like bourbon whiskey...actually the bourbon smells like white oak. The bourbon is aged in white oak barrels, and that is where it gets that unique smell and color.
If I use oak, I mix it 50/50 with hickory or mesquite, depending on what I am 'quing.
Steve

2Fat
09-11-2009, 11:33 AM
I should have clarified: chunked, dried, bagged, commercially available and ready to smoke some brisky...
have bought it from the folks that used to vend wood at the Royal--just don't like the idea of paying freight for wood---and if you are ever in Central Wisc can hook ya up with a bunch of oak very reasonable--but now have to finish packing for a trip to Wy/Mt

big brother smoke
09-11-2009, 11:42 AM
I prefer to use white oak. Sometimes when you use red oak you get a funky smell from the minerals in the wood. I think it has a lot to do with where the oak grew. If it was near water, it tends to be a bit funky. Some of the red oak wood has a very fresh and clean smell. This is great for 'quing.
I prefer the white oak for my own 'que.
It smells like bourbon whiskey...actually the bourbon smells like white oak. The bourbon is aged in white oak barrels, and that is where it gets that unique smell and color.
If I use oak, I mix it 50/50 with hickory or mesquite, depending on what I am 'quing.
Steve


Steve,

California coastal oak smells like heaven! PM me if you want to do a trade :biggrin:

mbshop
09-11-2009, 04:44 PM
far as i know, all the calif oak is good. black and valley is what i use. shrub does well also.

The_Kapn
09-11-2009, 04:57 PM
I am not really sure about all the variations of Oak that are out there.

But, in general I have ranked the 3 major "Nut Woods" as Oak, Pecan, and Hickory in order from mildest to stronger.
I can tell the difference between Oak and Hickory on the extremes.
I can not tell the difference beween Oak/Pecan or Pecan/Hickory.

They are all great.

FWIW.

TIM