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jswordy
08-10-2009, 03:00 PM
OK, I am looking at two porterhouses given to me by a friend who had a bull processed. They've been sitting in my freezer. I have been reticent to do these, since he says the meat from this bull is tough. But I am on a mission to use the meat I have frozen before I buy more

I would like to grill them just because it is less time and hassle.

Any ideas about what I could do that would be a non-MSG way of making them tender and tasty? I had thought about blessing them in EVO and spices, grilling, foiling, resting, then warming again on the grill. I dunno if that even would work. I'm open to suggestions.

bbqbull
08-10-2009, 03:05 PM
I would use a tool called a jaccuard on the meat.
Its basically a row of needles that punches little holes in the meat.
A big bbq fork will do the same thing, just much more effort.

Im sure others will hop in here shortly and offer other advice.

landarc
08-10-2009, 03:09 PM
How thick are they? Here is a case where wet or dry aging would help. The other option is to marinate then, the jacquard would also help, doing it with a fork would not be worth it. At that point, I would make it into a meatloaf.

jswordy
08-10-2009, 03:22 PM
Looking at 1" or so thick.

I could wait til the UDS is done, start them on it and then finish on the grill. Lotta trouble, though. Porterhouse is not my fav steak, anyway, so I am just curious about ways to experiment with it. Other ideas?

milehigh
08-10-2009, 03:28 PM
If they were mine, i would screw both of them up at the same time.:biggrin:
So my advice would be, do one up at a time, so the second one would come out perfect

Paul

CraigC
08-10-2009, 03:39 PM
If you don't want to serve them as a whole steak, maybe the cutting method used for skirt or flank (at an angle, across the grain), will make them chew easier. Heck, marinade em, grill em and thin slice em for a steak salad or steak sandwiches. I like to take a cast iron skillet, get it white hot on my propane jet cooker and blacken them for a salad.

Craig

BigAl
08-10-2009, 03:43 PM
OK, I am looking at two porterhouses given to me by a friend who had a bull processed. They've been sitting in my freezer. I have been reticent to do these, since he says the meat from this bull is tough. But I am on a mission to use the meat I have frozen before I buy more

I would like to grill them just because it is less time and hassle.

Any ideas about what I could do that would be a non-MSG way of making them tender and tasty? I had thought about blessing them in EVO and spices, grilling, foiling, resting, then warming again on the grill. I dunno if that even would work. I'm open to suggestions.

Some one here posted an article link which I saved on my PC about making great steak out of a poor steak (I have not tried it yet but plan to the next time I can afford steak), Here is the link:
http://steamykitchen.com/163-how-to-turn-cheap-choice-steaks-into-gucci-prime-steaks.html

And here is a thread here on salting steaks:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63559&highlight=salting+steak

Post your results and PRON :shock:.

GreasePig
08-10-2009, 03:45 PM
I'd marinate them. A few hours will help alot if the meat is tough.

Bulls are notoriously tough when butchered, but a couple of nice 1" think Porterhouse Steaks is probably $30 worth of beef.

Worst case is they don't make great steaks and you have sandwiches on em' for a couple of days...

jswordy
08-10-2009, 03:45 PM
Some one here posted an article link which I saved on my PC about making great steak out of a poor steak (I have not tried it yet but plan to the next time I can afford steak), Here is the link:
http://steamykitchen.com/163-how-to-turn-cheap-choice-steaks-into-gucci-prime-steaks.html

And here is a thread here on salting steaks:
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63559&highlight=salting+steak

Post your results and PRON :shock:.

Three words: high blood pressure. No can do. Thanks anyway.

Wampus
08-10-2009, 04:14 PM
I would use a tool called a jaccuard on the meat.
Its basically a row of needles that punches little holes in the meat.
A big bbq fork will do the same thing, just much more effort.

Im sure others will hop in here shortly and offer other advice.


I've always heard that you should never puncture the meat because it'll make all the juices run out during the cook. ??? My wife's pu regular old "meat tenderizer" on steaks before and it really does make a difference (but I don't know how this works with the whole MSG thing....?)

Othe than that.....like others have said, if you cook them and they're tough, just cut on a bias to shorten the length of the meat fibers and make it less chewy to eat. This has worked well for me when cooking flank or skirt steak (which typically is pretty tough).



Good luck!

Don't like Porterhouse??? Wha?

Grillman
08-10-2009, 04:46 PM
Since you know in advance that the steaks are expected to be tougher
than what you would expect them to be; because they are from a Bull.

I would cut the meat off the bone; and then cut it into strips about
1 1/2 inches wide. (season with your favorite spices)
Then grill them over HIGH heat (to get a good sear on them)
for about 2 or 3 minutes per side (top & bottom) Aim for Medium Rare
and see how it tastes...you can put them back on for longer cooking
if you really need to.
If you still find it too tough to eat....just cut it up in nice size chunks
and put it in the freezer...to be used later for Beef Stew or homemade
Chilie.

Most people consider the "Porterhouse" to be the best steak there is;
followed closely by a "Ribeye"....so if you don't care for a "Porterhouse",
then what cuts of beef do you like best?

BigBarry
08-10-2009, 05:07 PM
I would grill it in very high heat until crusty and rare, wrap in foil with EVOO, smashed garlic, coarse S&P and chopped sage (Tuscan steak pep) and put back on over low heat until tender.

jswordy
08-10-2009, 05:18 PM
I would grill it in very high heat until crusty and rare, wrap in foil with EVOO, smashed garlic, coarse S&P and chopped sage (Tuscan steak pep) and put back on over low heat until tender.

I've been leaning to doing it this way. EVOO/balsamic vinegar could make a tasty base for marinade/sauce.

Learnin Querve
08-11-2009, 02:09 AM
Ever considered deep frying them? Had them done that way when I was in Medora, ND years ago, and our Senator Harkin holds a steak fry every year. It's sometimes called pitchfork fondue.

They stick steaks on the tines of pitchforks and deep fry them in barrels of oil. No breading, just some salt, pepper, and a bit of garlic powder on patted dry, room temperature steaks. Deep fry in 350 degree oil for about 3 minutes for medium. They're surprisingly good.

Chris

BBQ Grail
08-11-2009, 02:12 AM
If they were mine, I'd post pictures so everyone could see them...

big brother smoke
08-11-2009, 07:34 AM
^^^^what he said!