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Ashmont
04-09-2009, 10:05 AM
I saw this at the farm supply last weekend. Its call Topsy Turvey Tomater planter. Me loves my own tomaters on a summer BACON!!!!!! Lettuce tomater sammich! Then I put on my virtual brethren hat and brain cell a firing and I bet I could build one and hang from shepard hooks. Anybody else do this?

This is what it looks like:

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b321/Ashmont_/418WCkmLzVL_AA400_.jpg

This is what I am thinking:



http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b321/Ashmont_/g_indiana.jpg

Divemaster
04-09-2009, 10:09 AM
Saw the same thing on TV for the last couple of weeks... I'll stick with my tomato racks made out of re-mesh... The plants get close to 7' tall and I have more than enough tomatoes for my daughter and I...


BTW.... Tomato Bacon Sammie's are to die for!!!!

HungryHolstrom
04-09-2009, 10:13 AM
I can't grow tomato's for shizzz? I need help.....

jonboy
04-09-2009, 10:19 AM
I use 5 gal buckets hanging also.
We leave the lid off, easy to fertilize and water.
We throw a little mulch on top to help with water retention.
You can plant small herbs in top also.
Keep high off ground and your plants will not rot on ground.
This is a great way to grow and pick cherry and lemon tomatoes.
I am thinking about a diy earthbox for larger tomatoes this year.
jon

chad
04-09-2009, 10:23 AM
Bucket work but really ensure you have good hooks or other support.

I've grown eggplant, cukes, and tomatoes in hanging buckets and a couple of variations of the "topsy-turvy" -- they work but the bugs usually win here in Florida.

swamprb
04-09-2009, 11:20 AM
I've been contemplating it since this link appeared.

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=41526&highlight=growing+tomatoes+upside+down

Bentley
04-09-2009, 11:29 AM
I was wondering if you could put holes in the side and get two plants in every bucket?

BobBrisket
04-09-2009, 11:31 AM
I've thought about them but always wondered if the weight of the plant and maters would yank the whole plant out of the bucket. Seems it wouldn't happen since you all have done them before. Just might try a plant this year and see how it goes. Can't hurt to try.

sfbbqguy
04-09-2009, 12:34 PM
Does anyone have anyinsight on how to get the plant to start growing out of the bottom?

Radical Rick
04-09-2009, 12:45 PM
Does anyone have anyinsight on how to get the plant to start growing out of the bottom?

Drill about a quarter size hole in the bottom.
Place a small amount of the plant through the hole, leaving most of the plant inside the bucket.
Fill with top soil.
cover with mulch.
use very little fertilizer!
helps to turn the bucket on it's side.
may want to have a backup hanger attached to the bucket because the sun is rough on the plastic! :roll:

chambersuac
04-09-2009, 12:49 PM
I know you can grow tomatoes successfully upside down, but have any of you ever tried growing hot peppers that way?
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BobBrisket
04-09-2009, 01:20 PM
I saw a gardening show where the guy used a 2-3 inch circular peice of cardboard on the inside with a slot and hole cut in it to help keep the plant in place and from falling out will the roots got established. The cardboard eventually rots away.

Hachie Qer
04-09-2009, 01:43 PM
I did this last year in a bucket. It grew well and set a few tomatoes but then it was neglected. Hanging on an old clothes line pole too far from the house. Took all of my 100ft hose to get to it. I think it's a great idea. May try again this year. I cut a slice off one of those fun noodle pool toys, fit it over the stem to hold in soil. I figured the soft foam would protect the stem when it gets real windy and yet hold in the soil.

BobBrisket
04-09-2009, 01:52 PM
I did this last year in a bucket. It grew well and set a few tomatoes but then it was neglected. Hanging on an old clothes line pole too far from the house. Took all of my 100ft hose to get to it. I think it's a great idea. May try again this year. I cut a slice off one of those fun noodle pool toys, fit it over the stem to hold in soil. I figured the soft foam would protect the stem when it gets real windy and yet hold in the soil.

Good idea.

Mark
04-09-2009, 02:01 PM
[QUOTE=Ashmont;898059]I saw this at the farm supply last weekend. Its call Topsy Turvey Tomater planter. Me loves my own tomaters on a summer BACON!!!!!! Lettuce tomater sammich! Then I put on my virtual brethren hat and brain cell a firing and I bet I could build one and hang from shepard hooks. Anybody else do this?[QUOTE]

I have a large supply of heavy duty vinyl tent material in many weights and colors and an industrial sewing machine. I made some tubes similar to the "topsy turvey" green thing in yor pic but a little larger. Instead of just growing out the bottom, I cut a few slits in the side and insert plants. A little wet newspaper stuffed in the remaining space in the slit to conserve moisture. I also grow out the top. The bottom is tied shut but allows for drainage. The top is reinforced and grommetted then hung by ropes. At the end of the season, I just untie the bottom and empty the bag. I've had good success with tomatoes and peppers.

The upside down bucket looks a little hokie to me. Besides, there's an inherient problem with the upside-down approach. It's various forms of tomato wilt; which is caused by a combination of water and dirt on the plants. I don't see any way to avoid this situation when youve got the plant coming out the bottom.

EatonHoggBBQ
04-09-2009, 05:28 PM
How high do you have to hang the plant? The plant pictured here is 7 feet tall. By the end of summer it grew to close to 10 feet tall, then collapsed on to itself. When hanging up side down do you have to trim them to keep them short and bushy?

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/2982/dsc05960.jpg

Ashmont
04-09-2009, 05:31 PM
How high do you have to hang the plant? The plant pictured here is 7 feet tall. By the end of summer it grew to close to 10 feet tall, then collapsed on to itself. When hanging up side down do you have to trim them to keep them short and bushy?

http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/2982/dsc05960.jpg

Id say tie it to the gutter. My two story will be a bonus!!!!!:shock:

EatonHoggBBQ
04-09-2009, 05:43 PM
Id say tie it to the gutter. My two story will be a bonus!!!!!:shock:


LOL.....yea that'll work. Stick your head out the window and pick some tomatoes.

TheRancheroGuy
04-09-2009, 07:39 PM
I tried it last year, and the maters in the garden were bigger/better. For whatever reason, the plant didn't get pollinated to well.

Smokin Turkey
04-09-2009, 09:12 PM
Yeah I dont know if this would work with all tomato types. I always get a started plant, burry about 75% of the total plant and it starts off by looking like it will die then it explodes to 8-10' tall (romas) and I had a cherry version go up an 8' fence, down it and back up again! I had enough tomatoes from the one plant to keep me and the neigbors in salads the whole season till the frotn hit. I considered tarping but you just hot a point where you are sick of the little buggers!

garyk1398
04-10-2009, 12:53 AM
My sister did one of those last year and the thing was a joke! She took care of the plants but the thing was spindlely and had really small toe-maders!

Mr. Bo
04-10-2009, 01:01 AM
Here's a link (http://www.oklahomahistory.net/tomatos.html) with several other links about upside down tomatoes. It appears that they can be successfully grown in this manner. There are some ideas for making your own UD planters.
We are trying some of the methods this year since our ground here is poor and hard.

darthtrader
04-10-2009, 05:00 AM
I've tried both the Topsy Turvy and my own bucket. Both dry out too fast, imo. Supporting large beefsteak type tomatoes like a 'Beefmaster' that has 2lbs+++ fruit can get really tricky. We get some serious Santa Ana winds here in the summer and fall, which really presents as danger to my hanging plants. It did work fine with cherry tomatoes and small bush type tomatoes like roma. If you really want to grow juicy tomatoes without any splitting or worry about fertilizing or soil-born pathogens, I'd suggest going with an Earthtainer. http://earthtainer.tomatofest.com/ This is my second year going with this method and my 'maters have never been better! I grow my sweet corn, peppers and eggplant the same way too.

Mark
04-14-2009, 12:30 PM
Here's a low teck version of the earthtainer concept I've been using for several years base on free 5-gallon plastic buckets.

Container Farming: Organic food production in the slums of Mexico City
http://journeytoforever.org/garden_con-mexico.html

And an old post of mine that describes my experiences
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showpost.php?p=92586&postcount=3

And also pics:

EatonHoggBBQ
07-10-2009, 09:42 PM
OK, so did anyone try the upside down tomato plants? Got pics?

Grillman
07-10-2009, 10:10 PM
BTW.... Tomato Bacon Sammie's are to die for!!!!

Don't forget to include Lettuce and cheese; with a little Mayo and mustard.

landarc
07-10-2009, 10:21 PM
The topsy turvy planters work fine for schnitz and giggles. It is not the best way to produce a lot of tomatoes. I am seriously considering scaling up to hundreds of plants next year, and I am planning on using eathboxes or hydro. I have never understood how the water does not hit the foliage, as Mark points out above. I am a fan of dry foliage and very few fungal diseases on my tomatoes. To put this back on topic, I do love smoked tomatoes, especially nice saladette types, slow smoked until the moisture is partially driven off. So sweet and intensely tomato.

peaspurple
07-10-2009, 11:49 PM
I already have a home made one. 2.5 gallon bucket with a 2 inch hole sawed in the bottom. I got tomatoes growing out of the bottom and strawberries growing out of the top. Very easy to make and cheaper...

hondad
07-11-2009, 12:05 AM
I have one and it is doing well. Saw a guy had a rack setup using the buckets - he left the tops open and grew lettuce in the top - pretty slick.

LT72884
07-11-2009, 02:18 AM
I saw this at the farm supply last weekend. Its call Topsy Turvey Tomater planter. Me loves my own tomaters on a summer BACON!!!!!! Lettuce tomater sammich! Then I put on my virtual brethren hat and brain cell a firing and I bet I could build one and hang from shepard hooks. Anybody else do this?

This is what it looks like:

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b321/Ashmont_/418WCkmLzVL_AA400_.jpg



I have a toppsy turvey. Works great. It weighs like 30 pounds because of all the potting soil.

Deanr
07-11-2009, 07:05 AM
I tried them upside down and had problems, first the wind messed up the stem where it went into the bucket, then it didn't pollinate very well. I do much better the old way, into the ground.