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nancee
04-07-2009, 02:04 PM
Does anyone have any suggestions for breathing new life (freshness) into last season's rubs? In this case, it is specifically Head Country. Still tastes good but has gotten very salty.
I have WAY too much to throw away. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.
TIA,
Nancee

Bigdog
04-07-2009, 02:38 PM
This is why I don't like Head Country, too salty in the first place. I would suggest mixing sugar, paprika, garlic, mustard etc till you get it to a tolerable level.

Plowboy
04-07-2009, 02:39 PM
Buy 2x more HC than you have now and mix together. Chitty answer, but whatcha gonna do?

The Pickled Pig
04-07-2009, 02:50 PM
This year I started throwing all of my old rubs and seasonings into a big mystery tub that I use for home cooks. The only thing I moderate mixing in is ground peppers. I was able to shed about 30 partial bottles of stuff from the cupboards. My mystery tub has grown to about a gallon and the mix is fairly stable.

barbefunkoramaque
04-07-2009, 02:57 PM
There is something else that may be happening besides the reduction in taste from the age.

I have this awesome Fry dust I use on my Fried Chicken, you know the one I used for dipping into that sauce of 1 gallon red wine vinegar, 1 gallon Cajun Chef Hot sauce and 1 gallon honey along with my special 2 cups of added rub? Anywho the dust, which is different from anything people normally put on fried chicken because it is only about 1/4 flour, the rest being more like a rub.

Well this stuff, if your not careful about mixing before using, tends to lose its smaller spices much quicker than the salt (this esp hold true if I dip in the rub instead of sprinkle) as the batch gets smaller, the salt ratio level goes up.

Markbb
04-07-2009, 02:58 PM
THis may sound alittle weird but I mix with hazlenut coffee grounds....turns out pretty damn good and don't go to overboard on the coffee

nancee
04-08-2009, 11:46 AM
this seems to be the case here as well. I am going to try mixing in some new spices to some of it and if that does not work, then I will take Todd's suggestion and triple it to thin it out. Thanks guys for the suggestions.
Nancee

There is something else that may be happening besides the reduction in taste from the age.
Well this stuff, if your not careful about mixing before using, tends to lose its smaller spices much quicker than the salt (this esp hold true if I dip in the rub instead of sprinkle) as the batch gets smaller, the salt ratio level goes up.

chad
04-08-2009, 12:46 PM
This year I started throwing all of my old rubs and seasonings into a big mystery tub that I use for home cooks. The only thing I moderate mixing in is ground peppers. I was able to shed about 30 partial bottles of stuff from the cupboards. My mystery tub has grown to about a gallon and the mix is fairly stable.

I've done the dump it all in one bucket gig before - actually turned out pretty good!

Nancee - you might try spreading the rub on a baking sheet and baking the rub at low heat for 20 minutes or so.

nancee
04-08-2009, 02:04 PM
thanks Dave
Nice to hear from you
nancee

sampson
04-08-2009, 04:15 PM
Another thing just to consider is that maybe your tastes have changed and what seemed great last year is too salty for you now. I know that my own homemade rubs now contain far less salt than back when I started making them. Just an idea...