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View Full Version : My CAB Rib Roast adventure started today.


jtfisher63
12-21-2008, 10:17 PM
I decided to dry age the standing rib roast I am cooking for Christmas. I bought it today and started my 4 day dry age process. All I did today was take the roast out of the packaging and wrap in flour sack towels. I wrapped it in two towels today and will change out the towels everyday until Thursday. So, here's the pics of day one.

This is actually Certified Angus Beef. This was the best quality I could find around here without being preseasoned.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229312058/gallery_946_66_107814.jpg

http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229312058/gallery_946_66_95011.jpg

http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229312058/gallery_946_66_147552.jpg

Wrapped then put into the fridge.

More pics tomorrow!

cmcadams
12-21-2008, 10:25 PM
I've got a good recipe for sour cream fresh horseradish sauce if you'd like it, to go with that fine hunk o' beef.

capri man
12-21-2008, 10:30 PM
i have never dry aged any meat. what does it actually do?? be gentle i am a newbie!!:biggrin:

cmcadams
12-21-2008, 10:46 PM
i have never dry aged any meat. what does it actually do?? be gentle i am a newbie!!:biggrin:

You'll likely get better answers than mine, but it basically allows water to evaporate out of the meat (along with allowing some deterioration of muscle fiber), resulting in concentrated beef flavor and more tender beef.

gpalasz
12-21-2008, 11:01 PM
Nice looking beef. What are you going to cook it on? Whats the plan of attack on that roast?:-P

jtfisher63
12-21-2008, 11:09 PM
I've got a good recipe for sour cream fresh horseradish sauce if you'd like it, to go with that fine hunk o' beef.

Absolutley I'd like it!

i have never dry aged any meat. what does it actually do?? be gentle i am a newbie!!:biggrin:

I'm new to dry aging also. From what I have heard it's what cmcadams said below.

You'll likely get better answers than mine, but it basically allows water to evaporate out of the meat (along with allowing some deterioration of muscle fiber), resulting in concentrated beef flavor and more tender beef.

This is basically the same as I have heard.

Nice looking beef. What are you going to cook it on? Whats the plan of attack on that roast?:-P

Ok, I've done my research and I think I've come up with a recipe that I'm going to use. (I wrote this up a couple weeks ago and just today decided to add the dry aging) I haven't done this yet so don't blame me if you use it and something isn't right! http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/style_emoticons/default/tongue.png The amounts of herbs and garlic may be changed as I am making the paste. I may also change the herbs from tablespoon measurements to leaves, sprigs etc. I don't really know how to measure herbs by tablespoons very well. If you see any obvious probs with this recipe please chime in and let me know.

Prime Rib

5 Bone Rib Roast (About 12.5 Pounds) Approx. 10 servings

Rub Mixture:

8 - 10 fresh garlic cloves, smashed
2 Tablespoons fresh basil, finely chopped
2 Tablespoons fresh oregano, finely chopped
2 Tablespoons fresh thyme, finely chopped
2 Tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
3 Tablespoons Kosher Salt
3 Tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
2-3 Tablespoons olive oil

Mix all ingredients to make a paste.

Use a knive to cut in between the bones and roast until the bones are almost all the way off. (My butcher did this for me.)

Rub the paste over all surfaces of the meat, including on the ends of the roast and in between the bones and meat. Tie the bones back onto the roast using butchers twine.

Let the roast sit at room temperature for two hours before cooking.

Prepare Egg for indirect cooking with the platesetter. Put a drip pan under the rack on top of the platesetter to catch drippings. Bring the Egg up to 500*.

Sear the rib roast until a nice crust has formed. Take the rib roast off and an insert remote thermometer probe into thickest part of the meat then loosely cover with foil.

Close Egg down to drop temp to 300*. This should take about 15 - 20 minutes.

Once the Egg is at 300* put rib roast back on bones side down and plug in thermometer probe into thermometer. Also add wood chips to the coal at this time. A little hickory or oak mixed with a fruit wood works well. It doesn't need much smoke at all.

Roast until internal temp reaches 120* for medium rare. Pull rib roast off of Egg and rest under loose foil for 15 - 30 minutes. During resting the temp will rise to about 130* - 135*. Remove rib bones then slice roast to desired thickness. Enjoy.

For those that want overcooked beef, their slice can be put back on to Egg and overcooked to desired temperature.

cmcadams
12-21-2008, 11:17 PM
I like to cook prime rib a bit lower, to ensure even doneness across the slices.

The sour cream horseradish sauce is simple:

2 cups sour cream
1 tablespoon (or more, to your liking) fresh grated horseradish (prepared can be used, too)
1 tablespoon chopped chives
1 tablespoon champagne vinegar.

Mix it all together and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

jtfisher63
12-22-2008, 12:19 AM
I like to cook prime rib a bit lower, to ensure even doneness across the slices.

The sour cream horseradish sauce is simple:

2 cups sour cream
1 tablespoon (or more, to your liking) fresh grated horseradish (prepared can be used, too)
1 tablespoon chopped chives
1 tablespoon champagne vinegar.

Mix it all together and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

When you say even doneness across the slices, do you mean from the middle of the steak to the outside edge or even from the middle cut to the end cuts? I do want the steaks to be close to medium rare as far out to the edge as possible. I wouldn't complain though if the outer(end) cuts were closer to medium though. There's always a couple of people that prefer medium.

Barbarian
12-22-2008, 12:53 AM
Good lookin' start JT.
This is my first prime rib and first attempt to dry age.
Will be waiting to see the pron on Thursday!!!!!!!

cmcadams
12-22-2008, 06:36 AM
When you say even doneness across the slices, do you mean from the middle of the steak to the outside edge or even from the middle cut to the end cuts? I do want the steaks to be close to medium rare as far out to the edge as possible. I wouldn't complain though if the outer(end) cuts were closer to medium though. There's always a couple of people that prefer medium.

I'm talking middle of the steak to the edge. The edge itself is going to be a bit more done, but as much of the slice as I can get to be the same, the better, and that's best done at lower temps.

The outer ends are also likely to get a bit more done, just because the edge is there.

gpalasz
12-22-2008, 08:44 AM
Jamie Purviance on Weber nation ( on the weber site) does a prime rib on the kettle,. its a great video. Worth checking out.

gotwood
12-22-2008, 09:11 AM
When you dry age the meat like this, do you end up having to trim off the outer layer of meat like the restaurants do after 2 or 3 weeks??

I hope not.

Ron_L
12-22-2008, 10:38 AM
The recipe sounds great, Jason! I usually do either Montreal Steak Seasoning or EVOO, garlic and rosemary, but the addition of the other herbs sound great.

I also cook my prime rib at a lower temp. Besides the more even doneness that Curt mentioned, I feel that the slower cook gives it a better flavor. In the Egg I have been cooking at 270 dome temp and I still get a nice color on the outside.

Here's one that I cooked earlier in the year...

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d172/Ron_L/Big%20Green%20Egg/IMG_4494A.jpg

Now, having said that, the absolutely best prime rib that I have cooked was in my Cookshack Smokette or my FEC. Stuart, the president of Cookshack, posted his prime rib method on the Cookshack forum (http://forum.cookshack.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/3621020264/m/3971034983) a while back and it is killer. He seasons it with EVOO, garlic and rosemary and then cooks it at 250 until it is 115-120 internal, and then holds it at 140 cooker temp for several hours. I talked to him about this at the FEC class a couple of weeks ago and he has held it for as long as 8 hours. The extended hold time alows the juices to circulate and the flavor is infused throughout the roast. He also posted a revised method that calls for a sear in a 600 degree convection oven first, but I haven't tried that yet.

jtfisher63
12-23-2008, 08:42 PM
Update! I know, I'm a day late.
Day 2
This is what it looked like still wrapped.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_30995.jpg

Looks like I will have to do some trimming before cooking.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_2966.jpg
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_19506.jpg

jtfisher63
12-23-2008, 08:43 PM
Update!
Day 3

Getting nasty looking!
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_28435.jpg

Notice the bones are more exposed on day 3.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_27064.jpg

More to come.

yelonutz
12-23-2008, 08:55 PM
Jason, the towel is starting to look like the "Shroud of Turin"!
www.shroud.com
NUTZ

Trucky1008
12-23-2008, 11:39 PM
Now, having said that, the absolutely best prime rib that I have cooked was in my Cookshack Smokette or my FEC. Stuart, the president of Cookshack, posted his prime rib method on the Cookshack forum (http://forum.cookshack.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/3621020264/m/3971034983) a while back and it is killer. He seasons it with EVOO, garlic and rosemary and then cooks it at 250 until it is 115-120 internal, and then holds it at 140 cooker temp for several hours. I talked to him about this at the FEC class a couple of weeks ago and he has held it for as long as 8 hours. The extended hold time alows the juices to circulate and the flavor is infused throughout the roast. He also posted a revised method that calls for a sear in a 600 degree convection oven first, but I haven't tried that yet.

This is the same method I use when I cook prime rib in my electric cookshack. I usually go about 5 hours and they always turn out amazing!

toys4dlr
12-24-2008, 11:25 AM
I did a modified version in the stumps cooking slow at 250, then in to the cambro for a couple hours (Needed a nap mod). It was amazing.

I was not planning on doing it that way, so I hope I can duplicate it this year.

jtfisher63
12-25-2008, 12:22 AM
Update!

Day 4

It's looking about the same, maybe a little funkier.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_26%38%309.jpg
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_108663.jpg
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_133535.jpg

Tomorrows the day!

jtfisher63
12-25-2008, 03:05 PM
Update!

Day 5

Here we go! Here's the final pic of the funk.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_31750.jpg

I trimmed off all the funk. By the way, it didn't smell funky, just looked funky.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_25875.jpg

Here it is all trimmed up, nice and bright white again.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_59519.jpg

Here's what I unded up using for flavor. Olive oil, freshly ground black pepper, Kosher salt, A full head of garlic, rosemary, oregano, sage and thyme. I pressed the garlic and minced the herbs.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_10026.jpg
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_70051.jpg

Here's how the butcher cut the bones almost all the way off. Awesome way to add more flavor!
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_95160.jpg

Here it is all put back together and rubbed with the goodness.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_159007.jpg

I used Royal Oak lump with just a few JD oak chips mixed in for smoke.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_48173.jpg

Here it is going onto the Egg at 11:00. I didn't let it sit in room temp as long as I'd like and the probe measured internal temp at 39* when it went on.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_104621.jpg

The Egg is set just under 300* dome temp right now. The internal temp is to 49* as of 11:52.

I almost forgot, I decided to use more of Alton Brown's technique and do a reverse sear on the roast. I am going to cook it on the Egg until the internal hits 115* then pull it off and rest in foil. We will then head to my parents house (2 miles away) and finish roasting it in their oven at 500* until the internal is 125* and a nice crust has formed. I also decided that I will cut the bones off before the final 500* roast. I haven't seen this done before, I figured this way I can get a better crust all the way around the roast. Then it will come back out and rest for 15-25 minutes before carving.

More to come later.

jestridge
12-25-2008, 08:13 PM
WoW you really did some work it realyy looks wonderful but 86 bucks for a roast is a little above my budget
. I prolly could afford it but I'm kida frugal

NotleyQue
12-25-2008, 09:33 PM
Nice looking hunk of meat Jason.
Wish I was there to taste some of it.

Ron_L
12-25-2008, 11:44 PM
Jason? Are you in a beef induced coma? Where are the finished pictures?

jtfisher63
12-26-2008, 12:53 AM
Finale!

I ended up finishing it up on the Egg after all. It took three hours for it to go from 39* internal to 115* internal.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1230269998/gallery_946_119_49631.jpg

I then pulled it off and opened up the Egg to get it to 500*.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_58246.jpg

I cut the bones off and returned the roast to the now 500* degree Egg. I let it develop a crust while the internal rose to 124*. That only took about 12 minutes. I then pulled it off and loosely foiled it and ran over to my parents house. Here it is after a nice 20 minute rest.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_109240.jpg

It sliced up real nice.
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_9147.jpg
http://www.cbbqa.org/forum/uploads/1229913973/gallery_946_119_34221.jpg

Overall it came out great. It tasted good and was very beefy and tender. The oak wasn't overpowering and neither were the herbs. My only complaint was that it wasn't very uniform in doneness from the center out and also from left to right. There were only about 3 inches in the middle that were really what I consider medium-rare. I cooked it at 300* until it hit 115*. Then 500* to 124*. I would have cooked it closer to 275*, but it took longer to prep than I had planned. I think next time I will cook it closer to 225* and take my time. Either way, I believe it was worth the trouble and I will do it again!

BBQ Grail
12-26-2008, 12:58 AM
Fantastic job Jason! That is one fine piece of beef artwork there.

Norcoredneck
12-26-2008, 01:36 AM
Fine looking hunk of Beef Brother.


I've got a good recipe for sour cream fresh horseradish sauce if you'd like it, to go with that fine hunk o' beef.

How about posting it? I love the stuff.

BBQ Grail
12-26-2008, 01:38 AM
How about posting it? I love the stuff.

This thread...
Post #7

Norcoredneck
12-26-2008, 01:52 AM
Thanks Larry. Does anyone remember the thread Country HB posted where his buddy speared a green onion and fresh rosemary in the axis of the roast before cooking it? Wondering if it would add to the enjoyment.
http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j67/bigmista/Country%20Birthday/052408011.jpg

garyk1398
12-26-2008, 01:56 AM
Nice job with the before, during and after. Looks outstanding!!!!