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Brian in So Cal
09-06-2008, 10:14 PM
Want to do some beer can chicken on the WSM tomorrow. Need some help.

Anybody done this before? Need to know what temp. Do I remove water pan and do directly over coals? About how long?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

BFoster
09-06-2008, 10:20 PM
As far as I've ever done on the WSM, load it up as usual and set 'em up. 3.5 to 4 hours tops. 225 degrees and it'll be wicked. Don't worry to much if if the heat gets a bit high towards the end.

I've never tried over direct coals, and couldn't advise it.

NotleyQue
09-06-2008, 10:20 PM
call me. ill tell you.


Want to do some beer can chicken on the WSM tomorrow. Need some help.

Anybody done this before? Need to know what temp. Do I remove water pan and do directly over coals? About how long?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks.

BBQ Grail
09-06-2008, 10:23 PM
Here's my suggestion:

Step 1: Open box
Step 2: Remove WSM part from box
Step 3: Assemble WSM...
Step 4: Season WSM (oops here we go again.)

BFoster
09-06-2008, 10:27 PM
Here's my suggestion:

Step 1: Open box
Step 2: Remove WSM part from box
Step 3: Assemble WSM...
Step 4: Season WSM (oops here we go again.)


lol, that's about right. Easy Peasy. ('cept for that seasoning part, slacka!)


In truth about the beer can chicken though...smoke it over the water pan (filled with water, sand, lava rocks...whatever you like) for about 3-4 hours...and it'll turn out great. Keep the temp from 200-230. Munch!


-Brian

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
09-06-2008, 10:29 PM
What would be the advantage to having the chicken on a beer can in a WSM with water in the pan?

BFoster
09-06-2008, 10:32 PM
What would be the advantage to having the chicken on a beer can in a WSM with water in the pan?


I've never seen the advantage other than a slight...very slight flavor it gives to the chicken. Personally...I'd only do it over an offset grill ... and then I'd use something with at least a bit of kick like Dr. Pepper or Coke. I've never had a problem with dry chicken out of the Weber as long as it's slow and mellow.

BFoster
09-06-2008, 10:38 PM
What would be the advantage to having the chicken on a beer can in a WSM with water in the pan?


Also, the water in the water pan of the WSM is more of a heat sink than anything. It just keeps the heat stable. I've run the ones I've had for years with just sand. The gallon of water (or so) that it holds just keeps heat stable......and helps keep a constant temperature. The indirect heat keeps the moisture in.


As always....MHO.


-Brian

HeSmellsLikeSmoke
09-06-2008, 10:42 PM
Since the water evaporates and has to be replenished now and then, I am of the opinion that it creates a moist environment in the smoker in addition to being a heat sink, but then what do I know? :mrgreen:

Brian in So Cal
09-06-2008, 10:43 PM
Here's my suggestion:

Step 1: Open box
Step 2: Remove WSM part from box
Step 3: Assemble WSM...
Step 4: Season WSM (oops here we go again.)


I am having trouble opening the box. :shock::mrgreen:

BFoster
09-06-2008, 10:47 PM
Since the water evaporates and has to be replenished now and then, I am of the opinion that it creates a moist environment in the smoker in addition to being a heat sink, but then what do I know? :mrgreen:


Oh, I agree except that if it's evaporated....would it turn to liquid on a hot surface? It just left one! It's more of a mass that keeps heat stable. There is more than enough moistness in any meat you smoke/cook to make up for it. I messed for years with my smokers...and settled on sand in the bottom. It keeps a nice radiant heat...and doesn't catch fire. ;-) In my Spicewine, I keep water inside...only because it makes it easier to clean and I don't have insurance on it yet. ;-)

HoosierTrooper
09-07-2008, 09:58 AM
I suspected several years ago that the beer can chicken concept was a gimmick and after reading Dr. BBQ's book Big Time Barbeque Cookbook my suspicions were confirmed on page 140. I've used the beer can holder empty just to allow smoke and heat to enter the birds cavity on my WSM. One thing to watch for is the top of the chicken, closest to the lid, will cook hotter than the lower leg/thigh area.

Low and slow will result in chewy, rubbery skin and it's easy to oversmoke chicken. I've had the best luck spatchcocking the chicken, removing the water pan and cooking it around 325-350 with a small amount of apple or cherry.

Jeremiah
09-07-2008, 10:23 AM
I find my WSMs to be great for beer can kitchen. I suggest going waterless, looking for around 300 at the lid. This gives you a nice balance which will both get the skin crispy and go slow enough to render out a lot the skin fat. I like a salty-spicy rub on mine. Make sure to get some under the skin, in the cavity, and in the can.

swamprb
09-07-2008, 02:59 PM
I do them at @250* dome temp and use the Chik-Can holders, I like getting smoke in the cavities.
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/Ugly%20Drum%20Smoker/Weber/100_2239.jpg

They do the "Happy dance"!
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/Ugly%20Drum%20Smoker/Weber/100_2237.jpg

HoosierTrooper
09-07-2008, 03:16 PM
I do them at @250* dome temp and use the Chik-Can holders, I like getting smoke in the cavities.
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/Ugly%20Drum%20Smoker/Weber/100_2239.jpg

They do the "Happy dance"!
http://i163.photobucket.com/albums/t310/swamprb/Ugly%20Drum%20Smoker/Weber/100_2237.jpg
That's how I do em. In my CG I lay them flat with the chickens rear end aimed at the fire box for a nice smoke enema.