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buckinbbq
04-06-2008, 09:13 AM
Good Sunday morning to all. I am new to the site and have competed in a few competitions. I am in awe at folks who can come up with their own rubs and sauces. My question is this. How in the world do you come up with the rubs and sauces? I am not sure even where to start. Or is it just as good to use bought rubs and what not? Any advice would be appreciated.

Jeremiah
04-06-2008, 09:25 AM
Experimentation! Find out what you like/dislike.

Start simple, start with just salt and pepper. See what you like and dislike about it. Next time add some cayenne and/or garlic. The less you modify it each time the better, this will help you scope in on the effects of your changes. Look at the ingredients of commercial rubs that you like, try and isolate the flavors you are enjoying. Add them to your rub.

Just play around and have fun, before you know it you'll have your "go to" all purpose rub, your brisket rub, your rib rub, your chicken rub, etc.

we'll smoke u
04-06-2008, 10:51 AM
I just start putting different things together in small batches and sample it. I made a lot of things that I didn't like and vice verse. Small batches work best so you don't waste product. One thing you want to do when making rubs and sauces is take very good notes so you know what you did and what Quantities.
I have thrown things together and not taken notes and never been able to do the same rub. I have bought a lot of different spices and I taste and smell them to see what I think they would go good with. It's a lot of trial and error but I find it satisfying to make my own. Also there are a lot of store bought rubs and sauces that are real good to.
We have alot of members that make and sell there own stuff I use there stuff all the time.

BBQ Grail
04-06-2008, 11:00 AM
Experimentation! Find out what you like/dislike.

Start simple, start with just salt and pepper. See what you like and dislike about it. Next time add some cayenne and/or garlic. The less you modify it each time the better, this will help you scope in on the effects of your changes. Look at the ingredients of commercial rubs that you like, try and isolate the flavors you are enjoying. Add them to your rub.

Just play around and have fun, before you know it you'll have your "go to" all purpose rub, your brisket rub, your rib rub, your chicken rub, etc.

Excellent advice.

The first thing I found important is to know what different spices/herbs taste like, both when they are cooked and uncooked.

I took several rub recipes from Dr BBQ and Mike Mills and made them up. I then took the recipes and made small batches, leaving out a one ingredient in each batch.

I then cut brisket flat in small strips and rubbed the strips down with different rubs. After smoking them I was able to taste the differences with each batch. The meat is a little tough, but it still has the flavor.

This taught (is teaching) me what the different flavor profiles are.

It might be seem a little over the taught but it's actually quite fun. And if you don't know what things taste like, it helps.

I'm in the process now of developing a rub from the flavors I like and I'm hoping it works out down the road. It's a long process for sure.

I don't know how long it took Spice and Plowboy, as an example, to develop some of their stuff but if it's got to be worth it.

txschutte
04-06-2008, 11:02 AM
Get basic like scott says. Salt, pepper, raw sugar, a few spices like chili pepper, and garlic,. My 10 yo makes his own recipe for brisket. Thats how simple it can be.

parrothead
04-06-2008, 11:21 AM
Don't be afraid, just go for it. If it comes out bland or a little off, chop up whatever you cooked and toss it in a batch of chili.

backyardchef
04-06-2008, 02:49 PM
Excellent advice.

The first thing I found important is to know what different spices/herbs taste like, both when they are cooked and uncooked.

I took several rub recipes from Dr BBQ and Mike Mills and made them up. I then took the recipes and made small batches, leaving out a one ingredient in each batch.

I then cut brisket flat in small strips and rubbed the strips down with different rubs. After smoking them I was able to taste the differences with each batch. The meat is a little tough, but it still has the flavor.

This taught (is teaching) me what the different flavor profiles are.

It might be seem a little over the taught but it's actually quite fun. And if you don't know what things taste like, it helps.

I'm in the process now of developing a rub from the flavors I like and I'm hoping it works out down the road. It's a long process for sure.

I don't know how long it took Spice and Plowboy, as an example, to develop some of their stuff but if it's got to be worth it.

Good advice, Larry....I also think, like Jeremiah mentioned, that looking at recipes of products that you already like and trying to build off the ingredients is a good way to give yourself a sense of direction. Then you can start to tweak things to your satisfaction....taking notes along the way so you know what worked and what didn't, and how to replicate the ones that work....Same things with recipes from books by known 'winners' like Dr. BBQ, Mike Mills and Paul Kirk....etc...

Make small adjustments each time-- if you change too much, you may not be able to tell which adjustment really made the difference......most importantly, have fun! :icon_clown

Plowboy
04-06-2008, 02:55 PM
One thing I learned from Bill (PayDaBill) is to taste each ingredient on its own so you know how to taste for it in your rub.

K I N G P I N
04-06-2008, 03:30 PM
I usually start with a written recipe. Then I add or take away what I like or dislike. My main dry rub, is 5 years in the making. It always evolves as I make it.

White Dog BBQ
04-06-2008, 06:03 PM
I started by getting a couple different recipe books (Steve Raichlen's Sauces, Rubs and Marinades is great for this) and trying the different recipes, and just experiment from there.

Also, remember, there are no bonus points for using your own recipes -- it's not like the judges can tell. They just want it to taste good. :-)

Erik

buckinbbq
04-07-2008, 05:13 PM
Man I appreciate this information. This is great advise. Thanks

rookiedad
04-07-2008, 09:42 PM
Paul Kirk's Championship Barbeque book is very good for learning about building sauces and rubs. i compare it to learning the theory behind the final product.

allboy
04-07-2008, 10:02 PM
I started by getting a couple different recipe books (Steve Raichlen's Sauces, Rubs and Marinades is great for this) and trying the different recipes, and just experiment from there.

Also, remember, there are no bonus points for using your own recipes -- it's not like the judges can tell. They just want it to taste good. :-)

Erik

Steve Raichlen's Sauces, Rubs and Marinades is a great book. This will get you pointed in the right direction.

spicewine
04-08-2008, 08:56 AM
I can tell you that alot of rub hit the trash before I found the right blend that would work with my sauce. Just keep plugging away at it and by all means write everything down.

gotwood
04-08-2008, 09:29 AM
When you get a very basic rub down.....divide it up before a cook and try to add different indredients or different quantities of them....now you have a side/side comparison

blues brother
04-08-2008, 12:49 PM
The best thing to do is get me to give you a little of my rubs! HAA hAA haaa
Seriously, This is a great site for info. These guys are always glad to help help out a fellow Qer.

billm
04-08-2008, 12:54 PM
I can tell you that alot of rub hit the trash before I found the right blend that would work with my sauce. .

just picked up a bottle of your sauce awhile back from gregs store..from one sauce maker to another I have to say good stuff!