PDA

View Full Version : *Cooking Class Help Needed*


txschutte
04-05-2008, 11:23 PM
I was contacted this morning froma business owner in a town about an hour away from me.
Seems he is about 4 1/2 mos into owning a kitchen supply store, and would like somebody with real BBQ experience to teach an in-store BBQ class. He wants to people to sign up to reserve a spot, and see real low and slow from start to finish.

He got my name from a dude I catered for last October with the Hawaiian Theme, and was said he wanted no other.:shock:
Problem is, I've never taught anybody in a class type atmosphere how to Q.
Also, like catering, what other liabilities do I need to look out for?

This may be more than I can pull off by myself, should I try to get a Brother with experience in this to help out?
Whaddaya think???

bbqbull
04-05-2008, 11:26 PM
Me thinks you and your son could do a huge justice for this gentleman.
You both are good to go!
Good luck.

txschutte
04-05-2008, 11:28 PM
What do I charge for the service? Do I need waivers signed be attendees?

bbqbull
04-05-2008, 11:36 PM
What do I charge for the service? Do I need waivers signed be attendees?


I have no idea as to charges for this class.

Ya might make huge brownie points for catering gigs for teaching.
But you have to cover your time, expenses ect.

Im sure someone else who does this type of thing will chime in shortly and give you some ideas.

Good luck!

JD McGee
04-05-2008, 11:43 PM
I'm paying 195.00 for a Paul Kirk class next weekend...does that help?:biggrin:

bbqbull
04-05-2008, 11:53 PM
I'm paying 195.00 for a Paul Kirk class next weekend...does that help?:biggrin:


I always figure my time was worth $15.00 bucks an hour if I was teaching.
When I was teaching at the local community college I made more.

I also learned if you charge a really high dollar amount per hour.........your for real, thus they will listen to you as your for real.

Holy chit, I paid more to attend P. Kirks class 4 yrs ago.
Tell him Mike Mather from Michigan said hello.:biggrin:

txschutte
04-05-2008, 11:55 PM
I'm paying 195.00 for a Paul Kirk class next weekend...does that help?:biggrin:
Problem I have with a hefty tag like that is this.
You are a BBQ guy already, and know the basics of lw and slow. You are mst likely going to a Comp class?
I think the target audience will be the guys that have a gas grille, or a simple 22 1/2" Weber grille. Guys that will probably never compete, and just want to broaden their experience from grilling to Real BBQ.

I may have to implement the basic kettle indirect methods, and introduce them to a more advanced smoker.
I know I will have to cover a few points about different types of smokers, fuels, etc. My plan for that is to collect a few brochures from Spice, Lang, Fast Eddy, Traeger, and the others.

One thing I am battling is do I keep an institutional cooking environment? Or, do I keep it laid back for a "backyard" experience?

There are so many variables here, that my head is spinning.

bbqbull
04-06-2008, 12:00 AM
Backyard is my thought here.........thats how this forum started.

If ya decide to move on and attend the American Royal thats ok also.

KISS is my motto in life.

smooookin
04-06-2008, 12:06 AM
The classes at Backyard Bash in KC are around 75.00 if I remember right. They supply the meat and show ya how to cook it.

The question I would think is what are you planning to do? Are you going to supply meat, rub, fuel etc.? how many people do you expect?

I would make it a casual, fun class and hope for good reviews and repeat performances.

txschutte
04-06-2008, 12:12 AM
The classes at Backyard Bash in KC are around 75.00 if I remember right. They supply the meat and show ya how to cook it.

The question I would think is what are you planning to do? Are you going to supply meat, rub, fuel etc.? how many people do you expect?

I would make it a casual, fun class and hope for good reviews and repeat performances.
I plan to do all 4 major meats and a couple of sides. I plan to pay for all meats, rubs, fuel etc.
The biz owner was hoping for a class of 25 max. Plan another date if there is a demand.
I'm expecting the biz owner wanting a cut, and plan on letting him handle registration, ads and the such. Coming up with a bottom dollar per head price + expenses is what I'm looking at.

Bossmanbbq
04-06-2008, 12:17 AM
PM sent...

kickassbbq
04-06-2008, 09:43 AM
TxSchutte Man,
I do them every month.
It's easy if you have ANY Public Speaking skills or at least are not afraid of speaking in front of people.
You know the Basics??? That's all MOST people are really wanting. Not as many people out there interested in Competition as there are just plain Teach Me How To Smoke Something!!!!

http://www.kickassbbq.com/bbq_classes.htm
PARTY!!!!!!!!!!!

parrothead
04-06-2008, 10:30 AM
If doing all 4, then have lots of stuff to fill the time gaps. We have been wanting to do something like that since we started and every time I think about it, I figure just chicken and ribs to keep the time down on the class.

Start right out with prep and getting stuff going, then take all the time in the world to explain what just happened, how it all works, types of pits, yada, yada, yada.

txschutte
04-06-2008, 11:49 AM
I have aplan on what the class "curriculum" should be. I kinda have an idea what to charge.

Are there any liability issues that I should worry about? I already carry insurance, have the ability to get approval from HD. ( althugh it isn't necessary. I'm providing a service, not a product) Can you think of more?

The Pigman
04-06-2008, 11:52 AM
Word of mouth got you there and almost everyone attending probually will not get passed backyard so this opens large area for jobs in the future. The person operating the classes have different ones each time and may have set prices.

My cousins -sons -wife is opening one up in june and hopefully we are doing one there set up in parking lot. She will pay for everything and I reap the rewards.
Which from cooking whole pigs all my life word of mouth will get you more work than you can handle if you do this on the side.

drbbq
04-06-2008, 12:01 PM
I've done a lot of these and you have to keep it basic and fast moving. If you're in Nebraska I think I'd do a ribs and chicken class first and then an advanced smoking class to follow with butts and briskets. I start my rib cooking class with the ribs half done. I start at the cooker, take them off and wrap and return to the cooker. Now I've got an hour to talk about the ribs from the raw stage and rubs etc. When the ribs are done I take the guests back to the cooker and we take them off. If you want to finish them on the grill, that's fine.
The people aren't going to want to stay there for 6-7 hours and you're not going to be able to keep them interested for that long with the exception of the hardcore guys. Most people are there for a little entertainment and the easy way to cook great ribs. You could work some chicken in there as well but there really isn't much to say about chicken so don't leave much time for that. Have a few good stories for the dead time and be sure to use ONLY accessories that are available in the store. Make sure to take a break now and then to give them a chance to shop. It's a business venture after all.

As for pricing, well you have to get what the market will bear. At a store like that I'd guess $50-60 a head is the high end and he'll need to keep some of that for expenses. Cooking classes at stores are fun but it's not a big payday.

JD McGee
04-06-2008, 12:10 PM
Problem I have with a hefty tag like that is this.
You are a BBQ guy already, and know the basics of lw and slow. You are most likely going to a Comp class?
I think the target audience will be the guys that have a gas grille, or a simple 22 1/2" Weber grille. Guys that will probably never compete, and just want to broaden their experience from grilling to Real BBQ.

I may have to implement the basic kettle indirect methods, and introduce them to a more advanced smoker.
I know I will have to cover a few points about different types of smokers, fuels, etc. My plan for that is to collect a few brochures from Spice, Lang, Fast Eddy, Traeger, and the others.

One thing I am battling is do I keep an institutional cooking environment? Or, do I keep it laid back for a "backyard" experience?

There are so many variables here, that my head is spinning.

I'd keep it "back yard" unless you get specific questions about comp cooking.

I've been doing a bit of smoking here and there...but it's time to get serious. I've admired Paul Kirk for a while and his technique. 195.00 is a small price to pay to be able to pick the brain of a pit master from sun up to sun down!...:biggrin: Plus...I need a little help with my briskets...:icon_blush:

Sledneck
04-06-2008, 12:13 PM
Being that it is a store i would not rely on a per head basis. I would give the store owner a set fee that you get paid for the event. What if you d0 it his way and 2 guys sign up, is it worth your time? I would think he should be responsible to find attendees and collect the money or even just do random demos during the day at set times for free for the public. Either way it guarantees you get paid

Sledneck
04-06-2008, 12:14 PM
It is advertising for him and a way to draw in new customers

txschutte
04-06-2008, 12:27 PM
Thanks for all the great info. Just to make it clear, I'm not doing this to make a bunch of yen. I figure if I do it, it'll get me a few more toys for comps, and maybe more side work.

BBQ Grail
04-06-2008, 12:28 PM
At least twice will you mention that "boiling" ribs ISN'T BBQ?

txschutte
04-06-2008, 12:29 PM
At least twice will you mention that "boiling" ribs ISN'T BBQ?
It's not???:confused::biggrin:

BBQ Grail
04-06-2008, 12:31 PM
At least twice will you mention that "boiling" ribs ISN'T BBQ?

It's not???:confused::biggrin:

No it's not. Ask Wyatt!

And please inform your class that just because you put Kraft BBQ Sauce on it, it doesn't make it BBQ.

wnkt
04-06-2008, 07:12 PM
I'd ask the people at the class what they want to get out of it....what they are wanting to learn most. Maybe you can squeeze it in for them...or have plans for the NEXT class.

txschutte
04-06-2008, 07:15 PM
I'd ask the people at the class what they want to get out of it....what they are wanting to learn most. Maybe you can squeeze it in for them...or have plans for the NEXT class.
THAT is a grand idea. I planned on giving out comment cards and asking for suggestions. Maybe I can record the highlights of the first class and post them for you guys to review.

jestridge
04-06-2008, 07:26 PM
For me personally I would teach a class like this one for free or barter with the owner for some deals on supplies. I would have the owner to supply all the food. I been thinking about putting on one at our local county extension office. But if you going to charge 35.00 an hour would be a fair rate. I would also outline what I was going to teach and have at least 6 objective that I want the students to learn. Maybe some handouts. If you good on power point make one up to introduce what you going to teach.

txschutte
04-06-2008, 09:47 PM
For me personally I would teach a class like this one for free or barter with the owner for some deals on supplies. I would have the owner to supply all the food. I been thinking about putting on one at our local county extension office. But if you going to charge 35.00 an hour would be a fair rate. I would also outline what I was going to teach and have at least 6 objective that I want the students to learn. Maybe some handouts. If you good on power point make one up to introduce what you going to teach.
Barter no good for me. I f he had Spicewines or Eggs, maybe. The only thing in his store I would kill to have and don't have already are the complete set of Wustof knives. I learned early in catering not to sell myself short on BBQ related stuff. They want cheap classes? I'll order McRibs and pass them out.
I'm not out to make a killing, but if I teach a bunch of people to make great Q, they're gonna enjoy cooking at home and are gonna pay a fair price for the lesson. They won't be going out to the BBQ joints to pay $20/plate meals when they can feed the family for $30. They'll save money in the long run. That's kinda my take on it.:cool:

STX Cue
04-08-2008, 10:09 AM
I am new here, so certainly take my BBQ advice with a grain of salt. I do, however, have quite a bit of experience teaching and marketing. I think you need to ask the business owner what he wants out of the class and build from there. It is, after all, a marketing gig for his business. He is wanting to draw customers in and make sales from the event, so get his input on what he wants covered in the class. He may have no idea, and then you are back at square one, but give him the chance to offer the input.

You might consider a series of classes, beginning with the very basics and progressing from there. Those who really enjoyed the first class will come back for a second, and even a third. I know time can be a challenge for most of us, but if you are catering, what a great way to get your name out in the community.

I think I would make a small notebook with recipes, cooking temperatures, and room for notes for the attendees. I would also make sure that I had an "About the Instructor" page that tells about you and your business, along with contact numbers. The notebook can be put together for a couple of bucks.

Just my .02.

Bigdog
04-08-2008, 10:57 AM
You ask very good questions tx. My advice to you, as a teacher, is to keep it short and simple. Let the questions from the class guide you as to where to go.

I would also agree with the KISS formula. Don't try to teach everything you know. I would keep the class length shorter too. You can accomplish this by starting the cook long before the class. I would not try to go longer than about 2 hrs. Think Food Network. Show them the prep work and then pull out a finished product that has been cooking for hours. Makes everything smell great the whole time too. Chicken and ribs are good choices.

Cook some sausage as well. This is the easiest thing to cook and the fastest. Could be a fatty or some links. Wets their appetites and shows just how simple BBQ can be. This also makes you a hero when you start handing them out during a long cook and everyone is impatient for you to finish. The pork riblets are also a great choice here instead of whole racks of ribs. Allows you to demonstrate different rubs and sauces too. My .02 MMV