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nthole
12-29-2007, 01:05 PM
Had a big cook yesterday (8 butts, 3 racks bbs, 2 fatties, 1 brisket and a partridge in a pear tree). Wasn't so much cold (30s) as it was just windy as chit. Got me back to thinking of doing a mod I've always meant to do but just never done for this winter.

My idea is basically the "PooBah Lounge Cushion" mod, only slight less visually appalling. For those not in the know PooBah strapped a lawn chair cushion to his Bandera one winter to help insulate and prevent heat loss to wind and cold.

What I would like to do is get some high heat foam board, something like an inch thick. Basically cut it to have one full sized sheet for the left side, one full sized sheet for the back side, about a half size sheet for the right (firebox) side (so the lid can still lift up and down), and a full size sheet for the top cut to let the smoke stack through. The plan is simply to grind out some little spots on the inside of the boards and glue in some magnets so the foam boards will just attach right to the smoke box, insulating and protecting from the wind.

So my main question is...what kind of foam board should I use, and where do I get it from?

Help is most appreciated.

Bbq Bubba
12-29-2007, 01:11 PM
I would try HD and look for the foil backed foam, that should keep it from getting the foam to hot.
If you measure correctly, you should be able to build a box and slip it over the pit instead of using magnet's (PIA mod)
Try uning drywall screw's or a ring shanked nail to hold the box together!
I want pic's if it work's!! :cool:

thirdeye
12-29-2007, 01:19 PM
I like the magnet idea. You can buy magnets in steel cases that will accept bolts or all thread. I'm wondering if you could rig the pieces with some stand-off distance, say 3/8", so the board would not have to be in direct contact with the pit. This could avoid the insulation getting too hot. The air trapped in between is a good insulator on it's own.

SP
12-29-2007, 01:22 PM
Look for insulation used in things like wrapping hot water heaters. It usually has a metallic skin and open end the can be sealed by duct tape ( the real stuff). It would be flexible but mount like you want and wouldn't damage as easy. Pretty easy to find. Watch it around the firebox.

chinesebob
12-29-2007, 01:34 PM
I threw a hotwater blanket over my chargriller to test out. Worked pretty well. Not a permanent solution but for the cold days it was nice. I'm going to do a brisket tomorrow so I'll let you know how it turns out.

Someone else pointed out putting fire bricks or lava rocks as a form of insulation in the bottom of the cooking area.

Other thing I thought about to just hold back the cold was putting the easy up with all four sides so it would reduce the wind chill factor. Partially for the cooker but also for me. It's dang cold out there.

I know you're not using that but for insulation ideas that's all I got.

NotleyQue
12-29-2007, 01:48 PM
I would look up a local insulation supply house, and see what they have. Some good high temp foil backed insulation (like the water heater blanket, but thicker) would be perfect. Easy to put on and off, and easy to store.

Just look up insulation in your yellow pages, and find a supplier. You could make a nice "blanket" for your smoker fairly inexpensively, and use foil tape to join it together.

wavector
12-29-2007, 02:42 PM
I read the magnets don't work well with heat.

smokinbadger
12-29-2007, 04:13 PM
I have built up a blueboard insulation shell for my Bandera, using a 4x8 sheet of 2" thick styrofoam from Home Depot, which worked OK. I also have a hot water heater insulating blanket I use on the horizontal section of my Klose, which also works pretty well. Probably even more important than the insulation is providing sufficient wind break around your smoker. The best thing I have found so far is my full size van, which has the advantage of not blowing over in the wind.

jestridge
12-29-2007, 04:33 PM
If you could find some old steel insulated doors prolly could make a good one out of them

chinesebob
12-30-2007, 12:53 AM
I have built up a blueboard insulation shell for my Bandera, using a 4x8 sheet of 2" thick styrofoam from Home Depot, which worked OK. I also have a hot water heater insulating blanket I use on the horizontal section of my Klose, which also works pretty well. Probably even more important than the insulation is providing sufficient wind break around your smoker. The best thing I have found so far is my full size van, which has the advantage of not blowing over in the wind.

The full size carport canopies are supposed to be pretty sturdy as well.

Napper
12-30-2007, 01:45 AM
If you get too close to the firebox you would need to use "foamglass". It is an industrial high temperature insulating material. It is rigid, very light, and easy to work with. Any waste you have left over can be used to clean grates!

Has a unique odor when you cut it. We call it "fart glass" at work!
If you make it permanent you will need to overcoat it with something as it is very fragile. Vermasco is an overcoat that is sometimes used.

Go by and talk to someone at an industrial insulation place or get you a MacMaster-Carr web link. http://www.mcmaster.com/

Not sure if McMaster-Carr carries foamglass but they have other high temperature insulation.

yelonutz
12-30-2007, 02:02 AM
Move! :-P Its midnight here in Chico,Ca. Low 50's and light rain! Nutz

Mark
12-31-2007, 01:56 PM
Industrial furnaces often use rigid mineral wool boards. I would further industrialize it with a sheet metal skin if I were tempted to insulate my Bandera. What I did instead, however, is surround my Bandera with steel office cubicle dividers, which were free.

ole'e
12-31-2007, 02:07 PM
When i had a offset I used a hotwater tank wrap from HD, the one that is shiney.
Eric

KC_Bobby
12-31-2007, 02:16 PM
I'm trying to figure out how foil on the back of the insulation would help ... follow me here.

The foil on the back of the insulation is going to get just as hot as the smoker after a few minutes if it's directly against the cabinet, thus the insulation is going to get hot too. I'm not sure, but I gotta think any insulation purchased from a retailer is fire retardent - but I guess it could still give off fumes/toxins if it reached a certain temp.

If so, and if one isn't using a high temp insulation, how about:

For something like a verticle smoker (maybe not a cylinder), get some sheet metal and build a box for 3 sides and top so it's larger then the smoke chamber by 2 inches wide by 1 inch taller. Then add the insulation to the outside of that. The foil insulation would be good and put the foil on the outside.

To hold the box an inch away on the 3 sides and top of the smoke chamber, add some bolts or screws in some strategic locations. Obvious mod will be for the exhaust - I think the builder could go just a bit larger than the exhaust with this and add a lip from the sheet metal.

This would:
- keep the wind off the smoke chamber
- add a barrier to keep warm air in/near the smoke chamber
- keep the insulation fairly cool

Overachievers might even add a second skin on the insulated box as well as fabricate it to cover parts of the firebox where possible. Then this could be used in wet weather too.

ole'e
12-31-2007, 06:24 PM
Bobby
I used one for a season without any problems. The main part of the pit is only going to be around 250. I will admit last winter I used a piece to lay across my traeger and it was running about 400* and it started to melt the outside coating of the hot water tank wrap I was using, so yes it does have its limits. There are some on the circuit who use those heavy moving blankets.
Eric