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Meat Burner
11-02-2007, 07:18 PM
I have just cooked packers on the UDS but thinking about some flats. Opinions on cooking a couple 8 lb flats vs one 14 lb packer. Would you do anything different? Do you think the cook time would be much different? I usually cook to about 165 and wrap to about 195, depending on how tender the meat is. The UDS will blaze a packer in about 7 hrs or so at 235 degrees. Appreciate any advise or suggestions.

Sawdustguy
11-02-2007, 08:10 PM
I would stick with the packers. When your brisket is done separate the point and flat. Take the point and put some more rub on it along with some sauce and throw it back in the smoker for a little while. Take it out, get a clever and go to town on the point. You will have some unbelievable burnt ends. Ummmmmm delicious.

bbqjoe
11-02-2007, 08:13 PM
I am afraid removing the point, or just cooking a flat is going to lead down the road to jerky.

Meat Burner
11-02-2007, 08:17 PM
I would stick with the packers. When your brisket is done separate the point and flat. Take the point and put some more rub on it along with some sauce and throw it back in the smoker for a little while. Take it out, get a clever and go to town on the point. You will have some unbelievable burnt ends. Ummmmmm delicious.

That's what I usually do cause we love bundt ends. This cook if for a charity event and I really only need the flat meat. Won't have time to serve burntd ends but may do one packer and leave on the smoker until the end of the event. Was more interested in the cook times and techniques for flats vs packers. Thanks for your help.

White Dog BBQ
11-02-2007, 08:18 PM
I've noticed on both my BGE and WSM that a packer cooks faster (per pound) than a flat, for some reason. I'm always at 2 lbs per pound on flats, but closer to 1.5 hours per pound on packers.

Note that I only cook flats with the fat cap intact, from Sam's.

Meat Burner
11-02-2007, 08:27 PM
[QUOTE=White Dog BBQ;490907]I've noticed on both my BGE and WSM that a packer cooks faster (per pound) than a flat, for some reason. I'm always at 2 lbs per pound on flats, but closer to 1.5 hours per pound on packers.

Note that I only cook flats with the fat cap intact, from Sam's.[/QTE]

That's interesting. That is why I wanted some input from the brethren because I am not sure how to plan this cook and not end up all night if I can help it. Thanks.

Meat Burner
11-02-2007, 09:35 PM
I am afraid removing the point, or just cooking a flat is going to lead down the road to jerky.

Joe, I actually did one flat on an offset my buddy has and it was farking awful. It wasn't jerky it was gawd awful goodyear tire rubber. Honest, I would not have given it to my dog. AWFUL just AWFUL, nasty, tough, tastless, terrible, more tough, just AWFUL. Now you know it was not tender and juicy...how do you do a nice flat with a decent fat cap and be as good as a packer? Maybe I cant? Most likely, it is just my lack of knowledge. Hate to admit that but it is most likely the problem. Help needed here!

kew_el_steve
11-03-2007, 07:08 AM
You obviously have not been enlightend to the Smoky Okie method yet!!! One of YOUR brothers. I seperate the point and flat and use this method. Although it sears the outside and looks ruined at first, this is the ONLY method that I use now. Try it once and you won't go back. And the smell is wonderful. Gets done about two hours faster too. Marinating or injecting works just fine with this method too. I've done both.

Put your faith in your brother Tim; he knows of what he speaks. Try it just once!!!

http://www.recipezaar.com/207187

P.S. I modify his method just a little. This is smoked in an aluminum pan. I do 3 hours up, then flip, then do another 3 hours on that side. Super penetration!!! Then foil and take to 195. But that's just me.

Sawdustguy
11-03-2007, 10:02 AM
Sorry for the first answer. This is what we do when we cook a flat. We prepare the flat the same as we do with a packer. We do not trim any fat at all. We rub and inject with a mixture of FAB B and apple juice. We cook the flat at 225* until about 160* to 170*. We remove the flat and put the flat in foil and pour in some Ricks Sinful Marinade. We close up the foil and cook until 195*. We put the flat in a cambro (or dry cooler) for 2 hours to rest and thats it.

Rick's Sinful Marinade

12 oz. can of beer
½ cup cider vinegar
½ cup of water
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons barbeque sauce
1 tablespoon seasoned salt or rub.
1 tablespoon celery seed
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Mix the ingredients and baste as necessary, or add when wrapping at about 165*.

I hope this helps.

Meat Burner
11-03-2007, 11:15 AM
Sawdustguy, thanks for the info. I am a big fan of basting and the recipe looks real good. That is what I am going to do. Am not real sure but I think the flat I cooked, that was so awful, was small and not foiled or basted..only remember how awful it was and have cooked packers since. This looks like a winner...thanks again.

bbqbull
11-03-2007, 01:02 PM
Just sent you and email.

Meat Burner
11-03-2007, 01:28 PM
Just sent you and email.

Thanks Michigan brother.8-)

smoke-n-my-i's
11-03-2007, 07:55 PM
I will add my 2 cents here as well. I agree, the flats will dry out faster as they are usually leaner.... unless you add bacon, or other fat to them.

I usually just do the packers, and separate, chop the point, throw it in a pan, and throw it back on the smoker.... I keep the burnt ends for myself, and chew on them later. The flat will be sliced for turn ins, or eaten by the family.

And the burnt ends in a dog bun with a little sauce is outta this world. And don't forget to add some sauted onions and peppers.