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Kung Fu BBQ
10-09-2007, 12:33 AM
I tried this for the first time. Rubbing down ribs and then cryovacing them. I think it back fired on me. Sadly this is something I did for the first time during a contest with my turn in meat. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Ribs may have been the wrong meat to try this with.

Has anyone had any luck doing this? Pros/cons?

swamprb
10-09-2007, 03:57 AM
No pre-seasoned meat allowed.

Kung Fu BBQ
10-09-2007, 09:45 AM
no, I mean doing it at home or at a comp.... after the meat has been inspected of course. Theory was that it wouldn't have to sit as long prior to cooking by seasoning in a cryovac bag.

RichardF
10-09-2007, 09:49 AM
I tried this for the first time. Rubbing down ribs and then cryovacing them. I think it back fired on me. Sadly this is something I did for the first time during a contest with my turn in meat. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Ribs may have been the wrong meat to try this with.

Has anyone had any luck doing this? Pros/cons?

Did they end up mushy and over-tenderized??? What was in the rub? anything other than the typical (if there is a typical) spice mix?

lwest99
10-09-2007, 10:24 AM
I have thought the same thing about using a food saver to marinade meat. I even tried it once. Several people have convinced me that that may not be the best thing unless you are using the special meat quick marinator. (which is not big enough to hold a brisket or a slab of ribs http://www.foodsaver.com/ProductDetails.aspx?productid=1954).

If you just us the bags it ends up compressing the pores of the meat and will not let the flavor in. I have not done it but they use the example of foodsaving a marshmallow. If you do it in the quick marinator it will blow up a couple of times bigger but if you use the bags it will be compressed to a smaller size.

Just my .02

Kung Fu BBQ
10-09-2007, 10:45 AM
I was not at all happy. It worked a little too well on the ribs. The were mushy, the rub flavor was overpowering. The rub was my own, good amounts of salt and sugar. We tried it on a butt also but I never tasted the results.

Markbb
10-09-2007, 10:55 AM
I think that if you did the butt with the vaccum it'll work, but not the ribs to much surface area, whereas you don't have as much on the butt and or a brisket..

jvreeland
10-09-2007, 11:11 AM
I have tried it on butts and it was ok - no real differance for me though then just rubbing it down the night before.

Bill-Chicago
10-09-2007, 11:47 AM
I was trying to dig up the thread where Phil did this with a boneless skinless chicken breast.

Turned into pure mush

billm
10-09-2007, 11:57 AM
I tried this for the first time. Rubbing down ribs and then cryovacing them. I think it back fired on me. Sadly this is something I did for the first time during a contest with my turn in meat. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Ribs may have been the wrong meat to try this with.

Has anyone had any luck doing this? Pros/cons?
ribs are one meat i dont season until im readyd to throw them on the cooker..get too much of a hammy taste otherwise in my experience

Kung Fu BBQ
10-09-2007, 01:12 PM
ribs are one meat i dont season until im readyd to throw them on the cooker..get too much of a hammy taste otherwise in my experience

Thats the conclusion I came to also. I cooked Ribs Friday night: rubbed them down threw them in. Everyone who ate them thought they were killer.
Comp ribs: I rubbed down the night before and sealed.... I was so mad at the result and for choosing to do it.

Wine & Swine
10-09-2007, 01:43 PM
We use cryo machines alot both at home and the restaurant. Timing is everything as the window between good and overpowered/mush can be quite fine. If I am doing meat I usually cryo plain first (nothing on the meat) to open the cell walls and than add the rub/marinade and reseal for a short time on smaller cuts (individual steak, etc). I use our machines ALOT (I have gone through 5 residential units in 5 months) and I use them for everything from portion control to making my own infused booze (I have done everything from peach & vanilla "moonshine" to fresh horseradish vodka) and have found that 10 minutes can be the difference between great and disgusting especially with big flavor profile things like horseradish. But in the end experimenting seems to be a necessity. Ed, our chef has been working with cyro'ing for years and knows alot about the science of food if you want to know more.