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View Full Version : Building Smokezilla, how thick is too thick?


smooookin
06-26-2007, 08:11 PM
I have access to some old casing, this stuff is 24 in diameter and darn close to inch thick! I am figuring once you get it to temp you could maintain it with a bic lighter.

The plans in my head call for a four foot cooking chamber and a 2 ft fire box. My original Idea to pipe the heat/smoke via a piece of box channel with a series of holes going from smaller to larger as the distance increases from the firebox. Obviously I will need a counter weight system for the single door, a trailer and maybe a ton to pull it. LOL

So, is in too thick? The smaller thickness is smaller diameter so it wont work. oh yeah i forgot to mention i can get it for 25 or 30 dollars a foot. i haven bought steel like this but i am thinking it is a good price even after i sand blast it. thoughts?

Yakfishingfool
06-26-2007, 08:15 PM
My only thought would be th eamount of energy needed to heat it up. f it's significant, you may take too long to get it to temp. also consider that once at "A" temp, it may be difficult getting the mass to a different temp. Scott

QansasjayhawQ
06-26-2007, 08:16 PM
Is that 24" inside or outside diameter?

smooookin
06-26-2007, 08:32 PM
Is that 24" inside or outside diameter?


i believe it is inside diameter.


good point Scott!

anyone else wanna chime in?

gunrunner2491
06-26-2007, 08:54 PM
Smoookin, I have 20" casing 4' long, 1/2" thickness with a 2' fire box, 1/2" thick also, the pit without the trailer weighs about 750 Lbs. estimated. The door is manageable, but I have plans to put a counter weight. As for cooking I put about 10 Lbs. of charcoal in the fire box. It takes almost thirty to forty minutes for it to come up to temp, but after it does I feed it 1 log about every 45 minutes to an hour I have no problem. What I have found through experience is once it is up to temp I have no real trouble staying at about 250. The only time I get extreme fluctuation in temp is when I neglect to take the ashes out from under the fire. The pit smokes great occasionally if I'm smoking I will use a water bath and it helps keep an even temp through the pit, but if I am cooking various meats such as chicken I keep them closer to the fire box end . Sausages and things of that nature I keep them on my second rack and it works just fine. I have been looking through different threads, and I am going to invest in a charcoal box I think it will be a nice accessory to the pit, and I am interested to see if I can get longer burns at the same temp. I hope this information helps.

smooookin
06-26-2007, 09:00 PM
thanks for the info Gun! i think we are gonna give it a go. my wife thinks i am nuts but she says "whatever ya want" and shakes her head and laughs.

gunrunner2491
06-26-2007, 09:26 PM
In my pit I have put 5 briskets on the bottom shelf and 3 briskets on the top shelf, and it worked out fine. I think you'll be happy with the build. I am still working on mine it is a work in progress. I am sending the pit to the welder in about a week, when I can get some time off work. He is going to widen the frame to my trailer and move the pit over to the left side to give me room for the wood box. I still need to add the shelf in front of the pit and add the burners and the frame for my ice chest and water can, and my propane tank I also need to buy 2 4X8 sheets of sheet metal 1/4" thick. It might be overkill but I want a sturdy floor for the trailer and everything I am going to put on it. also use a weed burner to light my fires that's a big help. I figure I have about another $1500.00 until I complete my project. When it's completed I will post pics, I am a little embarrassed to post a pic of it now because it is just the frame and the pit. I know some of these guys here play with the big boys and I wouldn't want to take a knife to a gun fight.

Meat Burner
06-26-2007, 09:47 PM
Gun, sounds like you have a great plan. Keep us posed, with pics, of this build. OBTW, 99% of the time, give me the knife!

gunrunner2491
06-26-2007, 10:03 PM
Point taken Meat burner. No pun intended.

thirdeye
06-26-2007, 10:27 PM
I have access to some old casing, this stuff is 24 in diameter and darn close to inch thick! I am figuring once you get it to temp you could maintain it with a bic lighter.

The plans in my head call for a four foot cooking chamber and a 2 ft fire box. My original Idea to pipe the heat/smoke via a piece of box channel with a series of holes going from smaller to larger as the distance increases from the firebox. Obviously I will need a counter weight system for the single door, a trailer and maybe a ton to pull it. LOL

So, is in too thick? The smaller thickness is smaller diameter so it wont work. oh yeah i forgot to mention i can get it for 25 or 30 dollars a foot. i haven bought steel like this but i am thinking it is a good price even after i sand blast it. thoughts?

24" X .500 wall pipe is 125 pounds/foot, if that makes any difference in your plans. I've seen plenty of oil field cookers made with pipe that heavy and they are nice.

Is that 24" inside or outside diameter?

Typically pipe up to and including 12", the size represents the ID. 14" and larger, the size represents the OD. So 24" pipe would have an ID of 23".

parrothead
06-27-2007, 06:44 AM
You could plumb it with gas to get it up to temp faster. Then go to your charcoal and/or wood. This would also be good for after everything gets it's smoke and you have nothing in there but foil wrapped stuff.

fivelombardis
06-27-2007, 09:36 AM
do it...we bought my Dad one for father's day years ago and once those suckers are up to temp, it takes an idiot to mess up a piece of meat!!