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View Full Version : Any good guides to DIY butchering (but for the smoker)?


Debmar
12-04-2019, 08:55 PM
We raise our own livestock and I have done my own butchering, cutting and wrapping the last couple years (for sheep and pigs, have not done my own steers yet) but over the last year got into smoking on a UDS I built and am enjoying the results. I was hoping I could find a guide online to how to cut and wrap with smoking in mind for the end product. as in trying to size and cut to maximize the suitability of the end product when destined for the smoker. I have not been able to find anything, maybe such a thing does not exist but thought I would ask here.

I think the biggest difference would be in the front end of the animal (shoulder) but I am not sure as I am fairly new to this. Curious if any of you might do this yourself as well and if you have found any good resources you used as you learned the ropes.

Any suggestions? Thanks

Stlsportster
12-04-2019, 11:30 PM
I’m betting Norm and cowgirl have some advice on this.

ModelMaker
12-05-2019, 08:17 AM
I have watched dozens of butchering videos on Youtube (yea retirement!) it's all there and very informative.
Ed

sudsandswine
12-05-2019, 08:18 AM
I took a class on breaking down a pig from a local artisan style butcher...maybe you can check around and see if there’s something similar in your area. I enjoyed it quite a bit. I’m trying to eat through my freezer stash to make room for a pig so I can DIY.

The butcher I shadowed practices “seam butchery”, which as the name indicates, uses a lot of the seams between the muscles to guide the break down. This was familiar to me because that’s exactly what I had been doing with pork butts when I want to isolate the money muscle or tubes or retain certain parts for cooking instead of using as grind for sausage.


You may find this link interesting. There’s a handy PDF at the end.

https://www.instructables.com/id/Austrian-Seam-Butchery-at-Home/

KC Smoke
12-05-2019, 08:46 AM
Check out the UK College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment on YouTube. They have several videos breaking down different animals from halves and primal cuts. There's a ton of really good info. There's some interesting takeaways for knife technique too.

Norm
12-05-2019, 09:16 AM
Here's a youtube channel I follow that is a great source for DIY.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0r6S4hmYdRcDnw7zey7Myg/videos

I'm heading out to MD Anderson in a bit so will be in and out but would sure be happy to answer any other question you might have.

sudsandswine
12-05-2019, 09:29 AM
This one is good too

https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCORAP6VI7pzMNJhNhPVSJ9Q

Grain Belt
12-05-2019, 10:30 AM
What a great thread! It is refreshing to be on a site where helpful information is shared.

DUBBAGA
12-05-2019, 11:14 AM
Here's a youtube channel I follow that is a great source for DIY.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0r6S4hmYdRcDnw7zey7Myg/videos

I'm heading out to MD Anderson in a bit so will be in and out but would sure be happy to answer any other question you might have.


+1 on Norm's recommendation ... The Bearded Butchers' videos are highly informative

thirdeye
12-05-2019, 11:32 AM
I agree that videos will help a lot. And also check out your public library for books on home butchering.

Debmar
12-05-2019, 08:45 PM
Everyone who replied
Did a quick overview and they all look very good
Hope to make use of them next week
It will definitely help

gcs
12-07-2019, 06:54 AM
The videos are very interesting, and show the proscribed methods that you should know, but once you have the basic idea, you can cut stuff anyway you want, it's your meat and your not selling the proscribed cuts.
Bigger, smaller, whatever you like, it all tastes good...

Badjak
12-08-2019, 01:17 PM
Check out Scott Rea's video's.
They are pretty good

cowgirl
12-08-2019, 02:06 PM
The videos are very interesting, and show the proscribed methods that you should know, but once you have the basic idea, you can cut stuff anyway you want, it's your meat and your not selling the proscribed cuts.
Bigger, smaller, whatever you like, it all tastes good...

I like to do this. When butchering, I custom cut to the size and cut that suits my needs. A 5lb hunk of green ham is going to be easier for me to cure, smoke and eat than a whole hind leg. I like to debone a lot of my cuts too, for easier storage in the freezer OR for canning.

One of the best ways to learn is by participating in a live butcher. Find someone who will take the time to show you, if you don't have parents or grandparents around.