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Steeb
04-27-2007, 10:39 AM
I'm about as new as you can get to the fine art of smoking and was hoping to get the advice of some experts. I'm thinking of trying a brisket and was wondering what you guys use to season yours. Is it just something like salt, pepper, and garlic? Do you use the same rub you use for ribs? None of the above?

I'd really appreciate any advice you can offer. If it helps, I'm using a Weber Performer (gas ignite, otherwise it's charcoal) and I have been using woodchips soaked in water for the smoke. So far, I've only used hickory (which was a little strong for my taste, but I may not be using it correctly) and apple. I also have a bag of oak, which is what I think I'll use for the brisket - unless you guys suggest otherwise. Thanks in advance for your help!

Harbormaster
04-27-2007, 11:08 AM
I'm at work, so I don't have the exact proportions, but my brisket rub is basically brown sugar, sea salt, black pepper, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder. Pretty simple, and pretty tasty too!

Steeb
04-27-2007, 11:20 AM
I'm at work, so I don't have the exact proportions, but my brisket rub is basically brown sugar, sea salt, black pepper, chili powder, paprika, garlic powder. Pretty simple, and pretty tasty too!
Oooh - that sounds pretty good. If you wouldn't mind (and if you remember,) I would really appreciate getting the proportions once you're at home and have the opportunity. That sounds like a good starter recipe for me - nice and simple, just like I like it! :biggrin:

Do you just coat the whole thing before putting it in the smoker? Do you do any amount of direct searing at the beginning for the outside? (I've seen that done with prime rib before, but I have no idea if that would be proper with a brisket.)

Thanks for the advice! I really appreciate it.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 11:41 AM
I would not sear.

Rub the entire thing, just try and stack the coals as far to one side of the kettle as possible, and try to indirectly cook it.

I would start with 10-15 coals at the most, and go grab a bag of hickory chunks at Home Despot

If you dont have hinged grates, then stick with the chips, and one an hour throw a hand full onto the coals.

Shoot for 275*-300* heat temp (search "Fast Cook Method" and it might help) and check out the brisket threads in RoadMap for varying opinions on internal temp, foil usage, etc.

Good luck, and post results!

Edit: strong hickory in forst post, just caught that. Stick with the apple then, but the beef should be able to handle the hickory better than things like poultry. If you are using too much hickory, it might start tasting too strong too.

VitaminQ
04-27-2007, 11:41 AM
I generally don't bother rubbing the fat cap, since it will end up rendering off or getting trimmed. That being said, it usually ends up acquiring a fair amount of rub anyway.

I wouldn't bother with trying to sear a brisket. It's a whole different animal from prime rib (although it is from the same animal). Just build a coal bed on one side of the kettle, put the brisket on the opposite side, put on the lid and smoke away! And don't peek! Keep us posted, and post pics when you're done!

Hoorenga
04-27-2007, 11:48 AM
I don't like the same rub on my ribs that I use on my brisket. I find that there is a big difference. I used to use one rub on everything but with the Sauce and Rub swap I came into some good Rib rubs that turned me around on the idea of one for all. Sugar in a rub can some times be an issue because it will burn black easily. Thats one reason you don't want to start basting your ribs with sauce (if you are so inclined) until the end, otherwise the sugar will burn.

Harbormaster
04-27-2007, 11:53 AM
Steeb,
I trim up the packer, rub everything pretty thoroughly, and put it in the WSM. No advance searing. I run the dome temp at about 250-265. Last 2 were without water (Piedmont Pan) but i'll be going back to water for brisket.
You don't indicate what you cook on.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 11:55 AM
I generally don't bother rubbing the fat cap, since it will end up rendering off or getting trimmed. That being said, it usually ends up acquiring a fair amount of rub anyway.



VQ brings something up that I think will be very important.

I personally cook with the fat cap down after a discussion here with Jim Minion. It seems to "protect" the meat from the heat (in my verticals)

But regardless of whether you are in the cap up/cap down camp, I think that, in a kettle, the cat Must be down, because of the proximity to the heat source. You want to protect that bottom from becoming shoe leather from being inches from the heat source.

Others will differ, but that is the beauty of BBQ!

Steeb
04-27-2007, 12:11 PM
Wow - tons of great advice. Thanks a lot guys! Looks like the consensus is to not sear - sounds good to me and keeps things simple.

I think my aversion to hickory stems from me using too many chips at one time. Maybe I'll try hickory again for the brisket - only this time I'll stick to a handful every hour or so, as suggested. I do want to try that oak sometime, though. Too many decisions...

Now to search for "done" temps. Thanks again, guys!

Thanks for the tips on cooking with the fat cap down - I would not have thought of trying that.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 12:16 PM
Cap up, or cap down, put an aluminum pan under the brisket (maybe a little water in it) for the fat to drip into, otherwise you'll have a mess on the "floor/walls" of the Performer

Bigmista
04-27-2007, 12:16 PM
If this is your first brisket, I would keep the seasonings simple so you have a frame of reference for future briskets. Salt, pepper and maybe some garlic powder. Fat cap down to protect the bottom. Trim off the really hard parts of the fat but leave everything else. Keep the brisket as far away from the heat as possible. Take lots of pictures and post them here.
Post if you need help. We will be happy to give you pointers and walk you thru it.

Steeb
04-27-2007, 12:28 PM
Cap up, or cap down, put an aluminum pan under the brisket (maybe a little water in it) for the fat to drip into, otherwise you'll have a mess on the "floor/walls" of the Performer
Thanks. I was actually already planning to do that - I bought some pans yesterday. Good call on the mess part - I was gonna use the pan just to add some moisture - it never occurred to me that this is probably gonna be messy. I'm used to direct cooking, where everything ends up on the coals. This will only be my third try at indirect cooking, so I'm still getting used to all of the little details.:-P

Steeb
04-27-2007, 12:36 PM
If this is your first brisket, I would keep the seasonings simple so you have a frame of reference for future briskets. Salt, pepper and maybe some garlic powder. Fat cap down to protect the bottom. Trim off the really hard parts of the fat but leave everything else. Keep the brisket as far away from the heat as possible. Take lots of pictures and post them here.
Post if you need help. We will be happy to give you pointers and walk you thru it.
So you think I should hold off on a rub that includes sugar? That's probably a good idea, since I'm still way green when it comes to this stuff. I'll try to remember to take some pictures - I have a decent digital camera that should get the job done.

Is there a set temp that you like to aim for? I've read 160, 180, 185, etc. I generally like my meat medium to medium-well, if that helps at all.

Thanks again for all the help. You guys have taught me more in a morning than I could have learned on my own in a week.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 12:42 PM
So you think I should hold off on a rub that includes sugar? That's probably a good idea, since I'm still way green when it comes to this stuff. I'll try to remember to take some pictures - I have a decent digital camera that should get the job done.

Is there a set temp that you like to aim for? I've read 160, 180, 185, etc. I generally like my meat medium to medium-well, if that helps at all.

Thanks again for all the help. You guys have taught me more in a morning than I could have learned on my own in a week.

I agree with Mista, no sugar, S&P.

Medium to Medium Well is a steak setting. Forget it. Medium brisket would be tough. I won't even say Well Done, for that is a steak term. You want temperature

Personally, I would take it up to 165* internal, wrapp in foil after spraying thouroughly with apple juice, then return to the grill until you reach 190* internal.

I would then remove and place, still wrapped in foil, in an empty cooler. If none available, then two targe towels wrapped around it will work.

After about 2 hours or so, CAREFULLY unwrap. It should be juicy, possibly very juicy.

Open in a pan to retain those Au Jus juices.

Slice to pencil width thickness (if it doesnt just fall apart :razz: )

Enjoy!

Hoorenga
04-27-2007, 12:53 PM
So far, I've only used hickory (which was a little strong for my taste, but I may not be using it correctly) and apple. I also have a bag of oak, which is what I think I'll use for the brisket

In my opinion you shouldn't be soaking the wood chips in water. Contrary to what would seem obvious, it isn't the visible part of the smoke that imparts the flavor. When you wet the wood chips it is akin to using green wood and you are going to get more of the visible smoke which is the part you don't want. That's the stuff that tastes horrible and soots up your chimney. You want a nice clean burn with only the light blue smoke if any visble. Brisket is also very easy to over smoke so easy does it. I think this is why you are finding when you use hickory that it has a strong flavor. It is actually pretty mellow. If you are doing a long burn in the smoker you don't have to "smoke" it the whole time for good results.

Hoo

Bigmista
04-27-2007, 12:53 PM
There's and old saying, "It's done, when it's done." That being said, here are a few things to looks for...

1. Shoot for a temp of about 190 degrees.

2. Stick your temperature probe into the thickest part of the brisket. If it slides in with almost no resistance (like you were sticking it into semi-melted butter) it's done.

3. Wrap it in foil and put it in a cooler (No ICE!) for at least an hour.

4. Slice and eat!

Steeb
04-27-2007, 12:57 PM
I agree with Mista, no sugar, S&P.

Medium to Medium Well is a steak setting. Forget it. Medium brisket would be tough. I won't even say Well Done, for that is a steak term. You want temperature

Personally, I would take it up to 165* internal, wrapp in foil after spraying thouroughly with apple juice, then return to the grill until you reach 190* internal.

I would then remove and place, still wrapped in foil, in an empty cooler. If none available, then two targe towels wrapped around it will work.

After about 2 hours or so, CAREFULLY unwrap. It should be juicy, possibly very juicy.

Open in a pan to retain those Au Jus juices.

Slice to pencil width thickness (if it doesnt just fall apart :razz: )

Enjoy!
So that's what the cooler's for in all of those 3-2-1 methods. Makes sense - I was thinking you were putting the meat in the fridge (yeah, sounds dumb now, but I figured you guys knew what you were doing.)

Thanks for the lesson on the temp. I'll probably do just as you said above. Now I need to go out and buy a thermometer (should have had this already) and a spray bottle for the apple juice. I'm excited - this is gonna be fun.

Just to clarify, you're recommending 275*-300* rather than a lower (225-250*) cooking temp for this, right?

brdbbq
04-27-2007, 01:07 PM
Just to clarify, you're recommending 275*-300* rather than a lower (225-250*) cooking temp for this, right?

For Brisket no Pork Loin yea

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 01:08 PM
If you can get 225*, go for it!!

I have a hard time keeping below 250* in my kettle, so thats why I suggested the higher amounts.

You will need to add a couple "lit" coals during the cook no mater what to maintain your temp range.

Pyrex probe thermometers are $15 at Meijer.

Sometimes people will even run hot water in their cooler, to "pre warm" it, but this shouldn't be necessary. The point is to just bring down the temps slowly. I leave the probe in there, and keep the thermometer on the top of the cooler. When I see 160-165*, I know its cool enough to slice without burning my fingers!!

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 01:14 PM
For Brisket no Pork Loin yea


I actually cook all of them the same way.

Chusck roasts, pork loins, briskets, pork butts, all of them

165*-Wrap-190*-Cooler-160ish-Eat

Thats just me, but its harder to fark up temps when I treat them all the same.

Besides, I'm sometimes 10 hours into a case of beer too

Mooner
04-27-2007, 01:25 PM
If this is your first brisket, I would keep the seasonings simple so you have a frame of reference for future briskets. Salt, pepper and maybe some garlic powder. Fat cap down to protect the bottom. Trim off the really hard parts of the fat but leave everything else. Keep the brisket as far away from the heat as possible. Take lots of pictures and post them here.
Post if you need help. We will be happy to give you pointers and walk you thru it.

When the guys see this long post their gonna do this :roll: :roll: but I love brisket so im gonna give you my 411.
First off I agree with both Mista's posts, secondly if this is your first brisket chances are you may screw it up so be prepared (I screwed up like 5 before I got an edible one). Stick with the basics and listen to what the guys have said and yours may be great the first time around. LOL, I didn't have the Brethren for guidance when I started out so your lucky Steeb :biggrin: .

But as far as brisket goes, use a simple rub...salt, pepper, garlic powder. Or buy a commercial rub from the store or a butcher shop that specialized in brisket or beef. I would not use sugar!!! in my opinion brisket gains nothing by being sweet and the sugar will just blacken anyway. Depending how long you want to fool with it I would cook it low and slow. 225 for about 1.5 hours per pound. Use a meat thermometor to gauge the internal temp but don't go through the point, insert it through the side into the thickest part of the flat going all the way into the center (if you have no idea what im talking about just post a reply, someone will fill you in). When it hits 190-195 its done, carry over heat will take it up another 3-5 degrees. Or another very smart way you can tell is take a metal or wooden skewer and stick it into the flat next to your probe thermometor when it startes to reach these temps. When it goes in like your running it through room temp butter its done! If you feel any resistance, even the slightest let it keep cooking. Check it every 3 degrees after 190.

I hope it turns out well man. I would buy a whole brisket if you can find it and cut a lot of the fat off in between the point and the flat then smoke it like you would anything else. If your short on time try the fast method listed above, 325-350 and it should be done in about 5-6 hours but the internal temp test is a must!!. Good luck brother and post a pic of the finished product. We all love to sound smart and feel even better when our advice helps someone turn out some great Q :lol: :lol: OK, im done rambling and being a know it all I swear. Boy I love this place!!!!!!

OH FARK!!
P.S. You may know this already but im gonna tell ya anyway.....make sure, make sure, make sure that you slice it AGAINST the grain of the meat. You can tell by flipping it over and looking at which way the meat fibers run. I would cut off 1/2 inch of the tip so it helps you slice the correct way when it's cooked. So if the grain runs east and west, cut north and south. Ok I really am done now I swear.....

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 01:59 PM
OH FARK!!
P.S. You may know this already but im gonna tell ya anyway.....make sure, make sure, make sure that you slice it AGAINST the grain of the meat. You can tell by flipping it over and looking at which way the meat fibers run. I would cut off 1/2 inch of the tip so it helps you slice the correct way when it's cooked. So if the grain runs east and west, cut north and south. Ok I really am done now I swear.....

Doh!!

I forgot one of the basic things!!

Good call Jordan.

I take 2 toothpick and at each end, about an inch in on the top, I will put the toothpick in on a down angle, with the grain.

I do the same at the other end, roughly parralel to the first one.

When the brisket is done, it has so warped, shrunk, deformed, etc, that the two toothpick can be almost in a V pattern (if long enough to touch)

I leave one in the one side, for I will only slice up half. Easy to cut across the grain and you know eactly where it is. Sometimes, the grain will change course, and you adjust your angle.

Good call!

Steeb
04-27-2007, 03:02 PM
Thanks for all the tips, guys. My head's spinning.:biggrin: I'm off to the store - hopefully I can find a fairly small brisket to start off with, since I'm sure I'll screw it up in some way or another (I always seem to do something wrong the first time.) I think you've armed me with enough info to get me by, but I'll be sure to post back if I run into any issues. While I'm thinking about it, let me clarify the wood thing: you're saying that I should not soak the wood chips (I'm using charcoal as the main fuel.) And with this method, do you still recommend a handful of chips every hour or so?

Thanks again, guys. Much appreciated!

qman
04-27-2007, 04:47 PM
So that's what the cooler's for in all of those 3-2-1 methods. Makes sense - I was thinking you were putting the meat in the fridge (yeah, sounds dumb now, but I figured you guys knew what you were doing.)

Thanks for the lesson on the temp. I'll probably do just as you said above. Now I need to go out and buy a thermometer (should have had this already) and a spray bottle for the apple juice. I'm excited - this is gonna be fun.

Just to clarify, you're recommending 275*-300* rather than a lower (225-250*) cooking temp for this, right?


Hey, Steeb--here is another tip. Since you are cooking in your backyard, if you don't want to use a cooler, you can wrap your foiled brisket in a couple of heavy towels, and then just stick it in your micro-wave to rest.

[dont turn it on of course:rolleyes: ]

One of the best uses I have found for a microwave.

thirdeye
04-27-2007, 05:58 PM
The last time I saw a brisket thread with this much good information was.... was...was, well it I'm sure it was right here. I think all you brisketeers have covered about everything from seasoning that chunk of chest until it goes into the cooler. Now two more questions. Do you add any liquid to the foil? How long do you like to leave it?

I add broth/aujus/wooster and like to let it sit for at least 4 hours.

Bigmista
04-27-2007, 06:04 PM
Do you add any liquid to the foil? How long do you like to leave it?

I add broth/aujus/wooster and like to let it sit for at least 4 hours.

If I inject, I add leftover injection. Otherwise, I add whatever is handy. Apple Juice. Beer. Worsey. Bourbon. Tequilla. Whatever brings something to the party besides water.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 06:13 PM
Now two more questions. Do you add any liquid to the foil? How long do you like to leave it?




Personally, I would take it up to 165* internal, wrapp in foil after spraying thouroughly with apple juice, then return to the grill until you reach 190* internal.





Sometimes people will even run hot water in their cooler, to "pre warm" it, but this shouldn't be necessary. The point is to just bring down the temps slowly. I leave the probe in there, and keep the thermometer on the top of the cooler. When I see 160-165*, I know its cool enough to slice without burning my fingers!!

Caveat, I would leave it longer if I could stand to.

I grab my thick pork pulling rubber gloves and go to town.

The only thing this thread lacks is 3eye's pictorials :wink:

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 06:18 PM
The last time I saw a brisket thread with this much good information was.... was...was, well it I'm sure it was right here. I think all you brisketeers have covered about everything from seasoning that chunk of chest until it goes into the cooler.

Didnt see a beginner brisket kettle thread in the Roadmap, so this just got added.

Good call 3eye

thirdeye
04-27-2007, 06:33 PM
Caveat, I would leave it longer if I could stand to.

I grab my thick pork pulling rubber gloves and go to town.

The only thing this thread lacks is 3eye's pictorials :wink:

Since we are are on a "drum roll" lately, here's one. I mean three. As long as you got a fire going anyway mod.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/BDS/35683514.jpg

Didnt see a beginner brisket kettle thread in the Roadmap, so this just got added.

Good call 3eye

Although not specifically geared to beginners, this is a good thread .....

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9719&highlight=brisket

Bigmista
04-27-2007, 06:56 PM
Wow! Never done 3 briskets on one shelf before. I've done 2 and 1 and just kept rotating them.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 07:38 PM
Since we are are on a "drum roll" lately, here's one. I mean three. As long as you got a fire going anyway mod.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v377/thirdeye2/BDS/35683514.jpg



Although not specifically geared to beginners, this is a good thread .....

http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9719&highlight=brisket

This thread is already in there.

Its #21 or 22, noted by Trout

The only reason I put this one in there was I think it is the first kettle brisket thread, more than a beginner thread.

But great call 3eye, the RoadMap is a MUST READ for all.

Steeb
04-27-2007, 07:41 PM
Well, I didn't have any luck at the any of my nearby grocery stores, so it's off to Costco this evening. They should have them for sure. I'm planning everything for tomorrow, assuming I can find a hunk of meat tonight, so I may be posting in a panic sometime tomorrow with issues.:eek:

Kirk
04-27-2007, 08:52 PM
So that's what the cooler's for in all of those 3-2-1 methods.
These guys have given you some good advice but I just want to clarify something for you here. The 321 method has nothing to do with brisket, that's a method for cooking ribs and there is no cooler employed with that method. The name comes from the technique of cooking the ribs for 3 hrs, wrapping them in foil and putting them back in the cooker for 2 hrs, then removing the foil and put them back in the cooker for one hour. Basically you're cooking for color first (unwrapped), then tenderness (wrapped) and then to tighten up the meat a bit and set the sauce or glaze if you're using them (unwrapped). There's lots of info on the site if you use the search function.
If I could add one piece of advice for the brisket cook, it would be to resist the urge to lift the lid unless you have to add fuel or check for doneness. If you keep taking the lid off, you're going to have a long miserable time trying to get that brisket to finish.
Good luck and don't hesitate to ask questions. You won't find a more helpful (and knowledgeable) bunch of bbq fanatics on the internet than these guys.

CajunSmoker
04-27-2007, 08:56 PM
If this is your first brisket, I would keep the seasonings simple so you have a frame of reference for future briskets. Salt, pepper and maybe some garlic powder. Fat cap down to protect the bottom. Trim off the really hard parts of the fat but leave everything else. Keep the brisket as far away from the heat as possible. Take lots of pictures and post them here.
Post if you need help. We will be happy to give you pointers and walk you thru it.


I love it when you talk like that:biggrin: That is the most important part of cooking a brisket in my opinion

Steeb
04-27-2007, 09:50 PM
Okay, I may have an issue here. The only kind of brisket I was able to find today was a Choice flat cut brisket. It's about 2 inches thick at its thickest point. Is this doable, or will I have to cook this in the oven and find a better cut?

Mr. Bo
04-27-2007, 09:56 PM
It's always doable Steeb. Adjustment of cooking times & temps will still smoke a great small brisket. What's the weight on this one?

Mooner
04-27-2007, 09:59 PM
Okay, I may have an issue here. The only kind of brisket I was able to find today was a Choice flat cut brisket. It's about 2 inches thick at its thickest point. Is this doable, or will I have to cook this in the oven and find a better cut?

It will still work and actually for your first one may be easier. All a flat cut is is a brisket that's had the point removed. Just follow the plan and cook away. Time will be significantly less on this cut but the internal temp range is still the same 190-195. Slice against the grain!! :wink:

Steeb
04-27-2007, 10:02 PM
It's always doable Steeb. Adjustment of cooking times & temps will still smoke a great small brisket. What's the weight on this one?
Duh - sorry, forgot to mention the weight. My bad. 5.80 lbs.

Would I still figure 1.5 hours/lb or would it be different since it's thinner? I'll still go by the internal temp, of course, but it's always helpful to have a ballpark figure to work with (especially for noobs like me.)

Thanks for all of the help, guys.

Bill-Chicago
04-27-2007, 10:25 PM
I cook 5 to 7# flats from Costco

Go for it!

thirdeye
04-27-2007, 10:31 PM
Wow! Never done 3 briskets on one shelf before. I've done 2 and 1 and just kept rotating them.

I started the bigger of the 3 on the lower grate. After about 6 hours they had all shrunk enough to fit all 3 on the upper grate. (That was just over 40 pounds worth).

Steeb
04-28-2007, 02:46 PM
Well, I'm a little over five hours in with the brisket. So far so good (I think.) I've been keeping it right around 225-230*, with the occasional fluctuation (up to 250* and as low as 210*,) but I've tried to keep those to a minimum. I've only had a couple of spikes where it went to 250 and they lasted for around five minutes or so. Hopefully it won't mess it up to bad, but I'm honestly not expecting much out of this one. I just checked the temp and it was at about 133*, so I have a ways to go before I spray it with apple juice and wrap it with foil. I've taken a few pics and hope to have them up this evening or tomorrow.

CajunSmoker
04-28-2007, 03:33 PM
250 won't hurt anything. You can spray any time you want to, you don't have to wait until you foil.

Norcoredneck
04-28-2007, 03:50 PM
If your lookin you ain't cookin! Sit back have a beer or three.:-P

Mooner
04-28-2007, 04:41 PM
If your lookin you ain't cookin! Sit back have a beer or three.:-P


There's no truer statement when it comes to Que...:eusa_clap

Steeb
04-28-2007, 04:49 PM
If your lookin you ain't cookin! Sit back have a beer or three.:-P
Yep, and I'm totally lookin more than I should be. I can't help it. :redface: Time to take your advice...:-D

Steeb
04-28-2007, 04:50 PM
250 won't hurt anything. You can spray any time you want to, you don't have to wait until you foil.
Cool. Thanks. I'll do that now, then.

Steeb
04-29-2007, 12:32 AM
Well, I'm now fifteen hours in and I'm at 188*. It should be almost done now and then I can pop it into the cooler. I definitely opened the lid too many times today. Still, it looks pretty decent, though I'm not 100% sure what a brisket's supposed to look like at this stage. I did have one question, if there's anyone still up: would it be okay to leave it in the cooler over night, or should I take it out and put it in the fridge after it's had a chance to sit for a couple of hours? Also, what's the best way to reheat brisket? Would you guys recommend slicing it up tonight or waiting until tomorrow?

Lakeside Smoker
04-29-2007, 06:33 AM
Well, I'm now fifteen hours in and I'm at 188*.

15 hrs for a 5.6 lbs flat sounds like a long time. Your smoker temp might be way too low or your temp probe could be off.
Slice it up and lets see some pics!
Great thread BTW.

Mike

vr6Cop
04-29-2007, 09:34 AM
Great thread. I've learned a lot about briskets, so thanks to Steez for asking.

You guys are making me want to try my hand at brisket again, since the last one wasn't all that great.

So where are the pix, Steez? We want results!

Oldbob
04-29-2007, 10:16 AM
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r174/bob_indy/worthless_thread_without_pics.gif

:biggrin: :biggrin: :biggrin: :eek:

Mooner
04-29-2007, 10:55 AM
15 hrs for a 5.6 lbs flat sounds like a long time. Your smoker temp might be way too low or your temp probe could be off.
Slice it up and lets see some pics!
Great thread BTW.

Mike


I really agree. Wow, that thing should have been done in like 7-8 hours, even at 225. I really hope it turned out good Steeb. Remember everytime you open the lid you add 15 minutes of cooking time.

thirdeye
04-29-2007, 11:23 AM
I really agree. Wow, that thing should have been done in like 7-8 hours, even at 225. I really hope it turned out good Steeb. Remember everytime you open the lid you add 15 minutes of cooking time.

I'm in Vega$ for the weekend and it was lapping at 100* yesterday. So if his pit is a sunny spot in his yard, Steeb may have gotten away with a few more peeks than I can back home. :mrgreen:

sterlingsmoker
04-29-2007, 06:38 PM
WE WANT PICS,WE WANT PICS, WE WANT PICS!!!:icon_sleepy

sterlingsmoker
04-29-2007, 08:04 PM
Here is one until ya posthttp://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i299/TER_bucket/PictureorVideo619.jpg

Mooner
04-29-2007, 08:06 PM
Whoohooo!!! Thats what we wanted!! lol

Steeb
04-29-2007, 10:27 PM
Okay, I finally had a chance to get the pics uploaded. I used imagevenue so if you click on the pic, it will take you to a full size version. Sorry about the blurriness of some of the pics. I have to be the worst picture-taker ever.

http://img153.imagevenue.com/loc584/th_03626_First_Brisket_001_122_584lo.jpg (http://img153.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03626_First_Brisket_001_122_584lo.jp g)http://img168.imagevenue.com/loc348/th_03633_First_Brisket_015_122_348lo.jpg (http://img168.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03633_First_Brisket_015_122_348lo.jp g)http://img153.imagevenue.com/loc568/th_03635_First_Brisket_017_122_568lo.jpg (http://img153.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03635_First_Brisket_017_122_568lo.jp g)http://img178.imagevenue.com/loc367/th_03642_First_Brisket_018_122_367lo.jpg (http://img178.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03642_First_Brisket_018_122_367lo.jp g)
http://img128.imagevenue.com/loc523/th_03645_First_Brisket_019_122_523lo.jpg (http://img128.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03645_First_Brisket_019_122_523lo.jp g)http://img154.imagevenue.com/loc949/th_03646_First_Brisket_020_122_949lo.jpg (http://img154.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=03646_First_Brisket_020_122_949lo.jp g)


It turned out pretty good, I guess - my dad seemed to like it when I took him a plate earlier today. It could definitely be better, but it was pretty tasty. I was afraid it would be leather by the time it was done, but it was surprisingly juicy. It took way longer than it should have, but at least I learned a lot from all of my screwups yesterday. Hopefully the next one will go a lot smoother. Thanks to everyone's advice and tips. I'll definitely have to play around with the seasonings and types of wood next time.

wnkt
04-30-2007, 09:26 AM
The last time I saw a brisket thread with this much good information was.... was...was, well it I'm sure it was right here. I think all you brisketeers have covered about everything from seasoning that chunk of chest until it goes into the cooler. ............



I agree.....Roadmap Material!

Puppyboy
04-30-2007, 03:32 PM
When cooking cap up, has anyone else thought of removing the cap, rubbing the meat, and replacing the cap? I have been thinking about it for a while but just have not yet done it.

Mooner
04-30-2007, 03:40 PM
When cooking cap up, has anyone else thought of removing the cap, rubbing the meat, and replacing the cap? I have been thinking about it for a while but just have not yet done it.

Shoot, if you can get it off in one piece id say that would work like a charm.