PDA

View Full Version : Rub Test


Homer98
08-28-2018, 11:55 AM
Hi all, I am new to the forum and I am excited to share notes and learn from everyone. I have been wanting to test out a bunch of different rubs for my ribs. The only problem is that (as you know) ribs take time and are kind of expensive for me to try out multiple different rubs in one smoke. Plus I can never remember from one smoke to the next one what I like the best…even when I take notes. I was curious if anyone had any suggestions on any other type of meat that I could try different rib rubs on that would help me try different rubs. My thought was to buy a bunch of pork steaks to try it out.

GVDub
08-28-2018, 12:22 PM
I'd say you should still take the time, since flavors develop differently in a long vs. a short cook, but pick up either some "country-style" ribs or a pack of ½–¾" pork chops to experiment on, for a less pricey platform than full rib slabs.

dadsr4
08-28-2018, 01:11 PM
Shoulder cut country style ribs are a good choice. Flavor similar to spareribs, and cook time is long enough for the flavors to develop, with enough meat on each of them to get a good idea of the seasoning flavor with the meat.

Joe Black
08-28-2018, 02:07 PM
Try cutting a rack of ribs into 2 or 3 pieces and you will have ribs at a good practice cost. Start with kosher salt and cracked black pepper. Then begin to add other spices to fill out the rub until you get to where you are satisfied.

Add spices in very small amounts, not all at one time and keep accurate notes. Try: chili powder, garlic powder, onion powder, and a bunch of others.

TealStBBQKing
08-28-2018, 04:41 PM
Try grilling some pork chops I bet that would be pretty close and give you an idea on the cheap

IamMadMan
08-28-2018, 04:51 PM
Justin,


I agree with the above, buy Country Style Ribs and cut them in half.


Interestingly enough, for those who do not know: country-style ribs, don't actually come from the ribs. Thus creating a confusing product name not understood by many. The name is taken from the fact that the meat borders the rib area and has a texture and flavor similar to the meat around the ribs, but this theory of how they were given the name was taken from an article I read a many years ago.

Country Style Ribs are cut from the blade end, just above or behind where the whole shoulder was taken off. Boneless Country Style Ribs can also be strips cut from thick pork shoulder steaks. This somewhat fatty economical cut is sold either bone-in or as boneless products. The meatiest variety of Country Style Ribs are cut from the sirloin or rib end of the pork loin and are usually labeled as "Pork Loin Country Style Ribs".

Also, Country Style Ribs are a great way to test multiple samples of rubs or sauces without the great expense of multiple racks of ribs. They cook in the same manner as ribs, they are very similar in texture and flavor as ribs, thus giving you an inexpensive platform to experiment with.


.

Homer98
08-29-2018, 09:08 AM
Thanks for all the suggestions. I know what I am cooking this weekend!

Right on Q
08-29-2018, 12:21 PM
We cooked pork chops often for a few years to test different rub and sauce combos. The wife loved having me cook when I got home and she enjoyed trying all the different flavors

dadsr4
08-29-2018, 12:37 PM
We cooked pork chops often for a few years to test different rub and sauce combos. The wife loved having me cook when I got home and she enjoyed trying all the different flavors
If you cook loinbacks, pork chops would be a good choice, as they are sliced from the loin and are blander like loinbacks.