PDA

View Full Version : Do you separate your brisket?


TXNewbie
08-23-2018, 04:57 PM
Wifey and I love the burnt ends and the point part of the brisket the best.

Do you guys separate your point and flat prior to putting it on the smoker?

medic92
08-23-2018, 05:12 PM
I don't. I separate them when I'm slicing it after cooking but not before

hurricanedavid
08-23-2018, 07:02 PM
No, not completely separated but I do trim out most of the huge fat layer between the two muscles. This results in a lot less work on the back side.

EyeBurnEverything
08-23-2018, 07:08 PM
I seperate the flat and point and only make burnt ends. The flat goes in the grinder for hamburger.

TXNewbie
08-23-2018, 07:34 PM
I'm thinking if I do separate than that will will give me more bark on the entire point. Am I mistaken?

hurricanedavid
08-23-2018, 07:46 PM
Upon separation of muscles after the long smoke I cube and season the point pieces and smoke them for another hour. At that point the “cubes” crust up and then I finish with sause in the smoker for another 0.5 hours. My aim is not to have a heavy bark on the burnt ends but rather a light crust with carmalized sause.:thumb:

EyeBurnEverything
08-23-2018, 08:31 PM
I'm thinking if I do separate than that will will give me more bark on the entire point. Am I mistaken?

more surface area, more room for bark. Make sure you trim the fat very thin if not completely. You wont get bark on a thick fat cap. It might look dark like bark but it wont be bark.

TXNewbie
08-23-2018, 08:34 PM
more surface area, more room for bark. Make sure you trim the fat very thin if not completely. You wont get bark on a thick fat cap. It might look dark like bark but it wont be bark.

Thanks. That's what I was thinking of doing. I bought a nice Prime brisket today from Costco and am planning to try it out this weekend after my smoker gets delivered tomorrow and I season it.

I have watched like 20 video's on You Tube on this subject. I would want to do a fairly aggressive trim on it. I wasn't sure if having the flat over the top of the point would keep it from forming the bark I love so much.

mikemci
08-23-2018, 08:43 PM
Never.

jasonjax
08-23-2018, 08:50 PM
Sure do.

TXNewbie
08-23-2018, 09:01 PM
Sure do.

Does it work out well for you?

EyeBurnEverything
08-23-2018, 11:19 PM
Thanks. That's what I was thinking of doing. I bought a nice Prime brisket today from Costco and am planning to try it out this weekend after my smoker gets delivered tomorrow and I season it.

I have watched like 20 video's on You Tube on this subject. I would want to do a fairly aggressive trim on it. I wasn't sure if having the flat over the top of the point would keep it from forming the bark I love so much.

Take a bunch of aluminum foil and make a ball the size of a baseball and put the brisket over top of it so the center is at a higher point. This will prevent puddles of juices/fat on the surface. If you have puddles on the surface, you will not form bark in those areas.

You can also take a cheap cooling rack and bend it into a triangle shape and lay the brisket over top of it, this will achieve the same affect. This also works good if you have a very large brisket and use a small vertical smoker as it will fit better.

jasonjax
08-23-2018, 11:35 PM
Does it work out well for you?

Yes.

I separate the flat and point and trim the point of all fat cap to produce as much bark as possible during the initial cook because I always make burnt ends when I make brisket.

Springram
08-23-2018, 11:53 PM
As an ignorant getting older Texas boy..what are burnt ends? :icon_smile_tongue:

EyeBurnEverything
08-24-2018, 12:00 AM
As an ignorant getting older Texas boy..what are burnt ends? :icon_smile_tongue:

Chunks of brisket point with a heavy bark on at least 2-3 sides of the chunk. I personally don't sauce, i believe in using a dry rub with sugar added to get that candied affect.

Of course, if you prep it right, you can achieve the same results with the flat or even a chuck roast.

Springram
08-24-2018, 12:36 AM
Chunks of brisket point with a heavy bark on at least 2-3 sides of the chunk. I personally don't sauce, i believe in using a dry rub with sugar added to get that candied affect.

Of course, if you prep it right, you can achieve the same results with the flat or even a chuck roast.

Thanks. You are a true Brethren. Actually, I was sorta pulling a few legs here. It is just that we really normally slice the point in Texas. We call it "moist" and the flat is often referred to as "lean".

Rockinar
08-24-2018, 03:06 AM
No. No picante sauce from New York City and no slicing off the point.

Mikhail
08-24-2018, 07:20 AM
I did the last time I did a brisket and it turned out quite well. Since I have a small cooker I will probably do it again next time. It gets more smoke in and more bark.

nachos4life
08-24-2018, 07:50 AM
i do not separate prior to cooking but usually do after cooking. However, we've found that our supplier has cases of points for sale. burnt ends for days!

frognot
08-24-2018, 08:30 AM
Will separate if the brisket is too long to fit well on my BGE. Gonna do some burnt ends (a rarity for me) this weekend so will separate after reading y'all's comments.

sliding_billy
08-24-2018, 08:42 AM
I prefer not to separate since I think the area of overlap is where the best slices come from allowing a nice mix of fatty and lean in one bite. That overlap also gives the point a chance to help moisten the flat while cooking.

TXNewbie
08-24-2018, 08:49 AM
I prefer not to separate since I think the area of overlap is where the best slices come from allowing a nice mix of fatty and lean in one bite. That overlap also gives the point a chance to help moisten the flat while cooking.

That's what I'm wondering about - how having the meat overlap like that affects both sides.

Pedro7
08-24-2018, 09:00 AM
I prefer not to separate since I think the area of overlap is where the best slices come from allowing a nice mix of fatty and lean in one bite. That overlap also gives the point a chance to help moisten the flat while cooking.

My thought as well. I love those "middle" slices. I never separate, but trim just about all the deckle fat out. Lots of smoke, lots of bark, lots of flavor.

TheBBQJew
08-24-2018, 04:35 PM
As an ignorant getting older Texas boy..what are burnt ends? :icon_smile_tongue:

Burnt ends historically are the well done parts of the brisket point after cooking a full brisket low and slow. The burnt ends have a robust crusty outer bark contrasting the soft fatty rendered meat underneath.

Recently burnt ends have taken on a life independent of the brisket as an entity. Sometimes the brisket point is separated from the flat and cooked separately. The point being cooked specifically for burnt ends using different methods from cooking the flat. Burnt end recipes further the development of a crusty bark by coating with bbq sauce and carmelizing the sugars in the pit right before serving.

Good burnt ends cook right here...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FVOh8430oCs&list=FLSnssUvIloYYGpLQVNY8Bxw&index=10&t=11s

Springram
08-24-2018, 05:33 PM
Burnt ends historically are the well done parts of the brisket point after cooking a full brisket low and slow. The burnt ends have a robust crusty outer bark contrasting the soft fatty rendered meat underneath.

Recently burnt ends have taken on a life independent of the brisket as an entity. Sometimes the brisket point is separated from the flat and cooked separately. The point being cooked specifically for burnt ends using different methods from cooking the flat. Burnt end recipes further the development of a crusty bark by coating with bbq sauce and carmelizing the sugars in the pit right before serving.

Good burnt ends cook right here...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FVOh8430oCs&list=FLSnssUvIloYYGpLQVNY8Bxw&index=10&t=11s

Thanks. I really mean it. But I am through with my obviously failed humor in attempt to point out regional differences in how brisket points are used in cooking.

TXNewbie
08-24-2018, 05:39 PM
Thanks. I really mean it. But I am through with my obviously failed humor in attempt to point out regional differences in how brisket points are used in cooking.

I know everyone was trying to be super helpful. But I don't think people outside Texas understand just how much of a staple burnt ends are here in Texas. They even have their own place and different price on many menu's here from regular brisket.

Besides, as a Texan if you really didn't know what burnt ends were (I knew you did), the Texas BBQ Police would force you out of the state and drop you off in either Louisiana or Oklahoma. ;)

TheBBQJew
08-24-2018, 05:51 PM
:biggrin1:

CptKaos
08-24-2018, 06:11 PM
I think burnt ends are actually a foreign thing. Meat for people that don’t really like brisket:)

Larry

EyeBurnEverything
08-24-2018, 06:30 PM
I think burnt ends are actually a foreign thing. Meat for people that don’t really like brisket:)

Larry

By that logic, if its not sliced, its not brisket. I guess if it falls apart its just shredded beef. I personally prefer chopped beef over sliced brisket.

Rockinar
08-24-2018, 06:38 PM
I know everyone was trying to be super helpful. But I don't think people outside Texas understand just how much of a staple burnt ends are here in Texas. They even have their own place and different price on many menu's here from regular brisket.

Besides, as a Texan if you really didn't know what burnt ends were (I knew you did), the Texas BBQ Police would force you out of the state and drop you off in either Louisiana or Oklahoma. ;)


Burns ends are a Kansas City thing. Not a Texas thing. Nobody in Texas cares about burnt ends. They are a sort of novelty menu item.

TXNewbie
08-24-2018, 06:47 PM
Burns ends are a Kansas City thing. Not a Texas thing. Nobody in Texas cares about burnt ends. They are a sort of novelty menu item.

Huh. I've been to many of the top Texas Monthly Top 50 BBQ places and many of them have burnt ends actually listed on the menu as a completely separate item and at a higher price.

My understating is Texas burnt ends and KC burnt ends are served very differently. I personally prefer the Texas style, though the KC is still good also. Just different.

Springram
08-24-2018, 06:52 PM
Gawd... what have I started? Just a bit of fun regarding "burnt ends". I really do not give a rat's azz about burnt ends, never have. As to them being a staple in Texas...... please tell me you are kidding.

I have cooked burnt ends and they turned out pretty good. It is just not why I spend long hours putting in sticks in my firebox. Nor will you find it in places like Lockhart, Lulling, Taylor or Lexington. People stand in line for hours at Franklin's and they get up to the counter and order "burnt ends".... really? Maybe the Austin, Texas located on Mars... :grin:

Like I mentioned before, burnt ends are fine... go get 'em. They are just not that common here.

jasonjax
08-24-2018, 09:54 PM
Burnt ends are probably my favorite form of BBQ.... don't really care where they are or aren't a staple since it is my personal preference. Thus I aim to make some good burnt ends each and every time I cook a brisket. It also separates (giggiddi giddiddi) the men from the boys making the perfect brisket when it comes to BBQ competitions.

TXNewbie
08-24-2018, 10:00 PM
Burnt ends are probably my favorite form of BBQ.... don't really care where they are or aren't a staple since it is my personal preference. Thus I aim to make some good burnt ends each and every time I cook a brisket. It also separates (giggiddi giddiddi) the men from the boys making the perfect brisket when it comes to BBQ competitions.

Wifey and I LOVE good burnt ends. Thus my starting this thread. Do you separate the two parts when making brisket? How do you ensure great burnt ends?

Bob C Cue
08-24-2018, 10:09 PM
Regarding burnt ends perhaps this will help.

OklaDustDevil
08-25-2018, 03:13 AM
I’ve never separated before smoking. But after the brisket is done, it helps to separate them because the grain runs in different directions in the point versus flat, so separating helps to slice properly. As someone pointed out earlier, the sliced flat becomes the
“lean” and the sliced point becomes the “moist.”

Then if you want to use a hunk of the point for burnt ends instead of slicing it all, you throw it back in the smoker for 2-3 more hours. Because of the extra smoking time, I’ve never felt the need to separate at the beginning to get good burnt ends from the point.

jasonjax
08-25-2018, 08:09 AM
Wifey and I LOVE good burnt ends. Thus my starting this thread. Do you separate the two parts when making brisket? How do you ensure great burnt ends?

I separate the two muscles. I also remove all of the fat cap from the point so rub will adhere and form more bark during the initial cook. I lay the flat back over the point when cooking.

When the flat reaches proper temp/tenderness I remove it from the smoker, wrap and rest in the Cambro. Meanwhile, I let the point rest a bit, slice into cubes, dust, sauce, back into smoker in a pan foiled for an hour or so, remove the foil, mix the ends up with all the goodness and cook another hour or so for the bark to firm up.

TXNewbie
08-25-2018, 05:25 PM
I’ve never separated before smoking. But after the brisket is done, it helps to separate them because the grain runs in different directions in the point versus flat, so separating helps to slice properly. As someone pointed out earlier, the sliced flat becomes the
“lean” and the sliced point becomes the “moist.”

Then if you want to use a hunk of the point for burnt ends instead of slicing it all, you throw it back in the smoker for 2-3 more hours. Because of the extra smoking time, I’ve never felt the need to separate at the beginning to get good burnt ends from the point.

Great - thank you!

mrpigs
08-25-2018, 06:56 PM
I know everyone was trying to be super helpful. But I don't think people outside Texas understand just how much of a staple burnt ends are here in Texas. They even have their own place and different price on many menu's here from regular brisket.

Besides, as a Texan if you really didn't know what burnt ends were (I knew you did), the Texas BBQ Police would force you out of the state and drop you off in either Louisiana or Oklahoma. ;)

I hate when that happens