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DavidJ
06-07-2018, 10:08 PM
Hello Brethren,

Better late than never I guess...

I started trimming and getting the fire stated early morning and had the butts on by 8:00ish. This was my 1st butt in more than a year, so I'm kinda rusty. I was able to do a fairly decent job of controlling the temps in my UDS, but there were several times when it either spiked or sank, but I was generally able to stay around 220.

One was injected with a mixture of apple cider and Cholula hot sauce, and the other wasn't. Each of the two butts had a different rub. Out of the two, the injected one was much better!

I've never wrapped with butcher paper, so I tried wrapping them for 60 - 90 minutes, but I didn't like how I lost the crispy bark, so I unwrapped and put them back on.

I tried the pull test on the bone, and it wasn't loose, but I panicked because I didn't want to overcook it, so I pulled at an internal temp of 165. Unfortunately I didn't get the nice pulled pork I wanted :-( but the slices are mostly good!

Any refresher tips are appreciated!

David

ShadowDriver
06-07-2018, 10:32 PM
I've been in your shoes.

I highly suggest that you continue the cook up to 195-205... and stick by the bone wiggle test.

Wrap only when you decide that you like the color and fear that it might go "over dark" on you. I generally don't wrap butts unless I "pan" them in a 1/2 pan with foil over top to help keep the juices. Granted, this typically often happens near the 160F mark... that's a general "decision point" for me.

I think you discovered that you didn't quite cook the butt to the point that the bone would wiggle or pull.

Don't be afraid to really kick the temp up on a butt or two. 275... 325... it's completely fine. Just make sure that smoke is clean.

Just my 2.5 cents on the matter. Give it another go. I've been there, mate.

If this doesn't make sense or is confusing, please ask questions.

pjtexas1
06-07-2018, 11:07 PM
Butts can take really high temps. I like the bark I get at 325-350. You'll get the next one. Patience is the key.

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Stlsportster
06-07-2018, 11:16 PM
Everything above and a general reminder that we all agree it’s done when it’s done. The bone wiggle and probe tender....some butts take less or more time. And again 200 is a closer temp for pulled. 165 is great for slices as you learned.

IamMadMan
06-08-2018, 06:23 AM
Everything above and a general reminder that we all agree its done when its done. The bone wiggle and probe tender....some butts take less or more time. And again 200 is a closer temp for pulled. 165 is great for slices as you learned.


^ +1 I agree...


Connective tissue collagen begins to dissolve into a gelatinous state at 160, the melting of collagen starts to accelerate rapidly at or about 180



The only thing I'd like to add is to not wait for the bone to fall out. I found my best pulled pork is when you firmly grasp and twist/pull on the bone and it wiggles like a loose tooth, then it is done.


Also, the hold after the cook is also an integral part of the final stages of the cook, helping to convert the remaining connective tissue into collagen. When removed from the cooker let it cool for a few minutes then wrap it in foil, then wrap the foiled butt in a towel, and let it rest in an insulated cooler. A rest of 2 to 4 hours will insure the connective tissue is converted into tender, juicy strands of meat. Always plan on the rest when calculating cooking times.

DavidJ
06-08-2018, 05:56 PM
Thanks all,

I know I'm not a very active member here, but this is hands down, the best internet community there is! I always enjoy reading others posts, and know I'll always get good feedback when I need it.

Thanks again

David

tmv1976
06-08-2018, 08:12 PM
Shadowdriver pretty summed it all up.

BillN
06-08-2018, 08:15 PM
As already said above patience will be rewarded.

Cook
06-08-2018, 08:49 PM
For future reference, at your cook temp of around 220*, you likely would have had 4-6 more hours to reach the proper time for pulling.

Hoss
06-08-2018, 09:25 PM
^ +1 I agree...


Connective tissue collagen begins to dissolve into a gelatinous state at 160, the melting of collagen starts to accelerate rapidly at or about 180



The only thing I'd like to add is to not wait for the bone to fall out. I found my best pulled pork is when you firmly grasp and twist/pull on the bone and it wiggles like a loose tooth, then it is done.


Also, the hold after the cook is also an integral part of the final stages of the cook, helping to convert the remaining connective tissue into collagen. When removed from the cooker let it cool for a few minutes then wrap it in foil, then wrap the foiled butt in a towel, and let it rest in an insulated cooler. A rest of 2 to 4 hours will insure the connective tissue is converted into tender, juicy strands of meat. Always plan on the rest when calculating cooking times.


I must concur.I can certainly tell a difference in quality of rested vs not rested.Rested wins EVERY time.

medic92
06-09-2018, 08:20 AM
You definitely want to get the temp closer to 200F for pulled pork. If you're a little short on time, cut each butt into four pieces and they'll cook faster. It will also add more surface area for bark formation.

JEStucker
06-09-2018, 10:01 AM
I've definitely got to get more patient... I have a hard time with resting my meat... though I can usually manage 90 minutes give or take... but I always just want my food!!!