PDA

View Full Version : What makes the best slather?


EyeBurnEverything
06-05-2018, 10:29 PM
I have been a long time lurker and have read everything from yellow mustard, oil, Molasses, Ketchup, even A1, and Mayo. I am sure i am missing a lot. I am curious which of these slathers (binder) affects flavor and color the least, and also the most.

Thank you for reading, and thank you even more for responding.

ShadowDriver
06-05-2018, 10:32 PM
What (meat) are you slathering?

I've used this and that, but it all "depends." :mmph:

BruceB
06-05-2018, 10:34 PM
I've only used mustard and Worsty Sauce as a slather in the past. And neither left any trace of flavor or related color.

I don't use any slather now. I will rub my protein about 1 hour before going on the cooker and allow it to form a paste as it reacts with the meat, then reapply a light coating of rub before going on the cooker.

SmittyJonz
06-05-2018, 10:35 PM
Tbs......

EyeBurnEverything
06-05-2018, 10:42 PM
What (meat) are you slathering?

I've used this and that, but it all "depends." :mmph:

Lets to stick to beef and pork. That brings up a good question...Which slathers are universal?

Czarbecue
06-05-2018, 10:45 PM
I find thicker slathers like mustard and mayo to be very prone to shed rub because of the texture. So I reserve it for ribs where I can do the bone side first and then apply rub on the top when I have it on the smoker. The resulting bark is usually more clumpy, like the skin on KFC original recipe.

Thinner slathers like worchestershire and oil I use for brisket or any meat that requires more handling.

But overall, some may not detect the added flavors, but it will depend on your rub and if it overpowers it.

EyeBurnEverything
06-05-2018, 10:52 PM
I find thicker slathers like mustard and mayo to be very prone to shed rub because of the texture. So I reserve it for ribs where I can do the bone side first and then apply rub on the top when I have it on the smoker. The resulting bark is usually more clumpy, like the skin on KFC original recipe.

Thinner slathers like worchestershire and oil I use for brisket or any meat that requires more handling.

But overall, some may not detect the added flavors, but it will depend on your rub and if it overpowers it.

Another good point. What slather works best to adhere the rub onto the meat without falling off? I would have thunk a thicker slather like yellow mustard would work better then oil.

Czarbecue
06-05-2018, 11:01 PM
Another good point. What slather works best to adhere the rub onto the meat without falling off? I would have thunk a thicker slather like yellow mustard would work better then oil.


Mustard certainly works better with the rub since it can collect more on the surface. But you'll also end up with more of it on your gloves than on your meat during the handling process. I can write things with the thicker slathers.... yet oil/worchestshire doesn't stick to the gloves as much. It seems impartial to which side it goes on.

EyeBurnEverything
06-05-2018, 11:06 PM
Mustard certainly works better with the rub since it can collect more on the surface. But you'll also end up with more of it on your gloves than on your meat during the handling process. I can write things with the thicker slathers.... yet oil/worchestshire doesn't stick to the gloves as much. It seems impartial to which side it goes on.

What is your opinion on which slather helps the rub set (bark) to the point that you can not even rub it off (pun intended)?

Smoke on Badger Mountain
06-05-2018, 11:09 PM
I have never ever had a bad cook using either EVOO (my standard) or mayo.

EyeBurnEverything
06-05-2018, 11:15 PM
I have never ever had a bad cook using either EVOO (my standard) or mayo.

I have used Mayo on turkey's for thanksgiving. It worked really well for browning and crisping up the skin. I have never tried it as a slather for rub on other meats.

How about a yellow mustard/mayo mixture as a slather? Best of both worlds?

ssv3
06-06-2018, 12:00 AM
What (meat) are you slathering?

I've used this and that, but it all "depends." :mmph:

I've only used mustard and Worsty Sauce as a slather in the past. And neither left any trace of flavor or related color.

I don't use any slather now. I will rub my protein about 1 hour before going on the cooker and allow it to form a paste as it reacts with the meat, then reapply a light coating of rub before going on the cooker.

What the guys said^^^^

I use

Pork: Mustard

Chicken: Mayo

Beef and lamb: Worcestershire

Fish or just an all around slather for me is high burning point oils like grape seed, sunflower, safflower, avocado etc.

EyeBurnEverything
06-06-2018, 12:11 AM
I've only used mustard and Worsty Sauce as a slather in the past. And neither left any trace of flavor or related color.

I don't use any slather now. I will rub my protein about 1 hour before going on the cooker and allow it to form a paste as it reacts with the meat, then reapply a light coating of rub before going on the cooker.

I used to do this, and it worked great for flavor and the rub really setting. But i spoke to a few local pitmasters that made some really good Q, and they told me they start off completely naked and cold, and after the meat reaches ambient temp they slather and rub. They never got into detail on the slather, nor the rub, but their Q looked, smelled, and tasted Amazing.

ssv3
06-06-2018, 12:47 AM
I used to do this, and it worked great for flavor and the rub really setting. But i spoke to a few local pitmasters that made some really good Q, and they told me they start off completely naked and cold, and after the meat reaches ambient temp they slather and rub. They never got into detail on the slather, nor the rub, but their Q looked, smelled, and tasted Amazing.

I'll tell you one thing, no one is going to give you their secrets. It's all in the hints and the rest is up to you to ponder and figure out. :thumb: At the end of the day it's you putting two and two together. Gotta say though, us brethren are pretty generous in giving out details.

frognot
06-06-2018, 01:16 AM
Mustard thinned with pickle juice.

Leftwngr
06-06-2018, 01:36 AM
EVOO is the default
Mayo when I feel like a change

I just think of it as a binder, so whatever works and leaves nothing weird behind

TravelingJ
06-06-2018, 02:23 AM
Gotta say though, us brethren are pretty generous in giving out details.

That's an understatement. I don't think I'd have lasted a week with my smoker, if it wasn't for the people on here. So many good ideas, and details, and inspirations.

I haven't done a lot of slathers, but one that I think I saw cowgirl mention, was bacon grease. I've used that on pork shoulder a time or two-and they turned out great.

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 02:32 AM
I've Never used a slather and Never had an issue with Rub Not sticking........

pjtexas1
06-06-2018, 06:08 AM
Mustard thinned with pickle juice.I was waiting to see Franklin's! Whatever you use don't over do it. Doesn't take much. I'm with sako on using ones with a higher temp. I've been using grape seed oil for the last few years on everything.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

Burnt at Both Endz
06-06-2018, 06:21 AM
I've Never used a slather and Never had an issue with Rub Not sticking........

Same here, unless it has to go on the pit frozen, then a little yellow mustard works.

ModelMaker
06-06-2018, 07:23 AM
Butter flavored Pam.
Ed

smoke ninja
06-06-2018, 07:29 AM
I've Never used a slather and Never had an issue with Rub Not sticking........

I never bought the binder idea. I view slathers as a moisturizer to help rehydrate the rub.

LordRiffenstein
06-06-2018, 07:55 AM
I have tried a few different things but have gone to olive oil as default. It's easy and it isn't messy.

Stlsportster
06-06-2018, 07:59 AM
You want to know what I rub on my meat?

:shock:

EVOO on beef and chicken with skin. Nothing on pork. Skinless chicken I brine. Nothing on Fish.

m-fine
06-06-2018, 08:05 AM
I usually pat the meat dry and then rub dry with only the moisture the rub pulls from he meat as a binder. Early in the cook after the bark starts to set I may apply a thin slather/baste that is oil or mayo based, depending on the meat and the goals for end results.

HOBONICHOLBBQ
06-06-2018, 08:21 AM
I did this test awhile back. End of the day, they were all pretty equal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EfWhnJ2d90&t=3s

Bob C Cue
06-06-2018, 10:42 AM
I did this test awhile back. End of the day, they were all pretty equal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EfWhnJ2d90&t=3s

I love the smell of subterfuge in the morning!

EyeBurnEverything
06-06-2018, 11:14 AM
I did this test awhile back. End of the day, they were all pretty equal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EfWhnJ2d90&t=3s

Thanks for doing that. From your tests in my opinion the slather didn't look like it made any difference on the bark, but it does look like mayo and mustard hindered the smoke ring more so then plain and just oil.

smoke ninja
06-06-2018, 11:40 AM
Some nonscientific slather experiments

Chicken

https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=222075

Ribs

https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=224263

HOBONICHOLBBQ
06-06-2018, 12:01 PM
I love the smell of subterfuge in the morning!

I don't quite follow. May be because of too many syllables lol.

Thanks for doing that. From your tests in my opinion the slather didn't look like it made any difference on the bark, but it does look like mayo and mustard hindered the smoke ring more so then plain and just oil.

That's basically my conclusion. Funny thing was a lot of people asked about taste. There wasn't much a noticeable difference but I don't have the most discerning palate.

ssv3
06-06-2018, 12:11 PM
I never bought the binder idea. I view slathers as a moisturizer to help rehydrate the rub.

This!

:thumb:

andre2955
06-06-2018, 12:27 PM
I've Never used a slather and Never had an issue with Rub Not sticking........

+1 more with this ^^^^

Reason being that is seems to me the slather would create a barrier for rub to actually contact meat but hey... who knows. The thinned mustard with pickle juice sounds like an interesting thing to try.

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 12:34 PM
I don’t see slather Helping anything plus it’s another step and more costs - much like spritzing or meat temp probes (that stay in during cook).

I like to keep it simple - light trim , rub, Smoke n Heat, possibly wrap in Butcher paper but usually not, Rest, Slice, Eat.

Eric In STL
06-06-2018, 03:50 PM
hey Smittyjonz, u never spritz either, and your meat doesn't dry out?

cowgirl
06-06-2018, 04:00 PM
I like to use bacon drippings as a slather.

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 04:02 PM
Nah, running Hot n Fast the edges of a Brisket can Char but wrapping in Butcher Paper Helps prevent that - although I usually just run Nekid and just cut edges off when slicing.

Eric In STL
06-06-2018, 04:05 PM
Smitty, out of all your smokers, which do u like best and why?

smoke ninja
06-06-2018, 04:08 PM
Nah, running Hot n Fast the edges of a Brisket can Char but wrapping in Butcher Paper Helps prevent that - although I usually just run Nekid and just cut edges off when slicing.

So we pound our chest about how there's no need to wrap or spritz but then admit to trashing the edges?

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 04:12 PM
I like them All. BoomShuckaLucka and LadyKickAzz ( Old Country Smokehouse) are basically the Same - cook the Same more or Less. Then I have the DIY insulated cabinet for charcoal cooks and recently got the Old Country Gravity Feed Charcoal Smoker - Fantasia.
I like Fantasia better than the DIY cabinet mostly because it’s Bigger.
I’ll Always have atleast 1 stickburner AND 1 Charcoal Smoker.

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 04:16 PM
So we pound our chest about how there's no need to wrap or spritz but then admit to trashing the edges?

Wasn’t no chest pounding - simply stated I see no benefit in Slather or Spritzing........I DID say wrapping in Butcher paper Helps (esp when cooking Hot n Fast) but I Usually don’t - just cuz I’m too Lazy..........

I run Ribs Nekid with just a Buttload of Rub- No Slather, no Wrapping, no Spritzing .
I Run Brisket n Butts Nekid with a Buttload of Rub - No slather , no Spritzing but should wrap in Butcher paper when Color is Right and Bark is Set to prevent Hard Edges - But usually Don’t........

jasonjax
06-06-2018, 04:34 PM
I use different stuff for shiz and grins.

I was impressed with my A1 and beef base test on my last briskie.

Eric In STL
06-06-2018, 05:17 PM
SmittyJonz, how is the smoke flavor on that gravity feed, light, medium, or can u get heavy smoke?

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 05:27 PM
I add chunks to the Chute with the charcoal and put the Bigger chunks in the Firebox so I get Plent of Smoke Flavor.......

Bob C Cue
06-06-2018, 07:30 PM
I don't quite follow. May be because of too many syllables lol.




With Sako's suggestion that no one is going to give you their secrets, I just assumed your test was doctored a bit to hide the fact that mayo (as everyone should know!) is the world's best slather bar none!

Smoking Piney
06-06-2018, 07:42 PM
OP, you may as well ask "what's the best color?" :-P

sthamm
06-06-2018, 07:43 PM
I'm a fan of mayo as a slather. I'll concede it does seem to shed rub a fair bit more, but the upside is resistance to charring....and potentially creating a thicker barrier retarding moisture loss? I like to envision the mayo acting like sunscreen in preventing a sunburn. Thicker suncreen (mayo > oil > water) usually works better in this regard. All conjecture and anecdotal of course...

Study limitation: When a brisket "sweats," it's sweating water moisture and rendered fat. When a person sweats, it's just water moisture.

EyeBurnEverything
06-06-2018, 07:46 PM
OP, you may as well ask "what's the best color?" :-P

Midnight is my fav, but i must be color blind, because most people call that color burnt.

dadsr4
06-06-2018, 07:56 PM
The moisture from the meat works just fine for me.

HOBONICHOLBBQ
06-06-2018, 08:48 PM
With Sako's suggestion that no one is going to give you their secrets, I just assumed your test was doctored a bit to hide the fact that mayo (as everyone should know!) is the world's best slather bar none!


Gotcha, I'm not in business and don't comp cook. I just want to learn as much as I can and experiment as much as I can. I may be wrong sometimes, but it's not because I am being dishonest............possibly misinformed though lol. I fed a lot of neighbors from that video and honestly the best parts were, I learned something for me, and I made a bunch of people have a smile on their face when I showed up with boxes of pork.

Bob C Cue
06-06-2018, 08:50 PM
Gotcha, I'm not in business and don't comp cook. I just want to learn as much as I can and experiment as much as I can. I may be wrong sometimes, but it's not because I am being dishonest............possibly misinformed though lol. I fed a lot of neighbors from that video and honestly the best parts were, I learned something for me, and I made a bunch of people have a smile on their face when I showed up with boxes of pork.
Nice work on the video. Keep up the good work!

SmittyJonz
06-06-2018, 10:16 PM
I’m still wanting to see a Veggemite Slathered Brisket..........

EyeBurnEverything
06-06-2018, 10:19 PM
With Sako's suggestion that no one is going to give you their secrets, I just assumed your test was doctored a bit to hide the fact that mayo (as everyone should know!) is the world's best slather bar none!

I know you are joking with the Mayo comment. But from Hobo's tests, I have come to the conclusion that the best slather is "wet" anything to wet the meat just enough to get a dry rub to stick. Maybe some initial salt just to draw moisture out of the meat. It will also draw out emulsifying agents which will help bind the rub to the protein/meat.

ElQueTraz
06-07-2018, 07:01 PM
I add chunks to the Chute with the charcoal and put the Bigger chunks in the Firebox so I get Plent of Smoke Flavor.......

With you on that...

EyeBurnEverything
06-07-2018, 07:05 PM
Iím still wanting to see a Veggemite Slathered Brisket..........

That gives me an idea....Better then bullion beef base for obviously brisket and short ribs. Just slather it on as you would any paste.

Cook
06-07-2018, 07:19 PM
If I feel that my meat is too dry for seasoning to adhear (has it ever been, really?), then I add...get this...water.

smoke ninja
06-07-2018, 07:41 PM
If I feel that my meat is too dry for seasoning to adhear (has it ever been, really?), then I add...get this...water.

When I was reading APL's book he suggested if you are touching the meat you may as well take that time to add flavor. I will admit its hard to add much to brisket but not sauce in ribs works to add something.......now is it more than adding a dash of cayenne pepper to the rub? :noidea:

I get that it may be minimal benefit but if you add many layers of subtle flavor they can add up.

I also agree that a slather is never actually needed.

Cook
06-07-2018, 08:25 PM
While I agree that adding flavor at every level is paramount on many occasions, I'm a fan of somewhat minimalist barbecue (many times). I like to taste the meat without much going on besides the fact (many times). So while I see your point, I'm positive you see mine as well.

(I'm fairly sure I've seen Franklin spraying with water pre-season...I'm also fairly sure APL has never been recognized as having the best brisket in America)

In reality, APL is a chef & I get it. I'm in the food business...I get it. Seriously...I do.

jasonjax
06-08-2018, 07:10 AM
That gives me an idea....Better then bullion beef base for obviously brisket and short ribs. Just slather it on as you would any paste.

Done that many times with the idea being worst-case scenario I get some even beefier broth out of it.

EyeBurnEverything
06-08-2018, 11:49 AM
I didn't want to start a new thread and this is unrelated to slather, but im going to ask here anyway.
My local Ace Hardware started selling Plowboys Bovine Bold and while i never tried it, i heard people rave about it. Can someone that has used it tell me its flavor profile?
For example, Black Ops to me has strong hints of cumin and chili powder which i don't care for on smoked meats.
Whats the main flavors you taste with Bovine Bold?

ahawkeyeguy
06-08-2018, 12:25 PM
Yellow mustard on Pork, EVOO on Beef, Mayo on Poultry.

aawa
06-08-2018, 02:23 PM
I use a little bit of water to allow the rub to adhere to pork and beef.

For whole chickens I use a compound butter with the seasoning already in it and put it below and ontop of the skin. For chicken parts, I will use a little bit of avocado oil or olive oil to help crisp the skin up.

SmittyJonz
06-08-2018, 03:30 PM
Someone oughta try peanut butter......

Jason TQ
06-08-2018, 03:37 PM
Someone oughta try peanut butter......

........on it.

Danny B
06-08-2018, 05:54 PM
I was looking for this answer a while back and tried many discussed here. I don’t think I recall seeing anyone mentioning what I settled on which is peanut oil. It has a high smoke point, it’s thinner than olive oil, mustard, mayo etc but sticks better than worster, hot sauce, pickle juice etc. What ultimately convinced me I was on the right track was both Johnny Trigg and Chef Tim Love use it. I figured they both know what they are doing. Ultimately there’s no right or wrong, just your preference.

EyeBurnEverything
06-08-2018, 07:37 PM
Someone oughta try peanut butter......

That would work great as a slather for pork ribs with a simple S&P rub, then finished with a glaze of grape jelly. PB&JP )peanut butter and jelly pork)