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View Full Version : Spritzing: Not buying that it makes any difference


CentralOhioBBQ
06-03-2018, 07:21 PM
Apple juice. Apple juice concentrate. Vinegar brown sugar mixes. Iíve tried them all.

Aside from subtly, if at all, impacting the flavor of the bark- I see zero benefit. The old saying ďit keeps the meat moistĒ seems like BS to me. How does periodically spritzing impact the moisture of the internal meat? Bark forms whether you spritz or not, so the bark formation protecting meat from drying out, if thatís your belief, takes place regardless of spritzing.

Iíve recently stopped spritzing brisket, shoulders, chickens, ribs, etc. I see no positive benefit for the hassle (even though itís a small one).

I know others wholeheartedly disagree. Iím curious as to the logic against mine. Thoughts?

Joshw
06-03-2018, 07:24 PM
I rarely mop or spritz. The amount of cooking time it adds, is much worse, than the benefit you get. When I wrap ribs, I do like to put some apple/cherry concentrate in the foil. That does add a noticeable flavor. FYI, I don't like water smokers either, so I think it is a personal thing.

Bob C Cue
06-03-2018, 07:25 PM
I never spritz but the PBC provides a moist environment so I see no need.

The Wookiee
06-03-2018, 07:33 PM
Totally agree... unless cooking over open coals no reason for me either... Blonder at amazingribs did some tests saying as much as well.

https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/mythbusting-basting-mopping-and-spritzing

pjtexas1
06-03-2018, 07:43 PM
I never spritz. Opening the cooker over and over? Not good in opinion. But that's just me. Nothing wrong with spritzing if it works for you.

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hurricanedavid
06-03-2018, 07:50 PM
I agree with all the comments above but I still spritz my ribs. I guess I’m a creature of habit. I also use one large ice ball in my Old Fashioned rather than cubes, ice is ice....

shares
06-03-2018, 07:57 PM
I agree, but I'm a water cooker guy. The offset guys might have different experience.

Czarbecue
06-03-2018, 08:01 PM
It depends on my mood, to be honest. Some days I like to baby sit my meat and spritz. And when I do, itís with apple juice, vinegar, and honey warmed up to dissolve the sugars. Itís definitely noticeable.

pjtexas1
06-03-2018, 08:09 PM
It depends on my mood, to be honest. Some days I like to baby sit my meat and spritz. And when I do, itís with apple juice, vinegar, and honey warmed up to dissolve the sugars. Itís definitely noticeable.I would think honey would be noticeable.

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Czarbecue
06-03-2018, 08:15 PM
I would think honey would be noticeable.


Yep. If I want savory ribs then Iíll go to a Chinese buffet and get my peopleís spare ribs :heh:

tom b
06-03-2018, 09:07 PM
I usually spritz when I open the lid

pjtexas1
06-03-2018, 09:11 PM
I usually spritz when I open the lidIs that preferred over spritzing with the lid closed?

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ClintHTX
06-03-2018, 09:14 PM
I spritz with acv. It works for me. To each is their own? Who cares. If it works for you good. If it don’t fine. DO WHAT WORKS FOR YOU!

tom b
06-03-2018, 09:19 PM
no but I don't open just to spritz

Is that preferred over spritzing with the lid closed?

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CentralOhioBBQ
06-03-2018, 09:41 PM
I spritz with acv. It works for me. To each is their own? Who cares. If it works for you good. If it donít fine. DO WHAT WORKS FOR YOU!

Agreed, Iím not criticizing. Iím just curious if Im missing something in the logic.

Smoking Piney
06-03-2018, 09:43 PM
My experiments have not found spritzing to make a big difference. It will keep the outside of the meat moist, which will subsequently evaporate off in the heat, so I can't see how spritzing contributes to the overall moisture of the meat.

I think it's more about about the prep of the meats, how your pit cooks, and timing.

AKMIMNAK
06-03-2018, 10:36 PM
Apple juice. Apple juice concentrate. Vinegar brown sugar mixes. Iíve tried them all.

Aside from subtly, if at all, impacting the flavor of the bark- I see zero benefit. The old saying ďit keeps the meat moistĒ seems like BS to me. How does periodically spritzing impact the moisture of the internal meat? Bark forms whether you spritz or not, so the bark formation protecting meat from drying out, if thatís your belief, takes place regardless of spritzing.

Iíve recently stopped spritzing brisket, shoulders, chickens, ribs, etc. I see no positive benefit for the hassle (even though itís a small one).

I know others wholeheartedly disagree. Iím curious as to the logic against mine. Thoughts?

Exactly. The one thing I've heard claimed for spritzing that I agree with: it slows down your cook (not just because of smoker heat loss from opening the door, but from lowering the temp of the meat with cool liquid). If you want lower and slower, that's the only benefit I see. I don't do it.

Rockinar
06-03-2018, 11:01 PM
I quit spritzing. I don't think it does anything other than waste my time.

quamdar
06-04-2018, 05:41 AM
Agreed on it being a waste of time. Adds slight flavor to bark and I donít really see a difference in moisture. Maybe if you donít use a water pan and the air in your smoker is very dry you might get some evaporative cooling but Iíve never seen any difference. I feel like Iím just rinsing rub off if anything.

smoke ninja
06-04-2018, 06:15 AM
Spritzing and mopping can add flavor and effect color. What's in a spritz matters, it needs alot of flavor to add anything noticeable.

Spritz and mops are older techniques. Wrapping replaces them. Modern pits are also better....
Well I mean more controllable. Especially with thermometers. We can now walk the line getting hotter cook temps up to but before the point of burning. Old school, with no temp measure and less controlled fires can make use of mops and spritzed to help cool the surface. This is magnified on direct heat type cookers.

When I cook I take care to not let the bark get burned up. If it does the meat inside is likely nuked. There are multiple ways to deal with this. We can trim in a way that prevents this, add a difusser or plates, wrap before things go too far, move meat in the pit to cooker spot or even spritz and mop. One of my tricks has been to use aluminum foil as a space shuttle style heat shield to protect from the brunt of the heat.

Another tool in the kit and a way to layer in more flavors

IamMadMan
06-04-2018, 06:25 AM
Spritzing and mopping can add flavor and effect color. What's in a spritz matters, it needs alot of flavor to add anything noticeable.

Another tool in the kit and a way to layer in more flavors


I agree, depending upon your spritz, it can be another layer of flavor as Smoke Ninja pointed out. A big piece of meat will require substantial flavor to be added in the spritz to impact additional flavors.



Also, if for no other reason, I spritz with apple juice to give a very pleasing finishing sheen on pork that the crowd stands in awe over as it glistens in the light.

Czarbecue
06-04-2018, 06:54 AM
Also, if for no other reason, I spritz with apple juice to give a very pleasing finishing sheen on pork that the crowd stands in awe over as it glistens in the light.

THIS. My last brisket (yes, the guest towel one) was a no spritz cook and it looked like it came out of a bullís ass.

IamMadMan
06-04-2018, 07:04 AM
THIS. My last brisket (yes, the guest towel one) was a no spritz cook and it looked like it came out of a bullís ass.


LOL - Too Funny..... Thanks for the morning chuckle.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-04-2018, 07:30 AM
Also, if for no other reason, I spritz with apple juice to give a very pleasing finishing sheen on pork that the crowd stands in awe over as it glistens in the light.[/QUOTE]


This made me LOL..

Coat
06-04-2018, 08:05 AM
Spritz/mop/dip/etc is a huge difference maker in my cook. It's kind of a different animal cooking in an open pit, though. I can go without but the result is very different. On an offset it is less of an issue, but still adds significant flavor to the bark, bc my spritz is pretty intensely flavored.

m-fine
06-04-2018, 11:41 AM
I rarely spritz or mop on the offset. I tried a few different experiments and didn’t feel it was offering much flavor wise that couldn’t be accomplished in the rub, marinade or sauce.

What it does do is cool the meat and slow it down. The juices from the meat evaporating cause the stall, and likewise we can cause our own mini stalls with a spritz. This can come in handy if you want to pull something hot off the smoker at a specific time, and it is cooking a bit faster than plan. Cooking too fast, spritz and lower the temp. Cooking too slow, wrap and raise the temp.

fwdiii
06-04-2018, 11:56 AM
No, I do not spritz. Never thought the meat needed it.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-04-2018, 11:59 AM
I rarely spritz or mop on the offset. I tried a few different experiments and didnít feel it was offering much flavor wise that couldnít be accomplished in the rub, marinade or sauce.

What it does do is cool the meat and slow it down. The juices from the meat evaporating cause the stall, and likewise we can cause our own mini stalls with a spritz. This can come in handy if you want to pull something hot off the smoker at a specific time, and it is cooking a bit faster than plan. Cooking too fast, spritz and lower the temp. Cooking too slow, wrap and raise the temp.


Interesting take. I respectfully disagree on spritzing slowing down the cook.

If anything, opening the cooker will slow the cook. The evaporation off the surface takes place within a minute or two, and will not effect the slow and steady rising internal temp within a thick piece of meat, IMO. Opening the door of the cooker will, however. So maybe in the end i do agree with you, spritzing does slow the cook.

Sickboy579
06-04-2018, 12:18 PM
Never spritzed before until my last cook. Didnít see any benefit of it. I also use a rub. I think some who donít rub, spritz for that beautiful color.

BBQscott
06-04-2018, 12:37 PM
I like to spritz my ribs, I just make sure my spritz has plenty of apple juices, honey and spices. The water definitely evaporates quickly but will leave behind the sugar and spices (and every nice... hehe) in the bark at the end leaving a nice colored thick bark! I usually sprits once every 30mins and my spares still take around 6 hours to cook, I just get in and get out quickly. That’s what works for me! You also get the added bonus of seeing the meat once in awhile :D

aawa
06-04-2018, 01:32 PM
I have found that spritzing keeps the bark from turning too dark or scorching when running hot or when it is close to the fire.

I find though, that if you have good technique that a spritz isn't necessary.

m-fine
06-04-2018, 01:48 PM
Interesting take. I respectfully disagree on spritzing slowing down the cook.

If anything, opening the cooker will slow the cook. The evaporation off the surface takes place within a minute or two, and will not effect the slow and steady rising internal temp within a thick piece of meat, IMO. Opening the door of the cooker will, however. So maybe in the end i do agree with you, spritzing does slow the cook.

Look up how many BTUís it takes to increase the temp of water, vs how many it takes to convert it from liquid to steam. It is a very significant and why a cook can stall for hours as contracting muscle fibers push out liquid. The recovery time from opening the door will vary smoker to smoker, but a high airflow stick burner made from heavy steel will recover very quickly.

Stlsportster
06-04-2018, 02:04 PM
I fill up a large spray bottle with either beer or bourbon...when ever my throat gets dry waiting for my smoker to finish cooking ribs....I spritz a little right in my mouth.

Usually by the time the food gets done...I have a nice sheen too!

m-fine
06-04-2018, 02:12 PM
I fill up a large spray bottle with either beer or bourbon...when ever my throat gets dry waiting for my smoker to finish cooking ribs....I spritz a little right in my mouth.

Usually by the time the food gets done...I have a nice sheen too!

Have you done any A/B testing to compare the amount and quality of the sheen you get from beer vs bourbon?:mrgreen:

Burnt at Both Endz
06-04-2018, 02:49 PM
I sprtiz my ribs a couple times with water, like to start the pooling process when turning them over.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-04-2018, 06:41 PM
Look up how many BTUís it takes to increase the temp of water, vs how many it takes to convert it from liquid to steam. It is a very significant and why a cook can stall for hours as contracting muscle fibers push out liquid. The recovery time from opening the door will vary smoker to smoker, but a high airflow stick burner made from heavy steel will recover very quickly.

I cook on a Lang 84 as well, the thick steel def holds well.

Fair enough on your point, whatever works for you and I have no doubt it does. I still disagree, Not seeing how required BTUís to heat water vs evaporation impacts internal moisture getting pushed out of meat. Spritzing exclusively impacts the exterior and should have largely no bearing on the interior cooking process. Bark formation doesnít impact said internal moisture expulsion. In my experience the cook time/moisture has been the same.

I reiterate Iím not bashing anyoneís method, i did it for 10 years. It doesnít hurt anything. I just donít think it helps either.

OklaDustDevil
06-05-2018, 10:42 AM
Apple juice. Apple juice concentrate. Vinegar brown sugar mixes. Iíve tried them all.

Aside from subtly, if at all, impacting the flavor of the bark- I see zero benefit. The old saying ďit keeps the meat moistĒ seems like BS to me. How does periodically spritzing impact the moisture of the internal meat? Bark forms whether you spritz or not, so the bark formation protecting meat from drying out, if thatís your belief, takes place regardless of spritzing.

Iíve recently stopped spritzing brisket, shoulders, chickens, ribs, etc. I see no positive benefit for the hassle (even though itís a small one).

I know others wholeheartedly disagree. Iím curious as to the logic against mine. Thoughts?

I mopped and spritzed for years. Some of my early recipes called for mopping every 30 min. Which is a lot on a 12-14 hour cook. Particularly when you live on the 3rd floor and your cooker is in the drive.

Over the years, however, I always spritzed or mopped anyway, only to watch it run straight off the meat and onto the bottom of the cooker.

So one day I weighed the lack of any significant observable effect against the time, effort, and mess of doing it and have never spritzed or mopped again. If I need moisture, Iíll use a water pan. But, hey, for those who find it makes a difference, go for it ó I Just never found that difference.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-05-2018, 11:06 AM
I mopped and spritzed for years. Some of my early recipes called for mopping every 30 min. Which is a lot on a 12-14 hour cook. Particularly when you live on the 3rd floor and your cooker is in the drive.

Over the years, however, I always spritzed or mopped anyway, only to watch it run straight off the meat and onto the bottom of the cooker.

So one day I weighed the lack of any significant observable effect against the time, effort, and mess of doing it and have never spritzed or mopped again. If I need moisture, Iíll use a water pan. But, hey, for those who find it makes a difference, go for it ó I Just never found that difference.


Well said.

SlowmotionQue
06-05-2018, 11:29 AM
Apple juice. Apple juice concentrate. Vinegar brown sugar mixes. Iíve tried them all.

Aside from subtly, if at all, impacting the flavor of the bark- I see zero benefit. The old saying ďit keeps the meat moistĒ seems like BS to me. How does periodically spritzing impact the moisture of the internal meat? Bark forms whether you spritz or not, so the bark formation protecting meat from drying out, if thatís your belief, takes place regardless of spritzing.

Iíve recently stopped spritzing brisket, shoulders, chickens, ribs, etc. I see no positive benefit for the hassle (even though itís a small one).

I know others wholeheartedly disagree. Iím curious as to the logic against mine. Thoughts?

I wholeheartedly agree.

Rockinar
06-05-2018, 02:00 PM
If the greasy fat on and in the meat does not keep it moist, spritzing it with some apple juice sure wont do anything.

mstewart39
06-05-2018, 02:23 PM
I fill up a large spray bottle with either beer or bourbon...when ever my throat gets dry waiting for my smoker to finish cooking ribs....I spritz a little right in my mouth.

Usually by the time the food gets done...I have a nice sheen too!

I actually do spritz with bourbon. (usually mixed with a little ACV.) I don't know if it does anything to the moisture, but I LOVE the flavor of bourbon.

I may try an experiment and have 2 racks, one with a spritz and one without to see if there is any noticeable difference.

OklaDustDevil
06-05-2018, 02:34 PM
I fill up a large spray bottle with either beer or bourbon...when ever my throat gets dry waiting for my smoker to finish cooking ribs....I spritz a little right in my mouth.

Usually by the time the food gets done...I have a nice sheen too!

You have just persuaded me to resume spritzing after a 20-year hiatus . . . thatís what I love about this site: the sharing of new techniques!

Tioga
06-05-2018, 04:38 PM
I also dont see any benefit to spritzing, furthermore It really bugs me when I see a guy pour the extra marinade over the meat on the grill. It does nothing but make a big mess in the cooker.

Rusty Kettle
06-05-2018, 04:59 PM
Spritzing makes a difference. The bark is thinner when spritzed. Cook times increase and bark formation is slowed down. The bark will not be as developed. It helps. I typically dont worry about spritzing. The thing is it works but the more tender meat imo is from bark not being as developed. It doesnt help moisture. Just prevents thick bark from forming. Martenelli's apple juice as a spritz adds flavor and keeps the bark from becoming over developed. Foil works better. Spritzing works in a pinch.

medic92
06-05-2018, 05:14 PM
For the record, I don't spritz. Maybe a little when I was younger, but as I got older it became less and less frequent and now it hardly ever happens.



One aspect of spritzing that's being completely disregarded in this post is the science of smoke. Smoke sticks better to meat that's moist, so spritzing can enhance the smoke flavor of the meat. Other than that, I never noticed a difference.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-05-2018, 06:09 PM
After reading through the replies in this thread I’ve developed a hatred for the word spritz.

Never bothered me before. I think I’m also starting to inadvertently judge and stereotype admitted “spritzers”, even though I was guilty for years.

CentralOhioBBQ
06-05-2018, 06:18 PM
https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/mythbusting-basting-mopping-and-spritzing

Meathead has researched this ad naseum. He concurs.

smoke ninja
06-05-2018, 07:08 PM
https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/mythbusting-basting-mopping-and-spritzing

Meathead has researched this ad naseum. He concurs.

You know who does spritz?

Aaron Franklin

I can name a few other bbq celebrities who do. I'm sure you can name some that don't, probably even more than do. I find it's not how many but who. Most renowned brisket cook in the world or a bbq cookbook author. Both are credible.

pjtexas1
06-05-2018, 07:17 PM
One aspect of spritzing that's being completely disregarded in this post is the science of smoke. Smoke sticks better to meat that's moist, so spritzing can enhance the smoke flavor of the meat. Other than that, I never noticed a difference.

I guess that would rely heavily on the amount spritzed. A very light Spritz and that would help. Over-spritzing...wouldn't that wash off the smoke flavor?

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Burnt at Both Endz
06-05-2018, 07:20 PM
I guess that would rely heavily on the amount spritzed. A very light Spritz and that would help. Over-spritzing...wouldn't that wash off the smoke flavor?

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

Now, we both know that your not gonna get the smoke off your pit by using water, unless you have a wire brush too......

medic92
06-05-2018, 07:36 PM
You know who does spritz?

Aaron Franklin

I can name a few other bbq celebrities who do. I'm sure you can name some that don't, probably even more than do. I find it's not how many but who. Most renowned brisket cook in the world or a bbq cookbook author. Both are credible.


Steven Raichlen still tells people to soak wood chips. Even the professionals can get stuck in a rut. :wink:

smoke ninja
06-05-2018, 07:42 PM
Steven Raichlen still tells people to soak wood chips. Even the professionals can get stuck in a rut. :wink:

He's another bbq cookbook author......

......those that cant do teach

Springram
06-05-2018, 08:35 PM
Steven Raichlen still tells people to soak wood chips. Even the professionals can get stuck in a rut. :wink:

I am sure Aaron will be sure to change what he has been doing all these years if you will just give him a call......

Czarbecue
06-05-2018, 10:57 PM
https://amazingribs.com/more-technique-and-science/more-cooking-science/mythbusting-basting-mopping-and-spritzing

Meathead has researched this ad naseum. He concurs.


I know I may be one of the few but I think Meathead is a hack.

el luchador
06-05-2018, 11:15 PM
I know I may be one of the few but I think Meathead is a hack.

most of his science come from greg blonder who is a scientist and phd

http://www.genuineideas.com/GEBBio/gebbio.html

and blonder is definitely NOT a hack

m-fine
06-06-2018, 05:07 AM
most of his science come from greg blonder who is a scientist and phd

http://www.genuineideas.com/GEBBio/gebbio.html

and blonder is definitely NOT a hack

Blonder has a PhD, but it isnít in cooking. Like any scientist, he is prone to getting garbage results if the test isnít designed properly. Sometimes they have gotten it right, other times they have been way off.

medic92
06-06-2018, 07:30 AM
I am sure Aaron will be sure to change what he has been doing all these years if you will just give him a call......


I tried but it went to voicemail. Apparently word of my accomplishments hasn't made it to south Texas. Maybe next week.

jermoQ
06-06-2018, 08:45 AM
Buy two pieces of meat, same size. Do everything the same for cooking except for spritzing one and not the other and see what happens. I have been only using water lately but in the past, I have used water/vinegar or water/vinegar/hotsauce.

QDoc
06-06-2018, 10:08 AM
I think spritzing evolved from open air BBQ using large hunks of meat. I believed the old timers used a mop and liquid to cool the outer surface allowing the inner to cook without burning the outside. The ACV and spices replaced any spices that would wash off with just H20.
It is not necessary with small chunks and closed pits.

el luchador
06-06-2018, 10:27 AM
Blonder has a PhD, but it isnít in cooking. Like any scientist, he is prone to getting garbage results if the test isnít designed properly. Sometimes they have gotten it right, other times they have been way off.

lol.

I believe you.

Pray, tell me, what kind of bbq testing have you done and where are those tests posted?

Rib Rub
06-06-2018, 10:52 AM
When I donít wrap ribs, I spritz to get the ribs a little wet to reapply rub. I do it once every hour for like 3 hours. I donít do it to keep it wet or moist, just to get a little more rub to stick to help build a little more flavor and bark.