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View Full Version : I can't find butcher paper, so Reynolds Parchment or Alum Foil???


nevadasmoker
06-02-2018, 04:48 PM
...It is for a brisket flat. The parchment does not seem waxy at all. I went to their website and it says a high density paper with a non stick coating. Just not sure what that coating is. Which would you use between parchment or foil?

wihint
06-02-2018, 05:07 PM
Foil is my vote.

mchar69
06-02-2018, 05:08 PM
My vote is to go to the grocery store and buy a paper bag and use that.

Works great. Maybe you have one laying around.

nevadasmoker
06-02-2018, 05:14 PM
...I'm not sure what is in that paper. Is a grocery store bag food safe?

SmittyJonz
06-02-2018, 05:18 PM
I've used Parchment Paper many times. Just NOT Wax paper......Parchment paper doesn't hold up as Well as butcher paper when soaked in drippings but it Works......

ronbrad62
06-02-2018, 05:23 PM
I have used the brown paper bags as well as the brown wrapping paper you can get from the grocery store or office supply store. Either will work fine.

OklaDustDevil
06-02-2018, 05:36 PM
Go nekkid, no wrap . . . .

Rockinar
06-02-2018, 05:40 PM
My vote goes to foil. I tried grocery store bags and found they were a bit stiff and did not wrap well.

Foils is easy to find and works.

Timmyotule
06-02-2018, 05:41 PM
You can get a big roll of butcher paper off of Amazon.

KevinJ
06-02-2018, 05:49 PM
I've used Parchment Paper many times. Just NOT Wax paper......Parchment paper doesn't hold up as Well as butcher paper when soaked in drippings but it Works......What he said. :wink:

WareZdaBeef
06-02-2018, 06:25 PM
Neither. Grocery store brown paper bags. Best part, they are free.

WareZdaBeef
06-02-2018, 06:28 PM
My vote goes to foil. I tried grocery store bags and found they were a bit stiff and did not wrap well.

Foils is easy to find and works.

No offense, but its not like we are entering a Christmas gift wrapping contest.

morgan-que
06-02-2018, 07:50 PM
Get an oven bag be sure to cut a few slits to let the steam out. I tried on a brisket with great results.

ElQueTraz
06-02-2018, 07:52 PM
...It is for a brisket flat. The parchment does not seem waxy at all. I went to their website and it says a high density paper with a non stick coating. Just not sure what that coating is. Which would you use between parchment or foil?

I'd go foil as well.

pjtexas1
06-02-2018, 08:14 PM
Another note for foil since it's the flat.

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smoke ninja
06-02-2018, 08:31 PM
I've always wanted to try covering one in a cheesecloth

SmittyJonz
06-02-2018, 08:33 PM
Bacon Wrapped

mchar69
06-02-2018, 08:39 PM
Is a grocery store bag food safe?
Nope - many in here recommend them yet know they are a mortal danger.
Get a grip, people are afraid of paper.

WareZdaBeef
06-02-2018, 08:45 PM
Nope - many in here recommend them yet know they are a mortal danger.
Get a grip, people are afraid of paper.

LOL at people being afraid of brown paper grocery bags, but not being afraid of carcinogens from smoking. Bunch of oblivious idiots.

Tatanka
06-02-2018, 08:46 PM
I first learned about the butcher paper wrap on this forum and tried it with good results for the last few years, but now I'm going back to foil (the heavy duty wider type.) My reasoning is simple; maybe wrong, but simple: By the time we wrap our butt or brisket the meat is as smoked as it's going to get, so we're just baking the meat from that point on, so whatever holds in juices/melting fat the best is what I want. I've read repeatedly on several sites that once the meat reaches 140F+ it can't absorb more smoke flavor and believe it, so my goal after that point is to finish the meat to probe-tender while keeping it as moist as possible. Of course, a long rest on the meat before eating is as important as the foil. Yet another important thing I learned on this forum!:wink:

pjtexas1
06-02-2018, 09:16 PM
Tatanka...I think the reason for BP is that it allows the brisket to breathe a little better. This helps the bark stay a little firmer.

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Tatanka
06-02-2018, 10:30 PM
Tatanka...I think the reason for BP is that it allows the brisket to breathe a little better. This helps the bark stay a little firmer.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk


Understood. But when it comes to bark texture vs. juiciness of the finished product, I guess I value the latter more. To each his own.:wink:

An experiment I'll do on my next brisket is to mop it with my sauce just before wrapping it tight in foil.

pjtexas1
06-02-2018, 10:45 PM
Understood. But when it comes to bark texture vs. juiciness of the finished product, I guess I value the latter more. To each his own.:wink:

An experiment I'll do on my next brisket is to mop it with my sauce just before wrapping it tight in foil.

I put mine flat side down in bp. The BP gets saturated and the flat sits in the fat. If you are careful you can save the drippings. You know us Texans love bark. Nothing wrong with foil though. I used it for years. Still use it for butts. Post the one you mop. Interested in seeing how that turns out.

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IamMadMan
06-03-2018, 06:08 AM
I first learned about the butcher paper wrap on this forum and tried it with good results for the last few years, but now I'm going back to foil (the heavy duty wider type.)



My reasoning is simple; maybe wrong, but simple: By the time we wrap our butt or brisket the meat is as smoked as it's going to get, so we're just baking the meat from that point on, so whatever holds in juices/melting fat the best is what I want. I've read repeatedly on several sites that once the meat reaches 140F+ it can't absorb more smoke flavor and believe it, so my goal after that point is to finish the meat to probe-tender while keeping it as moist as possible. Of course, a long rest on the meat before eating is as important as the foil. Yet another important thing I learned on this forum!:wink:


People should use the method or means that works best for them and should never do anything just because another does it.


The fact that once the meat reaches 140F+ it can't absorb more smoke flavor is false, it will continue to absorb smoke even if it is at a reduced rate.


While it's true to say that the majority of absorption occurs up to an internal temperature of about 140 F, the meat will continue to take on smoke flavor past that point by a process called adsorption (notice different spelling from "absorption").

Note also that smoke flavor and "smoke ring" are different phenomena. This is a source much confusion among BBQ cooks and frequently when they say one they mean the other. Smoke ring formation does cease at around 140 F when the proteins begin to coagulate. There is not a necessary connection between these two phenomena however. You can have smoke flavor with no smoke ring, and it's even possible to have smoke ring with no smoke flavor by using a nitrate cure.

https://web.archive.org/web/20061210120151/http://montanasbestbbq.teddybearbbq.com/askpitmaster.htm

IamMadMan
06-03-2018, 06:18 AM
...It is for a brisket flat. The parchment does not seem waxy at all. I went to their website and it says a high density paper with a non stick coating. Just not sure what that coating is. Which would you use between parchment or foil?


Modern parchment paper is made by running sheets of paper pulp through a bath of sulfuric acid (a method similar to how tracing paper is made) or sometimes zinc chloride. This process partially dissolves or gelatinizes the paper. This treatment forms a sulfured cross-linked material with high density, stability, and heat resistance, and low surface energy – thereby imparting good non-stick or release properties. The treated paper has an appearance similar to that of traditional parchment, and because of its stability is sometimes used for legal purposes where traditional parchment was used. The manufacturing process for parchment paper is costly and very harmful to the environment, this paper is not made in North America anymore due to environmental issues. However, don't confuse Parchment paper with Bakery release paper, bakery release paper employs a coating which is deposited onto the paper's surface. The coating is silicone which is then cured with a suitable catalyst. Both of these papers are rated safe for direct contact with food, and are made for use at high temperatures. However they do not allow the meat to breath like butcher paper.


So if your only choice is parchment or coated bakery release paper, stay with foil because they will all cook in the same manner.

jasonjax
06-03-2018, 06:24 AM
I think the key here is it being a flat only.

I'd go foil with some beef jus wrapped tightly were it me.

Blizzard
06-03-2018, 06:50 AM
As mentioned, Amason has butcher paper by the roll.

Brown paper grocery bags some people are suggesting also have ink on them. So regardless of if the paper is safe; Iím fairly certain the ink is not.

smoke ninja
06-03-2018, 07:41 AM
The problem with the paper bag is they can be too thick.

Too much paper....or wrapping in multiple layers ruins the positive effect of using paper. I've seen many make the mistake. The paper gets saturated. This basically bastes the meat protecting the outside from getting too much heat. Doesn't happen if you over do it tho

SmokeHouse Blues
06-03-2018, 08:16 AM
Check out Burnt End Paper Company (BurntEndPaper.com). They specialize in selling unwaxed pink/peach butcher paper, made for smoking brisket. Its made in the USA, food safe and 100% wax free. It allows the meat to breath while maintaining the bark. It doesn't tear easily like most of the butcher papers on the market.
They have several size rolls to choose from. Its very inexpensive if you buy directly from them. I've tried just about everything you can find on the market and this paper is head and shoulders above the rest. I cook brisket at our restaurant every week and now that I've found Burnt End Paper, I won't use anything else. I am not affiliated with this company in any way. Its just a great product.

BillN
06-03-2018, 01:21 PM
In a pinch and if it is a flat I would choose foil, bark may suffer a bit but it will definitely hold the moisture. What did you end up doing?

kenrobin
06-03-2018, 02:10 PM
You can get a big roll of butcher paper off of Amazon.

This is how I got mine.

BBQchef33
06-03-2018, 11:45 PM
lol at people being afraid of brown paper grocery bags, but not being afraid of carcinogens from smoking. Bunch of oblivious idiots.


pm sent.

Read it.

Tatanka
06-04-2018, 03:45 AM
People should use the method or means that works best for them and should never do anything just because another does it.


The fact that once the meat reaches 140F+ it can't absorb more smoke flavor is false, it will continue to absorb smoke even if it is at a reduced rate.


While it's true to say that the majority of absorption occurs up to an internal temperature of about 140 F, the meat will continue to take on smoke flavor past that point by a process called adsorption (notice different spelling from "absorption").

Note also that smoke flavor and "smoke ring" are different phenomena. This is a source much confusion among BBQ cooks and frequently when they say one they mean the other. Smoke ring formation does cease at around 140 F when the proteins begin to coagulate. There is not a necessary connection between these two phenomena however. You can have smoke flavor with no smoke ring, and it's even possible to have smoke ring with no smoke flavor by using a nitrate cure.

https://web.archive.org/web/20061210120151/http://montanasbestbbq.teddybearbbq.com/askpitmaster.htm



I appreciate your comments. Yes, I should have more accurately said that the meat doesn't readily absorb smoke after an IT (internal temp) of 140F+, not that it doesn't absorb/adsorb any at all. Then again, it begs the question: How much smoke flavor in meat of various types is ENOUGH? It's part of the flavor profile and we are careful about other aspects of it (rubs, slathers, mops, sauces, etc.) so why not the AMOUNT of smoking itself?

Anyway, I seems like our different views are also influenced by our target audiences. Competitive smokers might be more inclined to emphasize things like smoke ring depth and bark texture quality, whereas folks like me whose target audience is my family, friends and myself is simply based on what we like as opposed to third party opinions. I've served my Q to at least a hundred different folks here in Minnesota and in North Carolina where I used to live and I've never had any "customer" say "Gee, I wish your smoke ring was deeper." or "The brisket was great but I really wish that bark were a little crispier." If they had, I'd have stuffed a burnt end in their mouths!:tongue:

m-fine
06-04-2018, 02:09 PM
Anyway, I seems like our different views are also influenced by our target audiences. Competitive smokers might be more inclined to emphasize things like smoke ring depth and bark texture quality,

Quite the opposite. Competitions donít judge smoke ring and it seems like most donít judge bark texture either.

As for smoke flavor and meat temp, you can cook a hunk o meat sous vide to say 155-165 (well above 140) and then put it on the smoker for a few hours and it will definitely pick up a smoke flavor but no ring.

How much is enough vs too much? I have definitely had oversmoked poultry, but I have never had a brisket that was too smokey. Bad smoke yes, too much good smoke...nope. It may be possible to oversmoke beef, but it would take work.

Ole Man Dan
06-07-2018, 12:46 PM
My vote is to go to the grocery store and buy a paper bag and use that.

Works great. Maybe you have one laying around.

OR...
Go to a Butcher Shop and get some Butcher paper.
A local Butcher shop gave me a partial roll with what looks like 25' or so of paper. I shop there, so it made it easier to give me paper.

fwdiii
06-07-2018, 02:14 PM
I like not wrapped best, but if butcher paper is not available, I would go with the foil.