PDA

View Full Version : What Size of Kamado Style Grill Compares with 26" Kettle?


vnmg331
05-29-2018, 04:00 PM
I had a thread a week or two ago on needing a larger grill and thinking of a pellet grill. Just can't get excited about it. So I've been thinking of a 26" kettle. However, what size of kamado style would have comparable cooking space to the Weber 26? I see the Vision at Sam's Club.

dadsr4
05-29-2018, 04:08 PM
https://biggreenegg.com/how-do-you-like-your-eggs/

EdF
05-29-2018, 04:53 PM
Generally "XL" kinds of sizes, but remember you can get grid extenders and cook on two levels. They're not likely to match a 26" without one.

sudsandswine
05-29-2018, 04:57 PM
I'm a big fan of the Primo XL oval due to its shape, and to a lesser degree, its size. It probably doesnt have as many square inches as the 26" kettle (dont recall the grate dimensions offhand) but it's extremely versatile due to the shape. You could buy several 26" kettles for the price of one though, so it wouldnt be the most cost effective way of potentially gaining cooking space, all else being equal.

Edit...looks like its 400sq in on the Primo and about 530sq in on the kettle. You can get another 280sq in or so by using the raised grates, but I've found them to be of limited usefulness due to proximity to the lid (aka you cant put thick cuts there).

vnmg331
05-29-2018, 05:54 PM
I guess I'm still thinking I will be happier with the Weber 26. I'm going to have to get such a big Kamado style to compare it looks like.

m-fine
05-29-2018, 06:47 PM
You would need the KJ BigJoe or the XL egg to get close to a 26” and cook on multiple levels to match and exceed the space of the Weber. The 24” Kamados are taller so there is more vertical room to do multi-level cooks, but they are also more expensive than 4+ 26” Weber’s.

If you want space and are willing to spend over $1200, look at a Weber Ranch. There are things that a 37” Weber can do that will make you smile. :D

Histrix
05-29-2018, 07:27 PM
This 32" KK Big Bad fits the bill! :)

m-fine
05-29-2018, 07:45 PM
This 32" KK Big Bad fits the bill! :)

If the bill wasn’t as big as the grill, I might have a couple!:mrgreen:

vnmg331
05-29-2018, 08:59 PM
You would need the KJ BigJoe or the XL egg to get close to a 26” and cook on multiple levels to match and exceed the space of the Weber. The 24” Kamados are taller so there is more vertical room to do multi-level cooks, but they are also more expensive than 4+ 26” Weber’s.

If you want space and are willing to spend over $1200, look at a Weber Ranch. There are things that a 37” Weber can do that will make you smile. :D

Where I run out of room on the Performer is with 2 zone cooking. I did 6 T-bones the other evening and was using the Slow n Sear and could only sear 3 at a time. Or I'll do indirect cooking with chicken pieces for company or pork chops and I just don't have quite enough room. I had thought perhaps with a Kamado style I could use the whole grate and would lose the zone over the fire, but I don't really know a lot about them.

m-fine
05-29-2018, 10:08 PM
Where I run out of room on the Performer is with 2 zone cooking. I did 6 T-bones the other evening and was using the Slow n Sear and could only sear 3 at a time. Or I'll do indirect cooking with chicken pieces for company or pork chops and I just don't have quite enough room. I had thought perhaps with a Kamado style I could use the whole grate and would lose the zone over the fire, but I don't really know a lot about them.


The insulation and shape of the kamado means You have to approach 2 zone cooking a little differently. You can use a half stone deflector to create a direct and indirect side, but often you separate the cook into indirect and then direct periods by removing the deflector.

Kamado’s can get hotter fast, but they take forever to cool down. This typically means reverse searing works much better. You cook at a lower temp indirect, remove the deflector and open the air up and in a few minutes you can be searing on a super hot fire. Even better, you drop a grate in low in the Kamado and sear just over the coals. To get the most out of a kamado you want flexibility in the vertical.

You get a lot of usable space this way because you can do the indirect cooking of your chicken or pork or whatever on two (or more) levels due to the kamado’s greater vertical space. The searing is quick enough that it is not a big deal to do two batches, especially with a grate just over the coals where you are literally searing for 30 seconds a side, and your sear zone is the entire width of the firebowl. In this sense, the 24” kamado’s will have a higher capacity than a 26” kettle. Cooking on a single layer, they actually have less space since the inside diameter of the firebowl (direct cooking area) is closer to 21”.

vnmg331
05-30-2018, 06:21 AM
The insulation and shape of the kamado means You have to approach 2 zone cooking a little differently. You can use a half stone deflector to create a direct and indirect side, but often you separate the cook into indirect and then direct periods by removing the deflector.

Kamado’s can get hotter fast, but they take forever to cool down. This typically means reverse searing works much better. You cook at a lower temp indirect, remove the deflector and open the air up and in a few minutes you can be searing on a super hot fire. Even better, you drop a grate in low in the Kamado and sear just over the coals. To get the most out of a kamado you want flexibility in the vertical.

You get a lot of usable space this way because you can do the indirect cooking of your chicken or pork or whatever on two (or more) levels due to the kamado’s greater vertical space. The searing is quick enough that it is not a big deal to do two batches, especially with a grate just over the coals where you are literally searing for 30 seconds a side, and your sear zone is the entire width of the firebowl. In this sense, the 24” kamado’s will have a higher capacity than a 26” kettle. Cooking on a single layer, they actually have less space since the inside diameter of the firebowl (direct cooking area) is closer to 21”.

Ok, that makes sense. I was thinking it was sort of like that. How big of hassle is it to remove the deflector and go into searing mode? Also does it take longer to get a Kamado lit and up to temp or less than a Weber kettle?

tenpenny_05
05-30-2018, 10:07 AM
Ok, that makes sense. I was thinking it was sort of like that. How big of hassle is it to remove the deflector and go into searing mode? Also does it take longer to get a Kamado lit and up to temp or less than a Weber kettle?

Not hard at all. The accessories from the CGS make it easy to remove grates and heat deflectors from a kamado. I couldn't imagine using mine without it.

I think you are comparing green apples to red apples a little bit with the 26" kettle and a similarly sized kamado. Slightly different styles of cooking that doesn't require the real estate a kettle provides.

tenpenny_05
05-30-2018, 10:10 AM
here is two family sized packages of drum sticks I did on memorial day with my classic joe (18" grate) Used my extender from the CGS, probably could have done a whole other package no problem.

m-fine
05-30-2018, 11:21 AM
Ok, that makes sense. I was thinking it was sort of like that. How big of hassle is it to remove the deflector and go into searing mode? Also does it take longer to get a Kamado lit and up to temp or less than a Weber kettle?

It depends on the deflector system, but most are easy, especially with a pair of welding gloves. Just lift out, set on something suitable and open the vents.

Time coming up to temps is similar to a kettle. With a blower, I can get mine up to 400 faster than my gas grill. It still takes some time to heat soak the ceramic but it is ready to cook.

EdF
05-30-2018, 01:08 PM
What m-fine said. A BBQ Dragon will really accelerate that temp rise for direct.