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smokinbadger
04-08-2007, 03:23 PM
Well, I talked my wife into me roasting the leg of lamb on the Klose rather than in the oven. We're both happy about that decision, as it turned out great. Here's what I did:

Deboned and butterflied a leg of lamb and marinaded it overnight in a mixture of yogurt, mint and marjoram leaves, lemon juice, garlic, salt and pepper. Here it is this morning in the marinade:

http://lh4.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk7l3RHqRI/AAAAAAAAAN8/7QG8n8GrxWU/s800/DSC02104.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Removed it from the marinade and rinsed off most of the marinade. Seasoned the meat with salt and pepper and then coated one side with the filling: Bread crumbs, chopped black olives, olive oil, lemon juice mint and marjoram leaves, pine nuts, garlic and lemon zest:

http://lh5.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk7mHRHqSI/AAAAAAAAAOE/AQhje1JANxk/s800/DSC02106.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Rolled it up and tied it into a roast shape with butcher's string. Here it is on the Klose where it gets indirect grilled:

http://lh6.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk7mXRHqTI/AAAAAAAAAOM/WiFx65bonVA/s800/DSC02108.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Here it is after not quite two hours, with an internal temperature of about 150F:

http://lh4.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk7m3RHqUI/AAAAAAAAAOU/6614JV3ubn8/s800/DSC02110.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Another view of the roast on a platter, resting before being sliced:

http://lh5.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk7nHRHqVI/AAAAAAAAAOc/o5LpLmn6UVA/s800/DSC02112.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Here it is sliced and ready to eat:

http://lh3.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk81nRHqXI/AAAAAAAAAOs/QJkosKZDL68/s800/DSC02124.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

Here's a nice salad my wife made to go along with dinner:

http://lh6.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk81XRHqWI/AAAAAAAAAOk/bmYDlmsx7WY/s800/DSC02113.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

And here it is all together with peas and oven roasted potatoes (with olive oil and rosemary)

http://lh5.google.com/image/smokinbadger/Rhk82HRHqYI/AAAAAAAAAO0/WMbV8k5Pb-8/s800/DSC02130.JPG (http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/%3Ca%20href=)

I hope you all have as tasty an Easter meal as we did!

jpw23
04-08-2007, 03:30 PM
Looks good man......not a big fan of lamb myself but, that looks good enough to make me change my mind.....good job!!!:biggrin:

smokinbadger
04-08-2007, 03:36 PM
Looks good man......not a big fan of lamb myself but, that looks good enough to make me change my mind.....good job!!!:biggrin:

Yeah, I'm not a big lamb fan either, but for Easter I thought I would follow tradition. Somehow, the yogurt seems to wick away alot of that objectionable "lamby" flavor. This roast could have been mistaken for a very juicy pork roast. This roast changed my whole perspective on lamb!

Kevin
04-08-2007, 04:05 PM
Looks fantastic. Makes me think about cooking a leg of lamb.

thirdeye
04-08-2007, 08:27 PM
That looks really good. Glad you tried the pit over the oven. I've never done the yogurt marinade on lamb, but I suspect it does take some of the gamy flavor away and it's bound to add some moisture too.

BBQ_MAFIA
04-08-2007, 08:34 PM
I love lamb and your dish looks great.

I'm going to have to give your version a try.

MilitantSquatter
04-08-2007, 08:38 PM
Really looks good !!!

chinesebob
04-08-2007, 09:31 PM
That looks great. I work with a lot of people that only eat lamb and goat so I'm constantly trying to come up with new ways to prepare it.
My usual fall back method is:
Boneless Leg of lamb
make incisions all over the leg and insert sliced garic.
Take Rosemary whole and place in the middle. Smother inside and out with olive oil
roll it like a fatty
Tie it up
smoke it on the grill for about 4-6 hours
Serve.

Plowboy
04-08-2007, 09:48 PM
Nice job. Wonder if a buttermilk marinade would go well with lamb. I can't say I've had a lot of lamb and have never cooked it.

icemn62
04-08-2007, 10:48 PM
My wife is a BIG fan of lamb. Maybe after seeing this thread she will allow me to smoke some for dinner one night. It looked very good.

tony76248
04-08-2007, 10:56 PM
That leg looks real good, but what did you do with remainder of the lamb?:wink:

swamprb
04-08-2007, 11:33 PM
Looks really good! Did you have the butcher de-bone it or did you do it?

smokinbadger
04-08-2007, 11:46 PM
Looks really good! Did you have the butcher de-bone it or did you do it?

I bought a "partially deboned" leg, which still had two bones to take out. This was pretty easy to do, using a boning knife. Since I was rolling it back up anyway, I didn't have to worry about the deboning being too pretty.

Muzzlebrake
04-08-2007, 11:56 PM
nice job, I am a big fan of lamb and have done it on the fire many times many ways.
for easter I went with the same kind of roast, left the bone in and hit it up with some of my curry rub. was pretty good, yours looks better I like the stuffing idea.

and what is a CFD optimized baffle?

smokinbadger
04-09-2007, 12:02 AM
nice job, I am a big fan of lamb and have done it on the fire many times many ways.
for easter I went with the same kind of roast, left the bone in and hit it up with some of my curry rub. was pretty good, yours looks better I like the stuffing idea.

and what is a CFD optimized baffle?

CFD=Computational Fluid Dynamics, the use of numerical methods to model complex fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena. This is the area I studied in graduate school, and I did a study in my spare time last year of the effect of the well-known "Bandera baffle" on temperature distribution in the smoke chamber of the Bandera. You can see the results at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/smokinbadger/Smoker_CFD

What can I say, I'm a nerd who likes to cook.

qman
04-09-2007, 06:23 AM
A truly georgous hunk o' meat. The whole meal looks wonderful.

PLOWBOY- Yes you can use buttermilk. I have done it that way.
But-buttermilk and Yogurt are chemically very similar, and I think the yogurt works better in a meat marinade. In my opinion, it brings more flavor, and I think maybe it has more active enzymes than the super-market buttermilk [very much part of the industrial food chain]

bowhnter
04-09-2007, 07:41 AM
That looks great! I am going to have to give lamb a try soon.

Oldbob
04-09-2007, 07:45 AM
I have Never Eaten Lamb...but that Looks Great...I Might just have to try it someday !!Thanks for the Pron !!!

Muzzlebrake
04-09-2007, 09:28 AM
What can I say, I'm a nerd who likes to cook.

LOL......... aint nuthin wrong with that, we sure do come in all shapes and sizes dont we?

Our comp team is actually made up of a nuclear engineer, a lawyer with an undergrad degree in electrical engineering and then me and another dumbie.
I am fowarding the link to your slide show to the nuke dude, he'll love it!

While I have to admit that your methods are way over my head, I think it is fascinating. Is that all computer simulated or do you have to do an actual burn and record results? Have you ever done any other models with different shaped/sized baffles? I have just come into possession of 2 different Bandera and am getting ready to mod them up, I would love to hear any suggestions that you may have worked out.

Thanks!

Arlin_MacRae
04-09-2007, 09:39 AM
I've never had lamb for breakfast before but if that plate were to cross my desk right now...

Great job!

Greendriver
04-09-2007, 09:44 AM
I'm no expert but I'd say you nailed it with your various ingredients both to marinade it in and the stuffing. I do like mine a little more rare tough but I would have loved to have seen if that was rare enough for me...if ya know what I mean.

Mark
04-09-2007, 09:47 AM
CFD=Computational Fluid Dynamics, the use of numerical methods to model complex fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena. This is the area I studied in graduate school, and I did a study in my spare time last year of the effect of the well-known "Bandera baffle" on temperature distribution in the smoke chamber of the Bandera. You can see the results at:

http://picasaweb.google.com/smokinbadger/Smoker_CFD

What can I say, I'm a nerd who likes to cook.

Impressive. I guess we should call you Dr. Phil. I also noted the temperature profile in the firebox. This confirms the need for heat shields.

PS: The lamb is impressive too.

smokinbadger
04-09-2007, 10:37 AM
LOL......... aint nuthin wrong with that, we sure do come in all shapes and sizes dont we?

Our comp team is actually made up of a nuclear engineer, a lawyer with an undergrad degree in electrical engineering and then me and another dumbie.
I am fowarding the link to your slide show to the nuke dude, he'll love it!

While I have to admit that your methods are way over my head, I think it is fascinating. Is that all computer simulated or do you have to do an actual burn and record results? Have you ever done any other models with different shaped/sized baffles? I have just come into possession of 2 different Bandera and am getting ready to mod them up, I would love to hear any suggestions that you may have worked out.

Thanks!

To answer the question about the simulation, it doesn't directly rely on any test data (i.e. actual burning). Since you asked, here's the theory behind this CFD calculation:

1. A volume is defined in which we want a solution. In this case, we want to know what's going on inside the Bandera, so the air volume inside the Bandera is defined as the "computational volume" or domain.

2. The domain is divided into small volumes, called cells, where the actual calculations get done. In this example, the domain of the Bandera was divided into about 600,000 cells, most of which are little rectangles or tetrahedra (like a pyramid, but with a triangular base.)

3. A portion of the domain is defined to be the area where the charcoal is. To keep this simple, it's just defined as a layer in the firebox of constant thickness. Since we don't want to spend days/weeks accurately representing each chunk of charcoal (and figuring out whether we want old or new Kingsford, etc.) we just define some properties for the layer, like how much it resists the flow of air through it and how much heat it releases. Both the flow resistance and the heat release depend on the velocity: for example as the air flow speed through the layer goes up, the pressure resistance goes up and the heat release from combustion goes up too.

4. The boundaries of the domain need to be identified as walls, inlets and outlets. You can see from the link I sent earlier how the firebox inlet are identified as inlets and the top of the exhaust stack is identified as an outlet.

5. Since the amount of air flowing through the Bandera is driven by natural convection (the hot combustion products rise and flow out, causing a partial vacuum which draws fresh air in) the model takes into account the density or the gases as a function of temperature.

6. During the calculation, in each of the 600,000 cells in the domain, calculations are made for the balance of mass, momentum and energy. These calculations are all linked, since each cell is influenced by its neighbors, and ultimately the balances in all cells need to be satisfied.

7. The calculation is an interative process, meaning all 600,000 cells need to be visited many times (in this calculation it was something like 500 loops) in order to get a solution with minimal errors. These days that means a calculation like this takes about 4-8 hours on a decent laptop. Not long ago I was running smaller calculations which required 24+ hours on Cray computers!

If anyone is still with me at this point, I will also mention that I would like to do some more modeling (my new Klose for example) but I need to negotiate another free software license to do this at home, since I'm not quite ready to pay the tens of thousands I would need to purchase the software. We use similar tools at work to analyze flow and heat transfer in automotive HVAC and powertrain cooling systems, but I keep the Q work separate and only do it at home.

Drop me a note if you have any other questions. Now I'm going to try and get a BBQ thread going with the propeller heads over at the CFD forum. :)

Westexbbq
04-09-2007, 11:02 AM
Great post, I have been looking for a good recipe and helpful hints for lamb and now have everything I need to know. Thanks for everything and I know several of us are now inspired to give it a go.
Great idea on the marinade too.

Mark
04-09-2007, 11:53 AM
Drop me a note if you have any other questions. Now I'm going to try and get a BBQ thread going with the propeller heads over at the CFD forum. :)

So do you have a "new & improved" baffel design? Perhaps consider modeling something into the baffel that promotes turbulent flow?

Muzzlebrake
04-09-2007, 08:26 PM
So do you have a "new & improved" baffel design? Perhaps consider modeling something into the baffel that promotes turbulent flow?

see thats what I am thinking.

I have a one piece directional flow baffle/water pan combo unit in my head

smokinbadger
04-09-2007, 08:50 PM
So do you have a "new & improved" baffel design? Perhaps consider modeling something into the baffel that promotes turbulent flow?

I haven't taken the modeling this far. There are two reasons for this: 1) I mainly did the CFD study as proof of concept that it could be applied, and kind of lost interest in it after that. 2) My Klose pit arrived and I have mainly been cooking on that ever since.

If I were to develop a new and improved baffle design, based on the CFD results, I would probably make the baffle a little bigger on the back side (away from the door, as this area shows slightly higher temperatures at each vertical slice as seen in pages 12-16 of the presentation.

The figures also show some "short circuiting" of hot gas along the two vertical corners on the left side of the smoke chamber. This can be most clearly seen in figure 17. I would probably add some little triangle baffles to close some of the air gap between the bowl and the walls at the height of the top of the bowl. Any baffles above the level of the bowl would probably not be very useful, since the meat in the chamber is going to affect the flow pattern just as much as any baffles in this region.

Regarding turbulence enhancement, the main source of turbulence in the smoke chamber is likely the shear generated above the bowl as hot gases rush past the relatively quiescent water vapor evaporating off the surface of the water in the bowl. The rate at which the temperature of the hot gas can be mixed with the temperature of the rising steam directly affects the height in the smoke chamber at which the temperature can be relatively constant in a cross section. One way to improve on this would be to modify the bowl itself, for example using a bundt pan (i.e. with a hole in the middle) or to use multiple smaller pans in the space where the larger one was placed.

Any of these ideas would require additional modeling or testing. Has anyone already tried any of them?

Mooner
04-10-2007, 10:29 AM
Very very nice. I'll have to try that.

Mark
04-10-2007, 10:33 AM
Any of these ideas would require additional modeling or testing. Has anyone already tried any of them?

No; but a Seebect effect thermoelectric fan could certainly increase turbulent flow. See the following link:
http://www.teamdroid.com/make-electricity-from-heat-its-easy/

Mark
04-10-2007, 10:37 AM
No; but a Seebect effect thermoelectric fan could certainly increase turbulent flow. See the following link:
http://www.teamdroid.com/make-electricity-from-heat-its-easy/

PS: Also see "Ecofan" (really cool but $$$)
http://www.magma.ca/~barkhm5/ecofan.htm