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View Full Version : Should Brisket Flat End Up Probing Just Like The Point?


Kanco Connection
03-16-2018, 06:32 PM
The point, with all its fat content, is an easy target and probes like butter over a wider range of temps, right? But nobody cares about probing the point--brisket is done when the thickest part of the flat probes tender. OK, we're clear on that.

But knowing what probing like butter feels like isn't always straightforward. A reference point could be helpful. So, is it fair to say that when a brisket is ideally cooked the flat will probe just like the point? Is that a good reference point?

aks801
03-16-2018, 06:46 PM
No way will it probe just like the point. The muscle structure of the point is looser to start with. And remember, there may/probably will be some tug when doing the flat probe test.

WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 06:55 PM
I have multiple probes and always separate the point from the flat because i get more surface area for bark. But if you don't have more then one probe, stick it into the flat till it reaches the temp you want, then remove the flat and stick the probe in the point till it reaches the temp you want.

pjtexas1
03-16-2018, 06:59 PM
I like the peanut butter feel as a better explanation.

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WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 07:14 PM
I like the peanut butter feel as a better explanation.

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Wouldn't that be mush?

Kanco Connection
03-16-2018, 07:25 PM
I like the peanut butter feel as a better explanation.

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OK. But still not any kind of similar reference point? that would be too easy i guess.

pjtexas1
03-16-2018, 08:37 PM
Wouldn't that be mush?Goes in easy with a little resistance on the way out. I couldn't truly understand either until I nailed a few dozen. Experience is the best teacher.

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WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 08:50 PM
Goes in easy with a little resistance on the way out. I couldn't truly understand either until I nailed a few dozen. Experience is the best teacher.

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Don't get me wrong. I admire pit masters that can probe just by feel. But, peanut butter, i am imagining sticking a toothpick in jar of peanut butter and moving it around. That, to me would be mush, and borderline soup. So i have to ask the question, how old is your jar of peanut butter?

pjtexas1
03-16-2018, 10:15 PM
Don't get me wrong. I admire pit masters that can probe just by feel. But, peanut butter, i am imagining sticking a toothpick in jar of peanut butter and moving it around. That, to me would be mush, and borderline soup. So i have to ask the question, how old is your jar of peanut butter?Maybe I keep it in the fridge

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WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 10:29 PM
Maybe I keep it in the fridge

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Ok this is very important....What temp is your fridge set at?

Czarbecue
03-16-2018, 10:36 PM
Soupy peanut butter? My brand is Skippy and I can stick a probe in it and it will stand. Maybe open a fresh jar of peanut butter and probe it.

Kanco Connection
03-16-2018, 10:38 PM
I approve of this hijacking.

pjtexas1
03-16-2018, 10:46 PM
Ok this is very important....What temp is your fridge set at?34

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WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 11:01 PM
34

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Scientifically this explains alot. The viscosity at that temp is more like probing cream cheese.

ssv3
03-16-2018, 11:12 PM
Depending how many beers I've had. Or the ones around me have had. Or just take it to the magic number of 203 to play it safe . :becky:

WareZdaBeef
03-16-2018, 11:30 PM
Depending how many beers I've had. Or the ones around me have had. Or just take it to the magic number of 203 to play it safe . :becky:

Im not trying to toot my own horn, but if multiplied by the power of ten, with a temp of 34 it equals 23.

stljay
03-17-2018, 12:13 AM
Ok when you probe the flat do you slide it between the grain or against the grain? I've found if it probed tender between the grain it's not always so yielding against the grain and that's at like 207F.

pjtexas1
03-17-2018, 12:15 AM
Ok when you probe the flat do you slide it between the grain or against the grain? I've found if it probed tender between the grain it's not always so yielding against the grain and that's at like 207F.I probe from the top and never gave any thought to the grain. Are you probing from the side?

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gtr
03-17-2018, 12:33 AM
Scientifically this explains alot. The viscosity at that temp is more like probing cream cheese.

Or like peanut butter that's been in the fridge.

Nuco59
03-17-2018, 05:37 AM
Thanks guys. I've got 3 briskets to do today and because of you, I'm in the middle of a dilemma.

3 jars of peanut butter but NO cream cheese to practice on. It's early enuff- maybe the Walmart folk won't notice I'm in my pj's.

ShadowDriver
03-17-2018, 06:27 AM
It's early enuff- maybe the Walmart folk won't notice I'm in my pj's.

Heck, folks'll wonder why you got all dressed-up for the trip!

Have fun!

Kanco Connection
03-17-2018, 10:24 AM
Ok. So, to review:

1. get a jar of peanut butter and put it in a 34 degree fridge
2. find the grain of the PB
3. insert probe against the PB grain
4. compare with probe tenderness of the brisket with the grain
5. spread some peanut butter on the point and make burnt ends
I got this:thumb:

WareZdaBeef
03-17-2018, 11:04 AM
Ok. So, to review:

1. get a jar of peanut butter and put it in a 34 degree fridge
2. find the grain of the PB
3. insert probe against the PB grain
4. compare with probe tenderness of the brisket with the grain
5. spread some peanut butter on the point and make burnt ends
I got this:thumb:

You should patent this. You will put Thermoworks out of business.

Burnt at Both Endz
03-17-2018, 11:18 AM
Dammit, you guys are over thinking this. You should be able to see when a brisket is ready.:shock:

https://www.facebook.com/GQueBBQ/videos/1829204417092502/