PDA

View Full Version : Suggestions for BBQ Fundraiser


Boston Smoker
03-15-2018, 08:10 AM
Hi Everyone,
I've been "volunteered" to smoke BBQ for a church fundraiser. I'm thinking that I'd keep it to 2 meats. Assuming 100 people, what would folks recommend I should smoke, and how much? And let's just assume that it's 60/40 Adults/kids, and that there will be sides like mac 'n cheese, baked beans, cornbread, pickles, rolls for sandwiches, etc. I'm definitely going to do pulled pork. I was thinking 4-5 butts (8-10 lbs each), and then either chicken or BB ribs. I have much more experience with BB ribs, but I'm thinking that I'd need to smoke at least 8 racks? People tend to go for the PP first. Some are worried that ribs are too messy. Crazy right? Assuming that only 1/2 of the people have ribs, and assuming 1-2 bones per person, will 8 racks be sufficient?

Or should I just go with chicken breasts or legs? I have plenty of space in my smoker. I'd probably plan to have the butts done well before starting the ribs or chicken.

Thanks in advance for the assistance!
-Kevin

ebijack
03-15-2018, 08:23 AM
You will have to check what the regulations for your state are.
Since food is being sold. Best if you have a safe food handling card. Pretty easy to get. Here, we have to cook on site and get inspected by the health dept. before serving/selling is allowed. They temp the butts. Get a Thermopen!
They inspect the church kitchen, refrigerators where food will be held. Like coleslaw, potato salad etc. So line that up early.
It is about making profit. You can save yourself/time effort buying the coleslaw, potato salad type stuff. Keep it simple.
I'd say just smoke pulled pork, served on buns. Your choice of BBQ sauces.
Smoke the butts naked. Dry rub while while/after you pull. Saves alot of time and dry rub and most can not tell any difference.
Anyway that is how we do it.

Boston Smoker
03-15-2018, 09:00 AM
Thanks. I'll check with the Church. I wouldn't be looking to bring my smoker to the church. So maybe that's issue #1. But also, I wouldn't be selling food per se. I would just be cooking for people who made a donation. Maybe it's just semantics, but I'll chase down the answer. I had donated a BBQ party in the past as a charity auction item. I prepared the food at my house and delivered it to the home of the auction winner. I checked with my insurance guy before I did that one and he said I was ok from a liability standpoint since I donated everything and wasn't taking any money myself. I'll let you know what I find out. Thanks again.

Beentown
03-15-2018, 09:34 AM
Churches are generally exempt from the same Regs as food service operations. They are for sure exempt in Ohio of which I am extremely familiar.

I co-lead a mens group at our church that cooks together once a month and do 4-5 outreach cooks a year. We are covered by the churches insurance. We cook for up to 500 at a time on occasion.

I would do pulled pork and boneless chicken thighs. You can pull/chop the thighs . At our one big fundraiser we do pulled pork and bone-in turkey breasts (injected with butter, broth, spog). I'd have sauce on the side.

With 2 sides we would assume 4 ounces of cooked meat per person especially considering kids being there. To be safe make that 8 ounces precooked weight per person as your yield will be over 50% and any extra can go for a "staff" lunch for the church. We also use scoops for the sides which coincide with 4 ounce servings.

keeperofsecrets
03-15-2018, 12:01 PM
It is important to portion your food. An easy way to do this is by knowing the size of your sandwich bun or bread. Another variable to consider is whether the setup will be cafeteria-style (you serve them) or buffet (they serve themselves). If buffet, go over the suggested amounts.
I do BBQ for charity often where I do pulled pork and shredded chicken along with sides. I generally serve 80 ppl and for that I make three butts and six chickens.For your crowd, maybe go to four butts and eight whole chickens. Sides are important since they take up space (inside and on the plate) and help you stretch the meat further. I tried ribs once, and I was surprised at little sold. Sausage is another meat you may consider. When I put kielbasa on the menu, it is highly sought after.

BBQchef33
03-15-2018, 12:51 PM
For estimating, i average 16 4 oz sandwiches per putt. (8lb butt yields 4lb usable).. soo 100 4 ounce sandwiches would be 6 butts. I would make at least 8 and pay attention to portions.

Chicken is cheap and easy.. 50 leg quarters and you will have plenty of proteins. cookem whole and section after they are them cooked.. (less handling).

Divemaster
03-15-2018, 02:15 PM
For estimating, i average 16 4 oz sandwiches per putt. (8lb butt yields 4lb usable).. soo 100 4 ounce sandwiches would be 6 butts. I would make at least 8 and pay attention to portions.

Chicken is cheap and easy.. 50 leg quarters and you will have plenty of proteins. cookem whole and section after they are them cooked.. (less handling).

I can believe that I'm saying this but Phil is right. (Did I say that out loud?)

I would stick with pork and use a measuring cup for service to insure that each sandwich is the same size.

gsmith
03-15-2018, 02:30 PM
I cook a pulled pork dinner for our church fundraiser a couple times a year and a chicken dinner once a year.

The pulled pork dinner consists of 6 oz pulled pork, bbq baked beans, coleslaw, cornbread, drink and dessert. $10 per person

The chicken dinner consists of a half of chicken, potato salad, corn on the cob, roll, drink and dessert. $10

Profit on the PP is just over $7 per plate
Profit on the chicken is around $5 or less

The main reason is that I do the shopping for the pulled pork dinner and someone else does it for the chicken. Pulled pork dinners raise more money.

Stay away from ribs as not a big profit margin for a fundraiser, at least not in my area.

bwram1
03-18-2018, 09:08 AM
For portioning, I got some servers from webstaurant.com

5.33 oz for plated Q (far left)
4 oz for Q sammies (not pictured)
3.25oz for sides like beans, mac or pasta/tater salad (2 in middle)
2 oz for slaw (far right)

They run around $4-5 each and are worth every penny...and then some.