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View Full Version : Should I season a new Lodge cast Iron Skillet?


blazinfire
03-13-2018, 05:43 PM
hey folks.. I just picked up a brand new lodge 12" cast iron skillet.. To my understanding it is pre-seasoned.. Should I worry about actually re doing that seasoning my self or are they pretty good with being ready to cook? Just couldn't find a solid answer on how well the factory pre-seasoning is. I knew this would be the right place to go for that answer!

Thanks in advance

Stlsportster
03-13-2018, 05:49 PM
Season it.

blazinfire
03-13-2018, 05:53 PM
Season it.

Yup.. that's what I'm assuming... waiting for a little more answers on this one

TyJones
03-13-2018, 06:10 PM
I have never purchased a new piece of cast iron, that being said, I own a lot a of it. All has been handed down mostly from my mothers side of the family, and some belonging to great great grandparents. Needless to say I just maintain it, never had to season it. I believe lodge to be a quality product, if they say you're good you probably are. On the other had it is a factory produced product and if it was me, I would season it.

blazinfire
03-13-2018, 06:14 PM
I have never purchased a new piece of cast iron, that being said, I own a lot a of it. All has been handed down mostly from my mothers side of the family, and some belonging to great great grandparents. Needless to say I just maintain it, never had to season it. I believe lodge to be a quality product, if they say you're good you probably are. On the other had it is a factory produced product and if it was me, I would season it.

Yup.. Thanks.. I'm just gonna scrub it with soap and water and do a very very thin layer of oil for a round in the oven..... It should if nothing else help the seasoning that's already on it.. For the record... looks like I got this baby for a steal! Got it for under $20..... On amazon or anywhere else on the market its $30... I got mine at walmart

wayne77
03-13-2018, 06:43 PM
Walmart always has them cheap. Season 2-3 more times before you use it for sure. It's going to smoke a lot. For that reason, I use the Weber for seasoning cast iron. Lightly season, put it in the piping hot kettle for an hour, shut the vents down and let it cool completely then start over.

mikemci
03-13-2018, 06:50 PM
Put it in there upside down or you won't get an even seasoning. The grease will pool up. Like mentioned earlier, do this 2-3 times.

GrassRun
03-13-2018, 07:41 PM
Though not a Lodge, I’ve had a great deal of success seasoning my rescued cast iron skillet with bacon, bacon, and more bacon. On the off days, I wipe it down with Crisco and bake it for awhile. Upside down in the oven as previously mentioned. It just gets better and better, so even though it’s “pre-seasoned” I say season it more, since that’s what you’ll be doing each time you use it.

Rib Rub
03-13-2018, 07:43 PM
I just bought a 12” pan at Walmart and says it is already seasoned. I did not redo it. If you do season it, I read that Soybean oil is a good oil for seasoning.

ClintHTX
03-13-2018, 07:54 PM
I wouldn’t season it again unless you really wanted to. My cast irons get better and better every day I use them. Use them. Scrub them with hot water. Dry it and coat it with oil. Repeat. I don’t see it to do you any good to strip what’s already on there and start over again. Unless it was on horrible shape. Use it!

ncmoose
03-13-2018, 07:57 PM
I wouldn't worry about seasoning the pre-seasoned stuff. Go ahead and use it. It will become more seasoned with use but it's ready to go right out of the gate.

I mean, if you have the time and inclination it won't hurt, but not necessary to use it.

KevinJ
03-13-2018, 08:12 PM
If you consider this seasoning then yes season it.

https://i.imgur.com/pIPfhID.jpg?1

https://i.imgur.com/bMPEJjo.jpg?1

Jrogers84
03-13-2018, 09:02 PM
I would strip and re season. I'm not a fan of the pre seasoning. That being said I always season once then cook fatty foods for a month or so. I never do multiple rounds unless I'm bored and not doing anything else or I don't plan to cook in it. The methods of seasoning and oil you use are all up for debate but if you go above the smoke point of the oil for an hour ish you're all good.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

16Adams
03-13-2018, 09:15 PM
If everyone did everything alike, no one woul ever leave home.

Now what the h@ll does that have to do with your question?? It means you have lots of options. Lots. My Lodge preseason were rinsed in hot water and started cooking. Mostly I use my Lodge loaf pans and presses.

I asked my 85 year old Mother what they did. This was with raw Weber and Griswold. Start frying. Bacon- lard- tallow- crisco- Butter- Wesson etc etc. She would often cook and strain the oil and leave pan on stove. Fried bacon and it’s fat would be used for subsequent meals. Bottom line they got seasoned thru use. The only time she reseasoned is if it inadvertently got wet and rusted, got to hot and ruined the seasoning.

Cast iron skillet was a work horse, not the show horse of today.

Cast Iron skillets are fun to cook with, interesting to research and if you’re lucky you’ll get an heirloom piece with family history.

Lodge makes a good product at a very low price.

Experiment, but mostly cook with it. Keep it dry then oiled.

blazinfire
03-13-2018, 09:19 PM
Alright..... So that's what I assumed.. it would be mixed opinions on this topic.. I also had mixed feelings on it.. I decided to just wash it good with soap and water to get it good and clean.. I did a full seasoning cycle in the oven. If anything it should help the pre-seasoning.. Tonight I cooked Chicken Fajita's..

https://i.imgur.com/iR1HwZXl.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/eOyfyc1l.jpg


Cleaned up nicely... Cooking Fajita's for the first time I was concerned for the chicken sticking but seemed like it worked out well.

pduck
03-13-2018, 09:28 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6Tz3HnnCFs

I bought a new Lodge pan, but I didn't like the bumpy surface. It was like 24 grit sandpaper. I sanded it down with an angle grinder to make it smoother like vintage cast iron. I didn't take it all the way down to baby's butt smooth, but I did remove all the roughness. I then seasoned it as in the video, but I used lard instead of Crisco.

blazinfire
03-13-2018, 09:41 PM
If everyone did everything alike, no one woul ever leave home.

Now what the h@ll does that have to do with your question?? It means you have lots of options. Lots. My Lodge preseason were rinsed in hot water and started cooking. Mostly I use my Lodge loaf pans and presses.

I asked my 85 year old Mother what they did. This was with raw Weber and Griswold. Start frying. Bacon- lard- tallow- crisco- Butter- Wesson etc etc. She would often cook and strain the oil and leave pan on stove. Fried bacon and it’s fat would be used for subsequent meals. Bottom line they got seasoned thru use. The only time she reseasoned is if it inadvertently got wet and rusted, got to hot and ruined the seasoning.

Cast iron skillet was a work horse, not the show horse of today.

Cast Iron skillets are fun to cook with, interesting to research and if you’re lucky you’ll get an heirloom piece with family history.

Lodge makes a good product at a very low price.

Experiment, but mostly cook with it. Keep it dry then oiled.

Yup.. I totally agree with you here!...I really don't think it needed the seasoning.. but I did it anyways. Don't regret my purchase of the 12".. but I do wish they didn't have it and I was stuck with the 10"... But I will use the 12" every day anyways probably.. I see a 10" in my future.

Seefyre
03-14-2018, 01:27 AM
My pre-seasoned lodge came "out of the box" as good as my trusty 30 year old. It's up to you if it makes you feel better but they really are ready to roll IMO

One Drop
03-15-2018, 02:52 AM
I found the factory seasoning excellent but it had a slight fishy smell, so I seasoned mine a few times in the oven with lard. The cool down after the heating cycle is crucial for getting the seasoning right.

I sautéed a bunch of potato peel and salt in lard, before using it the first time. I wanted a great surface I coud use without thinking about it an I'm glad I took the time, as it is completely non stick and levelling out fast. I always use metal spatulas to help smooth the service.

Great pans right out of the box, though my next purchase for summer outdoor cooking is a Germa Petromax dutch oven. They are designed beautifully to integrate with their camp stoves and to stack with other ones, and no more expensive than Lodge here.

16Adams
03-15-2018, 07:32 AM
Although Weber does have a cast iron line I meant Wagner.

Midnight Goat
03-15-2018, 02:01 PM
I use mine daily (especially for eggs) and seasoned them as soon as I brought them home. Factory season is ok but eggs will get torn up for sure. Pretty simple process, wipe w/ veggy oil and put in the oven at 450 for an hour or so at a time. I think I did this about 3 or 4 times for good measure. After that just cook and enjoy.

Cook
03-15-2018, 03:02 PM
I always season the new stuff. If you don't strip it, then I suggest you do my method outside on a gas burner. I never season cast iron in the oven. I'm positive that isn't what my grandparents did...nor the generations before them.

I gently heat the pan until hot, then crank the heat until it is as hot as you think it can get. Then I drop a heaping spoon of lard or bacon grease in the pan and swirl it around. You want to quickly coat the bottom while it is still scorching hot. Then tilt the pan at a high angle and coat as much of the sides as you can without spilling any oil. Dump the oil and swab out the excess with a ball of paper towels. Then wipe it out again with another couple paper towels...this time coat the outside & bottom with the moist towels. Let it cool and put it away. It will season further as you cook.

smoke ninja
03-15-2018, 08:49 PM
For my blackstone griddle i just kept cooking bacon. Bacon bacon bacon. For cast iron pans i bake on a few coats of oil and then.......you guessed it

Bacon