PDA

View Full Version : 1st time failed underground cook, and question on safe eating temps..


nevadasmoker
03-11-2018, 12:33 PM
...So I started burning wood at 10 am, did that for 2 hours, I thought I had a nice pile of coals, had some bricks inside there. I covered it well, I thought at least. Went to pull it 8 hrs later at 8 pm. There was still heat coming out. Unwrapped it, could tell instantly it wasn't done. Temp probe read 110. So back to the drawing board for the underground cooking.

So I then turned the oven to 350 degrees, put the 7.5lb pork butt in there for 30 mins then lowered the temp to 250 degrees and went to bed, kept checking throughout the night. Took it out about 7 hours later when probe read 185 to 200 degrees depending where I stuck the probe. My question is the meat safe? It may of got hotter then the 110 and cooled down. I don't know, that's the problem with underground cooking, you can't check. I guess I could run a temp wire next time. But the meat stayed in a danger zone most likely for a long time, but I did eventually reach a done temperature. Do you think it is okay to eat?

Titch
03-11-2018, 10:33 PM
How cold was your dirt at the time, jsut coming from winter?
When we underground cook we let the fire burn for at least 4 hours and lots of it.
cant help on the meat temp, me? I would chuck it.
Iron in the coals helps hold temp, never tried bricks

BillN
03-12-2018, 01:58 PM
All the pit cooks I have witnessed the fires burned over night and had a lot of river rock at least 12 to 14 inches deep in the bottom plus up the sides, not only were the rocks heated but the surrounding soil was heated as well. The banana leaves and the wet burlap prevent the meat from burning.

cowgirl
03-12-2018, 02:07 PM
I get at least a one foot bed of hot coals going. Also use hardwood so they will last through the cook. Not sure what went wrong with your cook. Had to have been not enough coals to last.
For pigs, I burn the wood for at least 4 hours, then bury the pig overnight.

Don't give up! Once you try underground pit food, you'll love it!

guero_gordo
03-12-2018, 02:08 PM
Not scolding, but if I had to cook with an unfamiliar system, I'd certainly want a thermo in there to monitor the progress, and record the high temp too. Both would have helped demystify things in this case.

scayne62
03-12-2018, 02:12 PM
The food is unsafe, I would throw it out. Was in the danger zine WAY to long.

jstrand
03-12-2018, 04:41 PM
I think maybe he ate some since he hasn't responded. :sick::-D

nevadasmoker
03-12-2018, 08:51 PM
....I didn't get a reply for awhile yesterday so I thought that was my sign to toss it.

For Titch's question, we had a very mild winter here, even cut on my AC today for a few mins, so I think the dirt was an okay temp.

Thanks for the advice BillN and Cowgirl, as well as the other replies. I'll try again soon.

tom b
03-12-2018, 10:16 PM
glad to hear you are still with us...

martyleach
03-12-2018, 11:21 PM
How cold was your dirt at the time, jsut coming from winter?
When we underground cook we let the fire burn for at least 4 hours and lots of it.
cant help on the meat temp, me? I would chuck it.
Iron in the coals helps hold temp, never tried bricks

Titch (hi!) I'm with you. I'd get rid of the meat. When I do a cook in the ground it is a fire for at least 4 hours with big rocks in the pit. I cover the pit with a sheet of steel and sand. No smoke or steam coming out.