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View Full Version : Lodge 10" cast iron chef skillet clearance at Wally's $7


kingjman
03-09-2018, 10:16 AM
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Lodge-10-Cast-Iron-Chef-Skillet-LCS3/35290398?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=2274&adid=22222222227023381064&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=t&wl3=40345668152&wl4=pla-78310881872&wl5=9019571&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=35290398&wl13=2274&veh=sem

Think it may be in store only.

10miler
03-09-2018, 10:22 AM
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Lodge-10-Cast-Iron-Chef-Skillet-LCS3/35290398?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=2274&adid=22222222227023381064&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=t&wl3=40345668152&wl4=pla-78310881872&wl5=9019571&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=35290398&wl13=2274&veh=sem

Think it may be in store only.

If I didn't already have 3 10" CI skillets I might be tempted. The link says $14.97 btw.

kingjman
03-09-2018, 10:29 AM
Ya, it does say $14.... Google search lodge 10 chef skillet results in this...
...and I just bought 2 @ that price.

SmoothBoarBBQ
03-09-2018, 11:52 AM
I've got a couple of these Lodge cast iron pans and they are kind of a pain in the butt. The surface is quite rough so even with a very good seasoning I'm getting quite a bit of food sticking to the surfaces. I looked online and it's kind of a known thing with cheaper cast iron pans, so a lot of people are sanding down the rough surface so it performs better.

Porcine Perfection
03-09-2018, 12:34 PM
I've got a couple of these Lodge cast iron pans and they are kind of a pain in the butt. The surface is quite rough so even with a very good seasoning I'm getting quite a bit of food sticking to the surfaces. I looked online and it's kind of a known thing with cheaper cast iron pans, so a lot of people are sanding down the rough surface so it performs better.

They just need a couple of decades of use.

10miler
03-09-2018, 04:20 PM
I've got a couple of these Lodge cast iron pans and they are kind of a pain in the butt. The surface is quite rough so even with a very good seasoning I'm getting quite a bit of food sticking to the surfaces. I looked online and it's kind of a known thing with cheaper cast iron pans, so a lot of people are sanding down the rough surface so it performs better.

I’ve got a new and an old 10” Lodge. I’ve used the new one for all sorts of stuff and don’t have a problem with anything sticking. I do prefer the older one, but I got it at a yard sale and promised the wife I’d resell it. I guess there’s still time. :)

What’s funny is that some Teflon skillets are made rough on purpose, and I believe that it’s to aid in the non-stickiness factor.

LloydQ
03-09-2018, 05:39 PM
Is that the right size for cornbread, or too big?

guero_gordo
03-09-2018, 06:35 PM
Is that the right size for cornbread, or too big?

No such thing, make more dough ;-)

10miler
03-09-2018, 08:32 PM
Is that the right size for cornbread, or too big?

Itís the perfect size for cornbread. 2 boxes of Jiffy corn muffin mix fits perfect.

Joshw
03-09-2018, 10:37 PM
I have one, and like it. The chefs skillet has sloped sides, instead of the standard straight sides on most CI skillets. It is nice for sauteing. It also has a slight curve to the handle, which for me, is harder to hold onto when it gets hot. So I don't use it in the oven much.

mbshop
03-10-2018, 02:35 AM
The older ci skillets were rougher than the newer versions. I wouldn't do to much smoothing of the surface. Maybe just some rough peaks.

One Drop
03-10-2018, 03:38 AM
I bought a new one a little while back and after doing a few oven seasonings nothing sticks, Use metal spatulas and the bottom will smooth out quickly enough, mine is already unrecognisable after 6 months.

Not glassy smooth by any means but certainly non-stick. Glassy smooth cast iron has trouble holding on to seasoning.

Blizzard
03-10-2018, 05:31 AM
For those who think new cast iron is rough and needs to be sanded smooth first, check out carbon steel pans.

Carbon steel pans cook like cast iron but are much much better. They are smoother right from the start and donít require as much maintenance as CI. Plus they arenít as heavy so itís easier to move around.

SmoothBoarBBQ
03-10-2018, 08:16 AM
I’ve got a new and an old 10” Lodge. I’ve used the new one for all sorts of stuff and don’t have a problem with anything sticking. I do prefer the older one, but I got it at a yard sale and promised the wife I’d resell it. I guess there’s still time. :)

What’s funny is that some Teflon skillets are made rough on purpose, and I believe that it’s to aid in the non-stickiness factor.

Try doing scrambled eggs and see how it works out. When I got my first cast iron I seasoned it after every use and it was smooth like glass all the time. But my wife used it to brown some beef and then added a bunch of tomato sauce and that acid ruined the seasoning. She then left it to soak overnight and when I saw it in the morning it was orange like the sun. haha I hit it with steel wool and re-seasoned it but it never worked the same.

10miler
03-10-2018, 08:56 AM
Try doing scrambled eggs and see how it works out. When I got my first cast iron I seasoned it after every use and it was smooth like glass all the time. But my wife used it to brown some beef and then added a bunch of tomato sauce and that acid ruined the seasoning. She then left it to soak overnight and when I saw it in the morning it was orange like the sun. haha I hit it with steel wool and re-seasoned it but it never worked the same.

I make scrambled eggs and have even made omelettes in them. These days though I usually use a different pan for eggs since I don’t need that CI heat to sear. I should try it for eggs tomorrow morning just to see. Maybe you need to throw yours in some coals to burn everything off and start from scratch.

Joshw
03-10-2018, 10:38 AM
Try doing scrambled eggs and see how it works out. When I got my first cast iron I seasoned it after every use and it was smooth like glass all the time. But my wife used it to brown some beef and then added a bunch of tomato sauce and that acid ruined the seasoning. She then left it to soak overnight and when I saw it in the morning it was orange like the sun. haha I hit it with steel wool and re-seasoned it but it never worked the same.

You really can't blame the pan, for your wife mistreating it. You should avoid anything acidic for several months of use. No beans either. You should never leave CI in water overnight. If you want it to stay nice, it should be cleaned shortly after using, and oiled and baked in the oven. It will treat you as well as you treat it.

SmoothBoarBBQ
03-10-2018, 10:55 AM
I make scrambled eggs and have even made omelettes in them. These days though I usually use a different pan for eggs since I donít need that CI heat to sear. I should try it for eggs tomorrow morning just to see. Maybe you need to throw yours in some coals to burn everything off and start from scratch.

This is a good idea. I have two that I use for general purpose and both are about in the same place in terms of seasoning. I'm going to sand one down and do the other your way and see how they perform afterwards. Thanks

10miler
03-10-2018, 11:21 AM
This is a good idea. I have two that I use for general purpose and both are about in the same place in terms of seasoning. I'm going to sand one down and do the other your way and see how they perform afterwards. Thanks


I look forward to hearing your results!

93_confirmed
03-10-2018, 05:28 PM
I gave up on modern cast iron and have been searching CL for used brands from back when they were made smooth.

wayne77
03-10-2018, 09:36 PM
My lodge works just as well as my griswold. Smooth, rough, doesn't matter. Season and use it.

One Drop
03-11-2018, 03:24 AM
For those who think new cast iron is rough and needs to be sanded smooth first, check out carbon steel pans.

Carbon steel pans cook like cast iron but are much much better. They are smoother right from the start and donít require as much maintenance as CI. Plus they arenít as heavy so itís easier to move around.

I prefer cast iron for a few things, like corn bread and potato dishes, or times I need a good griddle like surface that stays how a long time to cook a bunch of things, but for pure searing and stovetop to oven finishing meats and I far prefer carbon steel.

They are by far the most used pans in restaurant kitchens in Europe, they are far more practical due to reduced weight and being more reactive to temperature changes due to being thinner. But I am more careful of the seasoning on them, I'll simmer things in cast iron for short periods but would never do so in a steel pan.

My latest triumph is recreating Smash burgers in my De Buyer Pan, I use a smaller steel pan to smash the meat into the surface of the larger one, super hot and painted with clarified butter, pushing down for ten seconds. I use a metal fish spatula to scrape the burger off for flipping, the crust is impossibly rich and the sear incredibly even and intense tasting (I crumble some beef stock into the SPOG seasoning).

Everything sears better on these and won't leave any black traces, not always the case for cast iron.

Both are infinitely better than Teflon pans, which always slightly steam things at the same time as searing them. I despise them with all of my being, even though I still use one once in a while for certain things.