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LabradorQue
02-06-2018, 12:32 PM
All,

My apologies if this topic has been discussed before, but here goes. When I get stuck in a YouTube hole, watching PBS videos on Franklin barbecue, it always amazes me that Aaron's firebox doors are wide open with no damper doors in use. While I know that white, billowing, or stale smoke is bad, is quickly moving smoke better and/or cleaner than slow moving blue smoke? The faster the airspeed of the cooking air (Convection), the more moisture from the meat and cook chamber would be driven off? I would presume this would lead to faster cook times? I would also wager that a water pan would keep the cooking chamber moist enough for adequate bark formation, even with this increased airflow? Low and slow is of course the order of the day, but has anyone experimented with fast flowing smoke, versus slow smoke? Does this specifically have any impact on flavor development? Very curious about this topic, thanks!

SmittyJonz
02-06-2018, 12:47 PM
It depends on the size of the smoker therefore size of the fire needed and draw required.
Smaller cooker with smaller fire can draw plenty thru adequate sized intakes. Franklins don’t have have intakes so door stays open for draw but his smoker and fire is bigger than backyard smokers.
Door open or intakes open w door closed - whatever works for your smoker to get clean burning Fire with TBS to Invisible smoke.

SmittyJonz
02-06-2018, 12:58 PM
Draw also affects the temps across the smoker - Too Much or Too Little will cause Hot Spot or bigger temp. Variance end to end. Just gotta find the right draft for balance of temps with clean smoke.......... firebox size, hole from FB to cook chamber size, location and shape, deflector/baffle style, exhaust size all play a part........

pjtexas1
02-06-2018, 02:03 PM
i never think about the speed of airflow as long as i have a clean burning fire. i never leave my door open longer than a minute to give a bigger log time to catch fire. i cook everything over 300 and the airflow is going to be faster than you cooking low and slow assuming the same size fire. i never use water and never have issues with bark.

now in my insulated cabinets airflow is very minimal and smoke flavor is a little lighter than the stick burner.

Beentown
02-06-2018, 02:06 PM
I run wide open on both the intake and exhaust. I control temps with fire size, no matter the stick burner being used. Always a good flow of air...

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Rockinar
02-06-2018, 03:16 PM
Slow smoke will not be drafting as well as fast smoke so the fire will not be burning as efficient. So yes it will affect flavor profile.

Goal is always fast smoke unless you like creosote flavor.

Jrogers84
02-06-2018, 03:31 PM
I run wide open on both the intake and exhaust. I control temps with fire size, no matter the stick burner being used. Always a good flow of air...

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

This is an acquired skill that you get from experience....

One Drop
02-06-2018, 03:43 PM
Regarding moisture, the wood releases a great deal of it during combustion, which keeps the meat from drying out overly quickly. So that smoke rolling over the meat is also made up of a good deal of steam.

Charcoal contains very little moisture, hence the typical use water pans in charcoal smokers. Spritzing is as much for putting moisture in the cooker as for actually wetting the meat at the time you spray it.

LabradorQue
02-06-2018, 06:12 PM
Ahhh, creosote!! I (don't!) love the smell of creosote in the morning....smells like Victory! LOL!