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Boisblancboy
02-01-2018, 05:22 PM
Now first off I know there is know magic number for how many hours per lb a brisket can take. I’ve been cooking briskets on a gasser for years but never really paid much attention to overall cook time. While doing those I’ve cooked them at 225F.

Now since I have an offset and have a couple short cooks under my belt and know how to run the new cooker I’m going to cook a brisket for Super Bowl Sunday. This cooker seems to like to run right between 250-275. At that temp and a 16 pretrimmed brisket, which I’m sure will be 13-14 lbs after trimming any rough idea for total cook time vs the 1-1.5 per lb?

Overall question should have been how much noticed different in cook time on average have you just noticed from a 225 cook temp vs a 275 cook temp?

SmittyJonz
02-01-2018, 06:12 PM
8-10 hours.

smoke ninja
02-01-2018, 06:30 PM
Hours per pound is no good. General size shape diameter thickness is better. Small brisket of under 12 id guess 8 hrs. Under 18 maybe 12 hrs and large one shouldn't take much more than 14 hrs. Of course all these answer have some give or take. Trimming matters. For that much so does each individual brisket. Ive trimmed 7 lbs of fat off a14 lbs'er before but then only 5 off an 18

Your mileage may vary which is why i recommend finishing 2-4 hrs early at least and hold until service

Jason TQ
02-01-2018, 06:59 PM
8-10 hours.

Ya around this timeline.

Boisblancboy
02-01-2018, 06:59 PM
Hours per pound is no good. General size shape diameter thickness is better. Small brisket of under 12 id guess 8 hrs. Under 18 maybe 12 hrs and large one shouldn't take much more than 14 hrs. Of course all these answer have some give or take. Trimming matters. For that much so does each individual brisket. Ive trimmed 7 lbs of fat off a14 lbs'er before but then only 5 off an 18

Your mileage may vary which is why i recommend finishing 2-4 hrs early at least and hold until service

Are you talking weight as it goes on the smoker or before you trim? Iím sure you talking about as it goes on the cooker.

So judging by your times and from my experience the cook time is much quicker from 225 to 275.

Burnt at Both Endz
02-01-2018, 07:06 PM
Are you talking weight as it goes on the smoker or before you trim? Iím sure you talking about as it goes on the cooker.

So judging by your times and from my experience the cook time is much quicker from 225 to 275.

You can't get caught up in weight, it's the thickness of the flat and amount of fat left on the brisket that makes a big difference.

Around 260* is when the cook times really start getting quicker, then at about 325*.

Figure some extra time for your first one, it will hold well.

Boisblancboy
02-01-2018, 07:20 PM
You can't get caught up in weight, it's the thickness of the flat and amount of fat left on the brisket that makes a big difference.

Around 260* is when the cook times really start getting quicker, then at about 325*.

Figure some extra time for your first one, it will hold well.


Great thank you. Never heard it explained quiet like this.

I do trim my briskets pretty liberally. After the first couple I did and didnít trim enough and then to watch my bark fall off the fat was disappointing.

smoke ninja
02-01-2018, 08:40 PM
The closer your cook temp is to probe tender temp the slower things move, IT obviously cant exceed cook temp

think about cook temp in terms of degrees above finish temp.

At 225 you are about 25 degrees above finish.

At 275 you are over 50 degrees above finish. While its only 50 degrees its 2x or 100% more above finish temp.

TheSmoke
02-02-2018, 06:57 AM
Hopefully you're not cooking your first brisket for a big group of hungry folks at a Super Bowl party (: That is a high risk endeavor. But if you are, I recommend you give yourself an extra hour or two of time to have a little pad in case you have a stubborn brisket or some unplanned contingencies occur. That brisket will hold for hours and hours so there is not much downside to giving yourself a few extra hours to have a nice relaxing day and not have to worry about having a not-quite-done brisket at kickoff.

mrboy
02-02-2018, 08:42 AM
8-10 hours, give yourself plenty of rest time and that will give you the room to fudge your cook time if you need it.

Right on Q
02-02-2018, 09:34 AM
I always plan 2-3 hours for resting and give myself an add'l hour on top of that as a cushion.

8-10 hours should be fine. On the faster side if you wrap

Boisblancboy
02-02-2018, 11:24 AM
Alright guys. I think with this 16lb’er before trimming and a cook temp of 250-75, I’ll give myself 12hrs from start of cook to dinner.

mtmota
02-03-2018, 07:37 AM
My 2 cents... 13lb... hmmmm make sure you leave plenty of fat.. over trimming big ones can usually end with a dry flat.... once you lop off to much while not an ender youíll have to adjust and baby it more... 13lb use to be my go to size... Iíd recommend shoot to maintain for 250... cook time likely about 10-12 hrs depending the diff between where your gauge is in proximity to your grate.... send some pics of it before once prepped and once done....


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

sudsandswine
02-03-2018, 08:40 AM
This point is moot if you cook to probe tender, but if you monitor your internal meat temps and cook at 275* this time instead of 225* where you have been cooking, your meat is going to finish at a higher temp, but it will do so in less hours.

Example...back before I saw the error of my ways and I cooked at 225*, a brisket could be probe tender between 195 and 200* for me....but if cooking at 275* or higher, probe tender will occur somewhere between 205 and 215*, usually in the 208 to 210* range at 275* and slightly higher if I'm mostly running at 300* or above.

So....longer cook time due to lower cook temp, probably going to probe tender at 200* or below....shorter cook time due to higher cook temp, probably going to probe tender at the 210* range. I cook at 275* or so and have been removing my temperature probes once the brisket gets to 195-200*, then I rely on probe test every 20-30 minutes. It's the only way I've found to override my inclination to let numbers influence my decision on when to pull the brisket.

Works for me, but your mileage may vary :thumb:

wahoowad
02-03-2018, 12:38 PM
...your meat is going to finish at a higher temp, but it will do so in less hours.

Example...back before I saw the error of my ways and I cooked at 225*, a brisket could be probe tender between 195 and 200* for me....but if cooking at 275* or higher, probe tender will occur somewhere between 205 and 215*, usually in the 208 to 210* range at 275* and slightly higher if I'm mostly running at 300* or above.

So....longer cook time due to lower cook temp, probably going to probe tender at 200* or below....shorter cook time due to higher cook temp, probably going to probe tender at the 210* range. I cook at 275* or so and have been removing my temperature probes once the brisket gets to 195-200*, then I rely on probe test every 20-30 minutes. It's the only way I've found to override my inclination to let numbers influence my decision on when to pull the brisket.

Works for me, but your mileage may vary :thumb:

I'm trying hard to get away from the 'pull at 203' way I started out. It's just hard to wrap my head around cooking a brisket longer when I feel like they sometimes appear dry when pulled at 203. Keeping it in the heat even longer just makes me think it will dry out that much more. I just need to do it one time and see.

sudsandswine
02-03-2018, 01:18 PM
When I had briskets not turn out how I liked, it was 4/5 times undercooked and not sufficiently rendered (not passing the pull test), with 1/5 being overcooked and falling apart (and dry). As long as I've caught it in time where it's probe tender and doesn't sit on there another 30-60 minutes, I've not had an overdone one.