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Yakfishingfool
03-30-2007, 05:52 PM
OK guys, maybe a newbie question, but after searching for half an hour I'm still lost....

Can someone describe or characterize the difference in smoker set-up as a function of how they cook? Are cooking techniques the same across the boards? How does a bullet smoker and the offset smoker compare to the box smoker or pellet smoker?

I get the idea of indirect heat, the addition of smoke, and the ability to control temperature. Is that all there is to it? If you can control those variable does it matter what type of smoker you use??? Thanks. Scott

Puppyboy
03-30-2007, 05:59 PM
I know only about my off set. But I would say it boils down to user preference.

Mooner
03-30-2007, 06:56 PM
I know only about my off set. But I would say it boils down to user preference.

Yeah I would agree, to each his own. The advantage to bullets over offsets are that you don't need near as much fuel to cook and they usually need less fire maintainance. Their also a lot cheaper if your looking at a true competition offset, but they also don't hold as much meat as an offset. So you may need 2 or 3 bullets to do what one offset can do. Again, it's personal preference.

icemn62
03-30-2007, 09:22 PM
I have only used bullet types, but I agree. The big difference as far as cooking ability is in the cook, not the cooker. You can cook more food on a bigger cooker, but more goes into the fire control, and the like.

Yakfishingfool
03-30-2007, 09:37 PM
I understand that skill of the Chef has a lot to do with it. what I am trying to figure out is what variable the smoker brings into the mix. Is Poobah going to produce consistant food across all range of smokers?? If so, and I think that's true, what determines an offset form a bullet from a box. Obviously things like wall thickness affect heat control, vents, etc. But is that all there is to it? essentially any cooker will cook anything? Which ay very well be the answer in which case it truly comes down to how much green is in the wallet and what would you rather do? gas, electric, stick, coals, etc. Scott

Mooner
03-30-2007, 09:50 PM
Honetly Scott, the only two things I have ever had trouble on were one of those cheap stainless steel bullet smokers from Cabelas and a very cheap New Braunfels although NB does make a very good pit (this one just wasn't). Both of these were made out of very thin metal and just didn't cut the mustard. Temps were all over the place, bottom of meat was burned to hell. They just weren't good designs. If you spend a few hundred dollars you will get a fine cooker. If you want a bullet, get a Big Green Egg or a Weber Smokey Mountain. Offsets are just about as diverse as you can get. Bandera's are great, many of the guys here will tell you that. Just get something that looks like it's put together well, has good draft venting and doesn't look like it will dent if you touch it. I wouldn't get a propane cooker simply because you can't use it in competition and well...honestly, I just hate em. Any good charcoal cooker will do you just fine. Also, a heavy duty BBQ thermometer is a must. Get a good expensive one! you will be glad you did.

QansasjayhawQ
03-30-2007, 09:54 PM
I understand that skill of the Chef has a lot to do with it. what I am trying to figure out is what variable the smoker brings into the mix. Is Poobah going to produce consistant food across all range of smokers?? If so, and I think that's true, what determines an offset form a bullet from a box. Obviously things like wall thickness affect heat control, vents, etc. But is that all there is to it? essentially any cooker will cook anything? Which ay very well be the answer in which case it truly comes down to how much green is in the wallet and what would you rather do? gas, electric, stick, coals, etc. Scott

You know, I think this is a VERY good question because it sits close to my chosen profession of computers and software.

Now, I truly, honestly, do NOT want to start some kind of computer user war here, but I see similar situations each and every day.

You can use all kinds of similar tools, as humans do, but the one that ALWAYS works the best is the one that you have the most practice with and know the best.

Macintosh, Windows, Linux - they are all computers and they each have their advantages and drawbacks.

Fords, Chevys, Toyotas, Dodges, Mazdas, etc. - they are all cars and they each have their advantages and drawbacks.

So, really, in my humble opinion, I'd say that the smoker with which you have the most experience and the smoker you are most comfortable with is going to be the best for you.

Sure there are differences in fuel consumption, heat consistency and many other variables . . . but you learn to compensate for those with practice.

There's a saying where I work . . . 'We've been asked to do more and more with less and less until now we are qualified to do anything with nothing!'

Humorous, but the truth in the saying is that, once you have so much practice with a particular situation, you will be happy with what ever smoker route you choose.

And . . . what works great for someone else may not work at all for you and vice versa.

That's my $.02USD anyway and I'm a stickin' to it! :smile:

Smokin Gator
03-30-2007, 10:20 PM
I get the idea of indirect heat, the addition of smoke, and the ability to control temperature. Is that all there is to it? If you can control those variable does it matter what type of smoker you use??? Thanks. Scott

Very well asked... and basically yes that is all there is too it and yes if you can control those variables that is all there is to it. Sounds so simple... that is why I haven't mastered it all yet!!!

Yakfishingfool
03-31-2007, 07:41 AM
Alot of you guys know I have the Klose BYC, and a wsm. I find myself using the WSM for small cooks frequently and it's almost like autopilot. Now mostly I just cook fatties and Butts on it. I love the look of my Klose but was really trying to learn more about the box smokers Spicewine makes. I like the idea of reducing dimensional size. I like the idea of getting some personalization done to it. What I was confused about was the cooking style required to manage the box vs the offset. Thanks for the input. Scott