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dcimike125
12-20-2017, 06:13 PM
I plan on smoking a 9 lb Boneless prime rib on Christmas. At first, I was going to do it on the PBC but now leaning towards the OKJ Highland. My thought is that by putting it onto a standard broiler pan in the OKJ, I could retain the juices.

Yes/No/Maybe???

Gato Gordo
12-20-2017, 07:31 PM
I am planning on doing a 16 1/2 pound bone-in rib roast for Christmas. While doing research, I came across an Amazing Ribs article on how to prepare the roast. You can find the article here:The Science Of Cooking Prime Rib, Tenderloin, And Other Beef Roasts (https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/beef-and-bison-recipes/science-cooking-prime-rib-tenderloin-and-other-beef-roasts)

He advises to not roast in the pan, but above it. Roasting it in the pan limits the air flow which reduces the temperature and causes the roast to cook unevenly.

FrugalQ
12-20-2017, 07:33 PM
I plan on smoking a 9 lb Boneless prime rib on Christmas. At first, I was going to do it on the PBC but now leaning towards the OKJ Highland. My thought is that by putting it onto a standard broiler pan in the OKJ, I could retain the juices.

Yes/No/Maybe???

No reason it wouldn’t work. If u have anything with less surface area(mesh grill pan or similar) I think would be better. That would be less surface contact and be better smoke penetration at the bottom as it passes by on your offset instead of just the top. I use one all the time to catch juices on pork tenderloins and tri tip on the low heat phase when I reverse sear. Then I can Add them to reductions and gastriques.

mowin
12-20-2017, 08:53 PM
It depends on what pit temp you plan on. I've done dozens of PR ranging from a pit temp of 225 to 300+

I normally cook at 225* to 250. I've cook them in a pan, on the grate, and with a pan under the grate. There is little if any drippings when cooking at temps below 250*.

The higher the temps, the more drippings you will get.
Also, when cooking at temps around 225*, the PR will be a even rare to med rare (if pulled at the proper temp) from end to end. The ends will be the same as the middle. The higher the pit temp, the more the ends will cook compared to the middle.

Cook
12-21-2017, 04:08 PM
It depends on what pit temp you plan on. I've done dozens of PR ranging from a pit temp of 225 to 300+

I normally cook at 225* to 250. I've cook them in a pan, on the grate, and with a pan under the grate. There is little if any drippings when cooking at temps below 250*.

The higher the temps, the more drippings you will get.
Also, when cooking at temps around 225*, the PR will be a even rare to med rare (if pulled at the proper temp) from end to end. The ends will be the same as the middle. The higher the pit temp, the more the ends will cook compared to the middle.

Very good information. From someone who has cooked thousands of rib loins...I fully agree with the guy who has cooked dozens.

You won't get much in the way of drippings if cooked at a lower temperature (and I like cooking at a lower temperature). As stated, that will give you even color edge-to-edge & end-to-end.

If you want to get a few cuts that are more done than the others, bump the cooking temp up to above 300*. A couple of end cuts from either end will give you more done steaks while the middle cuts will be more rare. The color will not be edge-to-edge the higher the temp goes...you'll end up with a grey ring around the perimeter that is slightly more done than the "eye".

You can't really go wrong either way...it's all personal preference.