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View Full Version : Want to up my Jamaican Jerk game


wahoowad
12-10-2017, 12:10 PM
I've had an itch that I just can't scratch for some good jamaican jerk meat. I tried a rub my local supermarket offers but it was all heat and lacked flavor.

I do love me some jerked chicken but I'm primarily interested in developing a good method for pork and lamb. One of my next cooks will be a boneless lamb leg roast and I'd like to cook it low and slow Jamaican jerk flavored.

Any suggestions?

Macky
12-10-2017, 12:17 PM
Try "Woods" it's killer, authentic Jerk Seasoning! It has a lot of history behind it! Mac

wahoowad
12-10-2017, 12:20 PM
Do you mean this? Walkerswood Traditional Jamaican Jerk Seasoning? Is this a rub or some kind of wet paste? Can't tell.

Macky
12-10-2017, 12:25 PM
Do you mean this? Walkerswood Traditional Jamaican Jerk Seasoning? Is this a rub or some kind of wet paste? Can't tell.

http://www.walkerswood.com/product_traditional_jerk_seasoning.php

It's wet and wicked! Just use as much as you can stand! They may also have a rub but I only use the wet stuff! Read the website info as there's a lot of good products to be had!

ssv3
12-10-2017, 12:25 PM
Oakridge BBQ Jah Love. Walkerswood is also great stuff and was using WW until I tried Jah Love.

Stingerhook
12-10-2017, 12:26 PM
Here is a recipe we use at the house. It's good to have a wife from the island. Control your heat with the amount of peppers.
6T vegetable oil- ¼ C fresh lime juice- 4 scallions, coarsely chopped- 4 Scotch bonnet or habanero peppers, stemmed and seeded, coarsely chopped- 3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped- 2T fresh thyme- 1t minced peeled fresh ginger- 1T packed dark brown sugar- 2t allspice berries- 1t kosher salt- 1/4t ground black pepper- 2T white vinegar
Puree 4T oil and the next 10 ingredients until smooth
Take 1/4C and wisk in a small bowl with balance of oil and vinegar plus more salt to taste and refrigerate for glaze later

Macky
12-10-2017, 12:35 PM
Here is a recipe we use at the house. It's good to have a wife from the island. Control your heat with the amount of peppers.
6T vegetable oil- ¼ C fresh lime juice- 4 scallions, coarsely chopped- 4 Scotch bonnet or habanero peppers, stemmed and seeded, coarsely chopped- 3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped- 2T fresh thyme- 1t minced peeled fresh ginger- 1T packed dark brown sugar- 2t allspice berries- 1t kosher salt- 1/4t ground black pepper- 2T white vinegar
Puree 4T oil and the next 10 ingredients until smooth
Take 1/4C and wisk in a small bowl with balance of oil and vinegar plus more salt to taste and refrigerate for glaze later

THIS - but only for the hard core! Marty happens to be one! Mac

wahoowad
12-10-2017, 12:45 PM
I've never used a wet rub/marinade on a low and slow cook before. Should I only use it for faster cooks? Will the sugars in the marinade burn or darken up too much? I am just not sure to expect if I use it on pork or lamb roast that need to go 4 or more hours.

zippy12
12-10-2017, 12:47 PM
I have not has walkerwoods.. I will try it next, but Grace makes a very nice wet jerk ... The hot is HOT

wahoowad
12-10-2017, 12:48 PM
So hot hot is not what I want as the wife can't handle it. I like spicy food but can also be happy with medium heat. I see the Walkerswood product also offers a mild so I might start with that.

zippy12
12-10-2017, 12:52 PM
So hot hot is not what I want as the wife can't handle it. I like spicy food but can also be happy with medium heat. I see the Walkerswood product also offers a mild so I might start with that.

Grace has a mild

LYU370
12-10-2017, 01:05 PM
Walkerswood is what I usually use. Oakridge is pretty good as well. Phrasty posted a couple authentic Jerk recipes:

https://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=36577
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=105419


Here's another I have bookmarked, but haven't them yet. http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=120376

robert-r
12-10-2017, 02:23 PM
Walkerswood mild is very mild - you might try mixing the mild & hot & spicy.

Macky
12-10-2017, 02:36 PM
Walkerswood mild is very mild - you might try mixing the mild & hot & spicy.

I like this idea!

Cook
12-10-2017, 02:41 PM
Take the WW regular and season a few pieces of chicken...easy & cheap to experiment with. Smoke or just cook in the oven...hey, it's an experiment. Using chicken pieces will also allow you to test differing amounts. Season a couple of pieces with what you think it takes (that's going to be way more than you actually need). Then a couple of pieces with what you think is a ludicrously light amount (just barely enough to touch the skin). Then a couple of pieces with something in the middle.

WW can overpower quick...doesn't even taste that great to me.

You can also use a dry seasoning instead of the wet paste. Google some dry jerk recipes. See what ingredients they all have in common and what you like otherwise. Put something together of your own. That's what I've done. My dry jerk isn't spicy for the most part (it could stand to be because we don't mind the heat...my better half is from the southern Caribbean), but make some awfully fine jerk pork. I slice a pork butt into 1"-2" slices to get more surface area before I season...that makes it easy to cube up once done.

Lomey
12-10-2017, 02:41 PM
Walkerswood paste rub is what I use. It's got nice heat, but not overpowering. I mix it with a little olive oil and rub it on in a zip lock bag. Never had an issue with it burning.

SMetroHawkeye
12-10-2017, 04:56 PM
I roll the same way as Lomey - WW with olive oil. Only used it for chicken, and I like it. But it’s probably fool proof for the pork and lamb. I’m interested in trying some of the other recipes recommended!

sudsandswine
12-10-2017, 06:43 PM
I have used Walkerswood "seasoning" (the paste) for a long time but recently tried Oakridge BBQ Jah Love and liked it a lot too. Can't go wrong with either. The nice thing about Jah Love is I can keep it in the panty longer than I can keep a bottle of WW in the fridge (though I suspect no life form could grow in the WW Hot lol)

wahoowad
12-16-2017, 10:52 AM
Thanks for all the help and suggestions! My Walkerswood order arrived and I have a lamb roast lathered up with a 50:50 mixture of the spicy and mild. It will go on the WSM in a few hours and hopefully ready by dinner time. Really excited for supper �� !!! I'm also gonna chunk up some root vegetables and let them cook down the last couple hours of the lamb.

Ylouder
12-16-2017, 12:28 PM
I've been to Jamaica numerous times and have tried a half dozen want to be jamcian jerk spice blends. Always disappointed.

Order walkerswood on amazon, it's the real deal directly from Jamaica.

I will give a distant 2nd place runner up to Buffalo Wild Wings jerk sauce. It's not authentic but I sometimes use it on nuggets or sandwiches when I don't have time to let something marainate overnight and fire up the grill.

One Drop
12-17-2017, 04:37 AM
I've made my own marinade with various authentic recipes, and it has never topped Walkerswood, it's just been a bit different.

The only way to get the authentic flavour of jamaican Jerk is go for a very long marinade time, at least 24 hours and up to a few days if possible, even for poultry (make sure you get the paste under the skin as well).

The other thing I do is make a nest of green bay leaves and soaked allspice (pimento) berries and lay the meat on this for a smoke high over embers or if that's not possible, I put the bay leaves and berries in a foil packet or right on the coals and do it in a kettle or in my WSM. This last touch makes a huge difference in the final result, whichever way you go. Personally I've had better results doing jerk this way, covered with a sheet of corrugated metal, high over burning embers or coals with wood chunks than in a smoker, because I can't get as much of the moisture and oils from the bay leaves and pimento berries in a proper smoker.

One more thing, if you are doing your own paste and want the traditional look, you will need browning sauce or a substitute to make it dark enough. In JA they use browning sauce a lot, you should be able to find it fairly easily depending where you live.

I know it's very personal, but my experience with Grace jerk paste is that it's all heat and very little aromatic flavour, I really don't like it at all. I've never tried the mild variety.

Here is the final recipe I ended up using myself when making jerk pork and chicken, very similar the the excellent one above :

- 6 Scotch Bonnet Peppers, whole (you can seed them if you want it milder, and you can substitue a part of them with milder peppers, but you need Scotch Bonnet or Habaneros in there for the authentic flavour)
- 6 scallions
- 1 knob fresh ginger
- 6 cloves garlic
- 2 TBSP fresh thyme leaves
- 1 TBSP ground Allspice (Pimento in JA)
- 1 tsp. ground nutmeg
- 2 TBSP brown sugar (no more than this, jerk is never sweet!)
- ½ cup browning sauce or substitute
- 2 TPSP zest of lime
- ¼ cup lime juice (about 4 limes)
- 2 tsp. ground black pepper
- 2 tsp. white vinegar
- oil to thicken

I save some back and add vinegar and water to make a mild runny sauce for those who want a bit of sauce without making it spicier, because this recipe is pretty hot as is. I also serve a proper fresh hot pepper sauce on the side for veteran jerk fans.

Coconut milk rice and peas (using pigeon peas, not kindness beans) on the side and some mango salad and you might as well be in Port Antonio!

wahoowad
12-17-2017, 07:05 AM
Unfortunately I wasn't impressed with the outcome of my lamb roast. I mixed the Walkerswood seasonings 50:50 between their spicy and mild bottles - it was still surprisingly spicy.

I did a little taste test of the finished sauce off the cutting knife while I was slicing...maybe I got a dab of just the spicy part but it over-powered my taste buds and lingered as I was eating such that I couldn't tell how well the seasoning and smoke enhanced the meat.

I also do not really know what true jerk should taste like. I have this vague notion that, so far, none of the products I tried matches. My only experience was some jerk chicken that a true native Jamaican islander made at my house right before a 2' snowstorm caused a multiday power outage. He was here on business and I advised him to come stay with us as this snowstorm was about to hit and his current rental house was ill-equipped to see him through the storm. He baked the most delicious pan of jerk chicken before the power went out and we ate on it for 3 or 4 days straight. It was spicy, salty, sweet, savory, smoky and different but delicious all at the same time.

So the hunt continues...I'll have to explore some of these recipes, and also try to contact him again.

Smoked on the WSM to 135, then final sear

https://i.imgur.com/ExkBKNzh.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/uS3iV9vh.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/6i1J3uzh.jpg

Cook
12-17-2017, 08:00 AM
WW can overpower quick...doesn't even taste that great to me.

Unfortunately I wasn't impressed with the outcome of my lamb roast. I mixed the Walkerswood seasonings 50:50 between their spicy and mild bottles - it was still surprisingly spicy.

When I saw your pre-cook pictures of the lamb I immediately thought that it was way too much of the WW. I'm not lying when I say it is very overpowering. I personally don't like it...but my wife is a Carib, and we (she) has her own personal taste.

With that said, I do have WW in my pantry. IF I ever use it, I blend it in with other seasonings...and I only use a very little amount. I use it more as a seasoning instead of an ingredient (if that makes any sense). In other words...I only use a VERY little amount.

One Drop
12-17-2017, 11:47 AM
Unfortunately I wasn't impressed with the outcome of my lamb roast. I mixed the Walkerswood seasonings 50:50 between their spicy and mild bottles - it was still surprisingly spicy.

I did a little taste test of the finished sauce off the cutting knife while I was slicing...maybe I got a dab of just the spicy part but it over-powered my taste buds and lingered as I was eating such that I couldn't tell how well the seasoning and smoke enhanced the meat.

I also do not really know what true jerk should taste like. I have this vague notion that, so far, none of the products I tried matches. My only experience was some jerk chicken that a true native Jamaican islander made at my house right before a 2' snowstorm caused a multiday power outage. He was here on business and I advised him to come stay with us as this snowstorm was about to hit and his current rental house was ill-equipped to see him through the storm. He baked the most delicious pan of jerk chicken before the power went out and we ate on it for 3 or 4 days straight. It was spicy, salty, sweet, savory, smoky and different but delicious all at the same time.

So the hunt continues...I'll have to explore some of these recipes, and also try to contact him again.

Smoked on the WSM to 135, then final sear

https://i.imgur.com/ExkBKNzh.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/uS3iV9vh.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/6i1J3uzh.jpg


I think you'll have better results using at is it's supposed to be used, as a deep marinade before slow cooking to doneness.

Half of the taste and experience of jerk is the texture of the meat, similar to what happens when you marinate lamb or chicken in Tandoori paste, it becomes finer grained and slightly 'cooked' due to the lime penetrating the meat. Typically you would cut pork into fat strips rather than doe a whole butt or a big roast cut, so the marinade can get to the center of each piece.

As I mentioned, you need the aromatics of the bay leaves and pimento berries to round out the rather dry and spice-oriented flavours, you have to leave behind the idea of a sweet rounded marinade, it's nothing like most typical American rubs.

It should be very spicy, too, thats part of the experience. It's just one of those recipes that falls apart if you try to leave out any of the main elements or to adapt it to what you are used to (hint, it is hard to adapt to anything but what it is).

I would say if you found WW too hot, is to use a lot less of your own paste that you make following one of the recipes., while substituting some jalapeños or another milder chili for some of the Scotch Bonnets, and make sure you seed and devein them first (with gloves!)

Good luck, hope you have some fun experimenting and find a recipe you like! Maybe try it on a chicken next time, you'll get a better idea of the target flavour and texture. Just give it two to three days in the marinade in the fridge.

Listen to the lady, OR ELSE!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBFwn3BZWRg

Traditional covered method on top of pimento logs, over the eventually burnt down pimento logs and 'sweet wood', AKA Laurel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWBYrynIYos