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brdbbq
12-05-2017, 06:08 PM
11 lb pork belly

Lomey
12-05-2017, 06:16 PM
Good luck! Update during the process.

IamMadMan
12-05-2017, 06:24 PM
Keep us posted....

brdbbq
12-05-2017, 08:45 PM
2-3 LBS pork Belly
1/2 Cup Sugar (cane, Brown or coconut )
1 tbs Honey,or Maple syrup or Agave Nectar
2 tsb Sea Salt
2 tsp Smoked Paprika
1 tsp curing salt (pink salt) Prague #1
1 tsp Coarse Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1-2 tbs Apple Juice

Sriracha Lime infusion

Apply to belly vac seal marinate 7 days massage daily. Rinse then smoke till 150* IT. put in fridge for a day slice fry enjoy.

My first time and no condom....:drama:

IamMadMan
12-06-2017, 03:58 AM
2-3 LBS pork Belly
1/2 Cup Sugar (cane, Brown or coconut )
1 tbs Honey,or Maple syrup or Agave Nectar
2 tsb Sea Salt
2 tsp Smoked Paprika
1 tsp curing salt (pink salt) Prague #1
1 tsp Coarse Black Pepper
1 tsp White Pepper
1-2 tbs Apple Juice

Sriracha Lime infusion

Apply to belly vac seal marinate 7 days massage daily. Rinse then smoke till 150* IT. put in fridge for a day slice fry enjoy.

My first time and no condom....:drama:

I'm not finding fault with your bacon recipe, but if I were following this recipe for myself, I would have concerns about the amount of Cure #1 used. A single teaspoon of cure #1 is enough to cure 5 pounds of meat, you reference 2-3 pounds giving an average of 2.5 pounds of meat. Thus according to your post you are using twice the amount of cure required.

I would also be concerned with the amount of sugar vs the amount of salt at a 4.5 parts sugar to 1 part salt ratio (9 tablespoons of sugars vs 2 tablespoons of salt).

Salt is necessary to cure the meat. Salt helps to pull the moisture from the cells and dissolves the salt mixture and them distributes it back into the cell structure of the meat. So having the proper amount of salt is also critical.

While sugar is used to cut the sharpness of the salt in a cure, but your recipe is basically almost all sugar when compared to the other ingredients. Keep in mind that a lot of sugar can interfere with salt absorption and slow down the curing process.

I also highly advocate the use of a scale to weigh your ingredients according to the weight of the meat.

When curing, the items should be weighed (not measured) for accuracy, consistency, and food safety. Using the metric mode is much more accurate.

When making bacon use the following dry-cure ratios...

Cure #1 - the ratio is 0.25% (Multiplier .0025)
Salt - the ratio is 3% (Multiplier .03)
Sugar - the ratio is 1.25% (Multiplier .0125)

Weigh the pork belly in grams, record the weight and multiply using the above Multiplier to get the exact ratio for each ingredient.

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 06:18 AM
I'm not finding fault with your bacon recipe, but if I were following this recipe for myself, I would have concerns about the amount of Cure #1 used. A single teaspoon of cure #1 is enough to cure 5 pounds of meat, you reference 2-3 pounds giving an average of 2.5 pounds of meat. Thus according to your post you are using twice the amount of cure required.

I would also be concerned with the amount of sugar vs the amount of salt at a 4.5 parts sugar to 1 part salt ratio (9 tablespoons of sugars vs 2 tablespoons of salt).

Salt is necessary to cure the meat. Salt helps to pull the moisture from the cells and dissolves the salt mixture and them distributes it back into the cell structure of the meat. So having the proper amount of salt is also critical.

While sugar is used to cut the sharpness of the salt in a cure, but your recipe is basically almost all sugar when compared to the other ingredients.

I also highly advocate the use of a scale to weigh your ingredients according to the weight of the meat.

When curing, the items should be weighed (not measured) for accuracy, consistency, and food safety. Using the metric mode is much more accurate.

When making bacon use the following dry-cure ratios...

Cure #1 - the ratio is 0.25% (Multiplier .0025)
Salt - the ratio is 3% (Multiplier .03)
Sugar - the ratio is 1.25% (Multiplier .0125)

Weigh the pork belly in grams, record the weight and multiply using the above Multiplier to get the exact ratio for each ingredient.

That's why I posted it. I read the prague powder label after reading the recipe. Things didn't add up. And total agree on metric scale. More Better

LordRiffenstein
12-06-2017, 06:44 AM
I could be wrong but I've always understood that using Cure#1 when hot smoking bacon is used to retain a nice red color and not necessary for the curing of the meat.

That said, the ratios that MadMan posted are what I use myself.

Kimo1
12-06-2017, 09:24 AM
Second on too much Prague #1. With 2.5# of belly you would only need 0.5 tsp (2.4 grams) which will give you around 125 ppm (100 being minimum and 200 maximum). Also, if the belly is an inch thick you should only need to cure 1.5 - 2.5 days. If it's 2 inches thick 5 - 7 days.

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 10:05 AM
Second on too much Prague #1. With 2.5# of belly you would only need 0.5 tsp (2.4 grams) which will give you around 125 ppm (100 being minimum and 200 maximum). Also, if the belly is an inch thick you should only need to cure 1.5 - 2.5 days. If it's 2 inches thick 5 - 7 days.

How do you it has cured enough ?

Jrogers84
12-06-2017, 10:36 AM
How do you it has cured enough ?

Day per 1/4 inch from the middle.

HumboldtSmokeBBQ
12-06-2017, 10:40 AM
Wow, I seriously learned alot in 10 posts on this thread.

airedale
12-06-2017, 11:20 AM
I could be wrong but I've always understood that using Cure#1 when hot smoking bacon is used to retain a nice red color and not necessary for the curing of the meat. ... You are wrong, actually.

Day per 1/4 inch from the middle.Be a little careful with that. First, it assumes that the cure is diffusing from both sides of the meat. That will not be the case if there is skin on one side.

Also, it doesn't always work. I recently had a piece of "picnic" pork that was about 2 1/2" inches thick with both sides exposed and after 11 days I still found a little uncured meat in the center. The 1/4" rule would have predicted that 5 days was adequate. I'm not sure what happened but I do know that curing the meat longer has no downside, while being in a hurry does. I typically do 7-9 days for pork bellies with both sides exposed and have never had a problem.

IamMadMan
12-06-2017, 11:57 AM
I could be wrong but I've always understood that using Cure#1 when hot smoking bacon is used to retain a nice red color and not necessary for the curing of the meat.

That said, the ratios that MadMan posted are what I use myself.

I know many areas of Europe have unsmoked bacon (IE UK - Rashers, Germany - Bauchspeck, durchwachsener, Schinkenspeck) and is used for flavor in cooking.

After a recent trip to Europe, I realize your food purity laws are also something we could only wish for here in the US. It's a shame what we as American consumers have settled for. However the reason for the cure is two-fold...

1) Because of the extend time in refrigeration (7-10 days) cure #1 is used to prevent spoilage. Our store bought meats are trucked across country from processor, to warehouse, and then to store distribution, and our meat products are not as fresh as yours.

2) Because when smoking bacon, we usually smoke at a lower temperature gradually raising the smoker temperature over time to reach the finishing temperature of the bacon. The time in the smoker would allow the meat to be in the "danger zone" for 4 hours or more. I cold smoke my bacon for a minimum of 6 hours before applying heat, and many of us never exceed an IT of 125°.

.

bonz50
12-06-2017, 01:04 PM
great thread!!!!! I've been wanting to do my own bacon for some time but I lack facilities and size for the process, but that is coming soon.

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 01:07 PM
Day per 1/4 inch from the middle.

Measure vac packed or free state ? Kidding :becky:

VanderLaan
12-06-2017, 03:05 PM
Wow, I seriously learned alot in 10 posts on this thread.

You and me, both.

Just butchered a hog and making bacon with the belly and jowls is on my to-do list. Is there a seminal thread on making bacon? Something akin to the UDS thread? If so, could someone point me to it?

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 03:51 PM
rubbed,sealed,soaking

MisterChrister
12-06-2017, 04:07 PM
.... Is there a seminal thread on making bacon? Something akin to the UDS thread? If so, could someone point me to it?

This is my post from previous threads, just copied and pasted here. Ignore the part about it being for buckboard bacon (and how to cut the shoulder for buckboard, etc), and the rest is completely the same for belly bacon.

HERE'S A WRITE-UP I DID FOR ANOTHER FELLA, JUST COPIED/PASTED HERE:

For your first bacon, I'd recommend starting with buckboard bacon (just pork butt). It's a cheap way to break the ice and build confidence! The taste is identical, and you end up with a 3:1 meat to fat ratio instead of the inverse with belly. Don't get me wrong, I LOVE fatty belly bacon, but I find a lot of pleasure in the thrift of curing and sausage making, and buckboard yields much better at roughly 1/3 of the cost! Occasionally, you'll read a comment that buckboard tastes more hammy than bacony, but those folks 1) didn't smoke long enough, and usually tried smoking it as one big hunk; or 2) Warm smoked instead of cold smoking it which provides a much more robust smokey bacon flavor. Cold smoking is THE way to go for bacon in my not so humble opinion! Your smoking method and the following meat cutting step will take care of that.

Instead of curing a whole thick gnarly butt, I butterfly them open and cut in half while removing the bone. Here's how:
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/a/b...uckboard-bacon (except go ahead and separate the two halves completely). This way you end up with 2 slabs that are roughly the thickness of regular belly bacon for more even curing and better smoke penetration. An average 10# butt will yield 2 pieces at appx 4.4# after bone loss and slight "squaring" cuts. Make sure to remove the gray stinky gland meat from the edge of the butt, most meat packers don't. Stinky butt gland, HA!!!

I HIGHLY recommend an equilibrium dry cure. It leaves nothing to chance (i.e. ALL too common oversalting woes) the way a wet cure does, plus saves a lot of frig space. It's impossible to oversalt or under cure this way, plus in my opinion it just tastes better than a wet cured bacon. You'll need a digital meat scale (preferably that goes over 5#) and a digital jewelers scale that will read in increments of a gram for measuring the cure in the necessarily exacting amounts. You can get both on amazon for about $12-$15 each. The jewelers scale I got goes down to 0.01 grams which is more ideal with the small amounts of cure #1 than a .1g increment scale. Speaking of cure, make sure to keep it out of reach of kids and pets. It looks inviting like kool-aid/sugar mix in a bag (we called it "cocaine" and took it everywhere in our pockets as kids for our sugar fix lol, ghetto I know, it's where I grew up), but the cure is toxic when ingested in significant amounts straight from the bag.

Next, simply convert your meat weight to grams (1# = ~455g), then weigh out your salt (+/- 2.5% of your meat weight = meat grams x 0.025), your brown sugar (+/- 1% of your meat weight = meat grams x 0.01), and your cure (EXACTLY 1/4th of 1% of your meat weight = meat grams x 0.0025).

Example with your theoretical 4.4# slabs:
4.4# x 455g = 2002 grams meat weight (let's round to 2000g for easy math.

2000g x .025 = 50 grams salt (any brand plain kosher or plain non-iodized).
2000g x .01 = 20 grams brown sugar.
2000g x .0025 = 5 grams pink cure #1.

You'll weigh each of the two slabs and calculate/mix/cure separately, so it's an opportunity to play with adjusting your salt and sugar levels to find your preferred taste. Try and stay between 2%-3% salt, and .75%-1.25% brown sugar. Don't mess with the cure level, it will give you exactly 156ppm nitrite per USDA FSIS guidelines. You can also play around with adding other spices in each batch, but honestly I find that not much of the additional flavors actually penetrate the meat at the curing stage. If I want pepper bacon, I'll usually lightly oil or maple syrup paint the slabs right towards the END of the smoke (an hour or so remaining) and pepper crust it then. Some folks will oil or syrup coat it and stick spices on before smoking, BUT in my opinion, this greatly inhibits smoke absorption into the actual meat. In my experience, when this is done the smoke all sticks to the oil/syrup/spices barrier on the outside, making the exterior bitter and the interior boring.

Anywhoo, mix the 3 dry cure ingredients thoroughly in a bowl and apply it evenly to all sides of your meat inside of a 2.5 gallon ziploc (available at Walmart). Be sure all of the cure gets on the meat and into the bag. If your meat has been previously frozen or for whatever other reason doesn't look like it's wet enough to release enough liquid to dissolve all of the dry ingredients during the curing stage, you can add a LITTLE water to help get things moving along. Just make sure you add the water weight into the meat weight in grams for the purpose of calculating your cure ingredients. 1/4 cup should be more than enough, so just add 59 grams (1c H20 = 236g, 1/4c = 59g) to your meat weight when calculating. Squeeze the air out of the bag, seal it up, massage everything to spread it around equally, and place in frig for 5 days minimum, up to 10 days if your schedule is tight. I usually cure Friday night and remove from the cure the following Friday to prepare for a Saturday smoke. You'd go shorter or longer for thinner or super thick pieces, but 5-10 days is perfect for a 2"-3" thick piece of meat. An equilibrium cure can't over/under cure in this time period as it's exactly the correct amount of salt/sugar/cure that your meat can absorb based on meat weight and absorbency potential. Make SURE to gently massage the package and flip it over once a day to redistribute the fluids and cure for even curing. When it's cured, remove from the bag (the night before you'll smoke it), give a quick cold water rinse, thoroughly pat dry, and put it unwrapped on a wire rack in your frig overnight to dry the surface and form the shiny/tacky pellicle layer. This will help it absorb smoke evenly.


The next day, prep your smoker to run at very low temp (100-125 max at grate/meat level, if you can) with plenty of smoke wood chunks to provide clean, even, consistent smoke throughout a long "warm smoke". Make sure to keep your meat away from direct rising heat, so as to not cook it, you'll cook it later after you slice and pan-fry it. I've heard of some people taking their bacon to 150IT at the end of the smoke to make it edible without further cooking, but I've never tried that, it just doesn't appeal to me! I have a homemade version of a Cajun Bandit 22" kettle insert, but taller with 2 racks, that works perfect for bacon. I use an A-Maze-N Products AMNPS pellet maze resting on my sweeper fins all the way at the bottom of my kettle to generate the smoke, and a single row briquette snake method on the perimeter of the charcoal grate to generate JUST enough heat to achieve a low temp warm smoke and create a good draft. Then i hang my meat slabs from the top rack with a deflector on the bottom rack to shield the meat from rising and radiant heat. Plenty of folks successfully warm smoke bacon with just wood chunks over charcoal though, so whatever you do will work as long as you're providing consistent clean "thin blue" smoke and minimal heat to create draft. Good airflow is critical when cold/warm smoking, as a cooler smoker doesn't draft as well and can let the smoke stagnate and make your food bitter like an ashtray if you're not careful. The balancing act is having a little heat to create draft, but not so much that your food cooks before it takes on an ideal amount of smoke. Make sure to keep your smoker in the shade to help keep temps down this time of year. For bacon at cool/warm smoke temps, 8-12 hours is ideal. You'll also start to get a feel for how much smoke flavor the bacon will end up with based on the nice rich color on the meat during the middle/end of the smoking session. The nitrite in the cure will keep your meat safe for extended periods in this otherwise "danger zone". Another tip; I buy cheap bamboo skewers to put on my cooking grate to put meat on when cold smoking food that I can't hang. Just in case there's some bacteria lurking on my cooking grate and I won't be making it hot enough to kill the bacteria. Here's some good reading on cold vs hot smoking.
http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/1...-and-hot-smoke

When you're all done, let the meat rest at room temp to cool, then pat dry and seal it up tight in 2.5 gallon ziplocs (or vacuum sealer bags work great if you have a foodsaver) for 1-3 days in the frig to let the smoke and moisture equalize throughout the whole slabs. Then, just before slicing, pop the bags/slabs in your freezer for 30-60 minutes to firm up nice to make slicing easier. A meat slicer is ideal, but a sharp, long knife and a steady hand will do. Make sure to slice against/across the grain of the meat or it'll be chewy. Also, since shoulder is a much more worked part of the animal, buckboard bacon tends to have a LITTLE more toothiness to it. Not much, but enough that you don't want to slice it like a thick cut belly bacon, or the thick slices will be more of a chew than most people associate with bacon. Thin slicing will alleviate/eliminate that issue.

If you vacseal your portions, they'll keep good for +/- 6 months in the freezer. Otherwise, I'm thinking maybe a month or two in tight freezer wrap, but am not sure as I vacseal.

You'll notice some sections will be much fattier than others. The fatty sections will fry like normal bacon, the leaner sections will need 2-4 Tbsp of a light oil in the skillet to help get the frying action started.

IamMadMan
12-06-2017, 04:42 PM
You and me, both.

Just butchered a hog and making bacon with the belly and jowls is on my to-do list. Is there a seminal thread on making bacon? Something akin to the UDS thread? If so, could someone point me to it?


Here is an earlier post I did with culinary students..
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=246208

VanderLaan
12-06-2017, 06:35 PM
Apologies to the OP for hijacking this tasty, tasty thread. Say the word and I will start a new one.

sjb67
12-06-2017, 07:13 PM
I just put on a belly yesterday to cure used the equilibrium cure I found in another thread on here. It said 3% salt, 1% sugar and the cure #1 at .025 as stated above but made no reference to brown sugar or non iodized or kosher salt. I used plain sugar and regular iodized table salt. Did I goof ?

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 07:40 PM
yes I am Student. Fenugreek seed is on order

brdbbq
12-06-2017, 07:43 PM
Apologies to the OP for hijacking this tasty, tasty thread. Say the word and I will start a new one.

No problem I am a hijacker from the "old days"

jham0077
12-06-2017, 08:01 PM
http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/showthread.php?t=205412&highlight=Charcuterie

Nothing dedicated to bacon, but there is this.

mchar69
12-06-2017, 08:18 PM
I've done 7 days, no fewer. 2-3 days is too few.

IamMadMan
12-06-2017, 08:27 PM
I just put on a belly yesterday to cure used the equilibrium cure I found in another thread on here. It said 3% salt, 1% sugar and the cure #1 at .025 as stated above but made no reference to brown sugar or non iodized or kosher salt. I used plain sugar and regular iodized table salt. Did I goof ?

Only pure natural salts should be used in curing....

Iodized salt is a poor choice, it will work, but because of the anti-caking agents (sodium aluminosilicate). They can flatten and dull flavors of the finished product.

Also sodium aluminosilicate functions by adsorbing excess moisture and by coating particles thus making them water repellent. This can also slow the curing process or cause an uneven cure.

I found in another thread on here. It said 3% salt, 1% sugar and the cure #1 at .025 as stated above

Are you sure it was .025 ? it should be .25% which is .0025 as a multiplier....

sjb67
12-06-2017, 08:46 PM
Only pure natural salts should be used in curing....

Iodized salt is a poor choice, it will work, but because of the anti-caking agents (sodium aluminosilicate). They can flatten and dull flavors of the finished product.

Also sodium aluminosilicate functions by adsorbing excess moisture and by coating particles thus making them water repellent. This can also slow the curing process or cause an uneven cure.



Are you sure it was .025 ? it should be .25% which is .0025 as a multiplier....

That is correct I mistyped. I used 2.5g per kilogram well hopefully it will taste ok as I have 9# in the refrigerator. Chalk it up to learning. What about white sugar vs brown sugar? Thanks and sorry for hijacking

IamMadMan
12-06-2017, 08:54 PM
That is correct I mistyped. I used 2.5g per kilogram well hopefully it will taste ok as I have 9# in the refrigerator. Chalk it up to learning. What about white sugar vs brown sugar? Thanks and sorry for hijacking

It will taste fine, far superior to store bought bacon....

Regular sugar is ok, it's refined and it only imparts a little sweetness to cut the sharpness of the salt in the end. Brown Sugar or even Raw Sugar still carries some of the natural cane flavors, so it can impart some additional flavors. It's nothing to worry about, it's a matter of personal preference.

LordRiffenstein
12-07-2017, 06:29 AM
I know many areas of Europe have unsmoked bacon (IE UK - Rashers, Germany - Bauchspeck, durchwachsener, Schinkenspeck) and is used for flavor in cooking.

After a recent trip to Europe, I realize your food purity laws are also something we could only wish for here in the US. It's a shame what we as American consumers have settled for. However the reason for the cure is two-fold...

1) Because of the extend time in refrigeration (7-10 days) cure #1 is used to prevent spoilage. Our store bought meats are trucked across country from processor, to warehouse, and then to store distribution, and our meat products are not as fresh as yours.

2) Because when smoking bacon, we usually smoke at a lower temperature gradually raising the smoker temperature over time to reach the finishing temperature of the bacon. The time in the smoker would allow the meat to be in the "danger zone" for 4 hours or more. I cold smoke my bacon for a minimum of 6 hours before applying heat, and many of us never exceed an IT of 125°.

.

Thanks for this excellent info.

When I hot smoke bacon, I use my pellet grill on smoke until the IT is 150 F, usually done within 4 hours. I have yet to try cold smoking first but probably will have to give that a go VERY SOON!

IamMadMan
12-07-2017, 07:36 AM
Thanks for this excellent info.

When I hot smoke bacon, I use my pellet grill on smoke until the IT is 150 F, usually done within 4 hours. I have yet to try cold smoking first but probably will have to give that a go VERY SOON!

I use the A-Maze-N pellet tray, probably something similar you could make yourself there in Belgium...
https://www.amazenproducts.com/product_p/amnps5x8.htm

This produces large amounts of smoke without any heat, so there is no concern for condensation of smoke or creosote formation. It works well for cold smoking cheese, spice, fish, meat, virtually anything you want to add a smoke flavor to.

Cold smoking adds a deeper smoky flavor to the bacon. Taking it to a final internal temp of only 54° C / 130° F with heat over a long period of time, does not cook the bacon, but merely renders out some of the soft saturated fat. This helps to mildly firm the bacon and concentrate flavor. It makes slicing easier and leaves less melted fat in the pan when cooking.

brdbbq
12-07-2017, 03:01 PM
24 hrs in

IamMadMan
12-07-2017, 03:27 PM
looks good....

LordRiffenstein
12-08-2017, 06:20 AM
I use the A-Maze-N pellet tray, probably something similar you could make yourself there in Belgium...
https://www.amazenproducts.com/product_p/amnps5x8.htm

This produces large amounts of smoke without any heat, so there is no concern for condensation of smoke or creosote formation. It works well for cold smoking cheese, spice, fish, meat, virtually anything you want to add a smoke flavor to.

Cold smoking adds a deeper smoky flavor to the bacon. Taking it to a final internal temp of only 54° C / 130° F with heat over a long period of time, does not cook the bacon, but merely renders out some of the soft saturated fat. This helps to mildly firm the bacon and concentrate flavor. It makes slicing easier and leaves less melted fat in the pan when cooking.

I have a CSG so I will use that and then hot smoke it, thanks for the tips!

Kimo1
12-10-2017, 03:24 AM
I've done 7 days, no fewer. 2-3 days is too few.

Nothing wrong with 7. Just not needed.

brdbbq
12-14-2017, 10:29 AM
8 days in cure, received cold smoker this AM

IamMadMan
12-14-2017, 11:13 AM
8 days in cure, received cold smoker this AM

You don't have to buy their pellets, just use any pellet approved for smoking food. Traeger, Home Depot, and Lowes all sell pellets in the grill section.

DO NOT USE HEATING PELLETS for wood stoves, they use a petroleum based lubricant.

A full maze will burn about 8 - 11 hours.

brdbbq
12-14-2017, 11:23 AM
You don't have to buy their pellets, just use any pellet approved for smoking food. Traeger, Home Depot, and Lowes all sell pellets in the grill section.

DO NOT USE HEATING PELLETS for wood stoves, they use a petroleum based lubricant.

A full maze will burn about 8 - 11 hours.

pit boss apple on my kettle

HumboldtSmokeBBQ
12-14-2017, 11:25 AM
You don't have to buy their pellets, just use any pellet approved for smoking food. Traeger, Home Depot, and Lowes all sell pellets in the grill section.

DO NOT USE HEATING PELLETS for wood stoves, they use a petroleum based lubricant.

A full maze will burn about 8 - 11 hours.

So, you only use that maze thing with pellets? In other words, I could buy that maze thing, and put it in the bottom of my smoker, and just cold smoke that way for a handful of hours?

EdF
12-14-2017, 03:24 PM
That's what I've heard, and I plan to try it at some point.

brdbbq
12-14-2017, 03:28 PM
Tried in my Kettle just dirty smoke so lost again.

HumboldtSmokeBBQ
12-14-2017, 03:38 PM
Tired in my Kettle just dirty smoke so lost again.

dang. Sorry buddy.

IamMadMan
12-14-2017, 03:48 PM
Tired in my Kettle just dirty smoke so lost again.


Cold smoke from the A-Maze-N Pellet Smoker is going to be white smoke because there is no fire, there is no heat, so there is no condensation on the meat. Keep your vents wide open and let the smoke pass over the meat to impart a smoke flavor.

brdbbq
12-15-2017, 12:34 PM
Practice run

isuhunter
12-15-2017, 12:45 PM
I've tried the same method with the amazen pellet smoker and my taste like smoke. Way too smokey curious how long you did your cheese and bacon?

brdbbq
12-15-2017, 01:06 PM
I've tried the same method with the amazen pellet smoker and my taste like smoke. Way too smokey curious how long you did your cheese and bacon?

Cheese first then bacon first time for both

Bill-Chicago
12-15-2017, 02:24 PM
Would be great if you didn't stand on the wall while taking your pictures.

North is up river, we like sending y'all our treats!

brdbbq
12-15-2017, 03:14 PM
Was hanging from the rafter

JDM46
12-15-2017, 04:40 PM
Was hanging from the rafter

:laugh:

scp
12-15-2017, 07:16 PM
Cheese needs to held for a few weeks after cold smoking to let it mellow a bit...will be a bit bitter right after...I am no expert...just what I experienced. I vac seal...put in fridge and wait.

brdbbq
12-16-2017, 04:44 PM
Taste test on cheddar after 24 hrs.It will make ur pecker hard. Vac pack to rest

brdbbq
12-17-2017, 10:55 AM
Rinsed 24 hr air dry

brdbbq
12-17-2017, 12:12 PM
I've tried the same method with the amazen pellet smoker and my taste like smoke. Way too smokey curious how long you did your cheese and bacon?

3 hours for cheese

brdbbq
12-18-2017, 01:18 PM
71* For many hours I hope

brdbbq
12-20-2017, 03:11 PM
One rubbed one smoked and dinner

chilidog
01-07-2018, 04:32 PM
I use the amazin smoker tube to smoke cheese. I smoke for 6 to 8 hours with the Perfect mix pellets. It seems to do better if the grill is a little warmer than outside. If I do it at night when it is colder(35-40 degrees) it seems to be more bitter. I think you need little more heat in the smoker so the smoke rises and moves on out of the smoker. If I do it during the day just the extra heat from the sun shining on the black surface of the grill makes the difference. If I do it at night again I will probably try the snake method with a single line of charcoal. It doesn’t take much heat, just enough To make it warmer in the smoker than outside.

chilidog
01-07-2018, 08:29 PM
So I bought two pork bellies skin on. I did a good job of mangeling them, is there an easy way to get the skin off?

thirdeye
01-08-2018, 07:23 AM
Tried in my Kettle just dirty smoke so lost again.

I've found you need a large volume smoker or need spacers under the lid for maximum airflow when using a pellet smoke generator on delicate things like cheese or butter. I have one of the A-Maze-N sawdust tray style generators, and I think it's the best tool I've found for cheese, and for over 40 years I've tried a lot of different equipment. The smoke is so gentle I can go 6 or so hours, sampling along the way to dial in the smokiness. I do mellow my cheese for a couple of days before packaging and gifting it... but it's totally edible and not bitter at all.

IamMadMan
01-08-2018, 07:23 PM
So I bought two pork bellies skin on. I did a good job of mangeling them, is there an easy way to get the skin off?


If you are not good with a filet knife, cure and smoke the bellies with the skin on. When the IT reaches about 120 -125, just lightly peel the skin off. The saturated fats that bond the skin, will start to render which allows you to easily remove the skin.

chilidog
01-11-2018, 10:15 PM
I bought a small pork bellie to try my hand at bacon. Weighed 1040 grams. Using the multipler .0025 I come up with 2.4375 grams of pink cure #1. It is such a small number I convert it to grains so I can use a reloading powder scale. (Grams x 15.432 = grains) use 37.61 grains of cure along with 2.5 percent salt and 1 percent brown sugar. After 4 days there is very little liquid in the bag with the bellie. Did I do it correctly? Should there be more liquid?
The bellie is pretty thin, maybe an inch and a half at the thickest.

IamMadMan
01-12-2018, 05:41 AM
I bought a small pork bellie to try my hand at bacon. Weighed 1040 grams. Using the multipler .0025 I come up with 2.4375 grams of pink cure #1. It is such a small number I convert it to grains so I can use a reloading powder scale. (Grams x 15.432 = grains) use 37.61 grains of cure along with 2.5 percent salt and 1 percent brown sugar. After 4 days there is very little liquid in the bag with the bellie. Did I do it correctly? Should there be more liquid?
The bellie is pretty thin, maybe an inch and a half at the thickest.

Check your calculator.... You said "1040 X .0025 = 2.4375" - That would be the amount of cure if your belly weighed 975 grams.

1000 X .0025 actually equals 2.5

1040 X .0025 = 2.6

You should have used 2.6 grams of cure #1, however I don't think using 2/10 of a gram less is going to hurt anything as you can round up or down as most kitchen scales only register in 10th's of a gram and may have a tolerance value for a margin of error.

Liquid is not always present.

At an inch and a half thickness cure should be done in 4-5 days depending upon temperature. It will not hurt to leave for a week as it cannot "over cure" the meat.

If the skin is still attached, the curing time will be 7-10 day depending upon temperature. Again it won't hurt to go a few extra days with a dry cure application. Apply to meat side only, and Yes, you still turn the package daily.

brdbbq
01-12-2018, 06:43 AM
http://www.diggingdogfarm.com/page2.html

chilidog
01-12-2018, 06:50 AM
Thanks! I looked at the wrong one. I did two bellies and the 1040 gram one I used 2.6 so I did put the correct amount of cure. I just didn’t know if I did it the right way because there is very little liquid.

chilidog
01-12-2018, 07:33 AM
Thanks. I looked at my notes again and I did use 2.6 grams. I was just wondering if it was correct because of the lack of moisture.

chilidog
01-12-2018, 07:34 AM
Double post ....

brdbbq
01-12-2018, 08:21 AM
I started two more. Cure#1 Kosher salt maple sugar Fenugreek powder and black pepper

IamMadMan
01-12-2018, 09:33 PM
Thanks. I looked at my notes again and I did use 2.6 grams. I was just wondering if it was correct because of the lack of moisture.

Some will create a lot of moisture relatively quick, while other will only produce a small amount over a longer period of time.

You are on-track....

The seeds themselves can be bitter, so I leave them lightly crushed, but still whole. This way I and just rinse them away after the flavor is imparted. You may have found a way to get more flavor into the bacon. I never tried powdered fenugreek, let us know how that turns out.

brdbbq
01-13-2018, 08:02 AM
Some will create a lot of moisture relatively quick, while other will only produce a small amount over a longer period of time.

You are on-track....

The seeds themselves can be bitter, so I leave them lightly crushed, but still whole. This way I and just rinse them away after the flavor is imparted. You may have found a way to get more flavor into the bacon. I never tried powdered fenugreek, let us know how that turns out.

I could detect much flavor with the seed. I probably didn't get them cracked hard for old eyes to see. Have no idea what I am doing yet. But havin fun learning......:crazy:

brdbbq
01-19-2018, 03:30 PM
Rinse/ dry smoking Sunday or more

brdbbq
01-30-2018, 05:44 PM
Fenugreek powder worked mmm maple flavour

Norm
01-30-2018, 07:49 PM
Nice!

chilidog
02-13-2018, 09:13 PM
How much fenugreek and how much maple sugar did you use? I am about to try it.
Love the smoke color on yours! Bet it is great!

brdbbq
02-14-2018, 06:02 AM
1 tsp "Fenugreek powder" per/lb and maple sugar in EQ cure no syrup. Let me know outcome. I just started a butt sunday

chilidog
02-14-2018, 08:15 PM
Do you add anything else? Garlic or onion? The last batch I used cowgirls recipe and it is great. Thinking about switching the sugar with maple powder. I have fenugreek and might try it. Don’t know if I should keep adding the onion and garlic powder with maple and fenugreek.

brdbbq
02-15-2018, 10:00 AM
I used Maple Sugar and fenugreek Powder per "Iammadmans suggestion.

https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/seeds/fenugreek/powder.html?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&adpos=1o2&scid=scplp08289-01&sc_intid=08289-01&gclid=Cj0KCQiA2Y_UBRCGARIsALglqQ0831aQrFtpKsVkxwIR zEv5_0anYOuPTiUMi7ryli9YX3ayoeLXD8MaAloXEALw_wcB

Badjak
02-15-2018, 10:52 PM
Interesting thread...
My bacon is going in the cure today....

Just wondering, am I the only one that cold smokes totally?
Looks like everyone else brings up the temperature after cold smoking.
I don't.
Maybe that's the European in me coming out?

chilidog
02-15-2018, 10:57 PM
I cold smoked the last batch 13 hours. Kept it below 80 degrees

brdbbq
02-16-2018, 09:48 AM
I only cold smoke its just too easy

Badjak
02-16-2018, 10:53 PM
Glad to see there are some others.
Just really like the taste of cold smoked bacon :-D

brdbbq
02-17-2018, 07:44 AM
Why cook twice ?

chilidog
02-22-2018, 11:29 PM
My latest batch I took out of cure today. Bellie 1-1/2 inch thick cured with tender quick for 8 days, 1 tablespoon per pound. When I cut into it, it is blood red all of the meat part of the bacon. The other bellies I have cured are more of a dull red.
Is it ok? Do some bellies end up different colours?
The only difference this time I substituted powdered maple for brown sugar.

chilidog
02-22-2018, 11:52 PM
My wife says not blood red, bright pink....

thirdeye
02-23-2018, 07:04 AM
My latest batch I took out of cure today. Bellie 1-1/2 inch thick cured with tender quick for 8 days, 1 tablespoon per pound. When I cut into it, it is blood red all of the meat part of the bacon. The other bellies I have cured are more of a dull red.
Is it ok? Do some bellies end up different colours?
The only difference this time I substituted powdered maple for brown sugar.

My wife says not blood red, bright pink....


It was my understanding that color of cured meats was related to the interaction of the curing agent to the myoglobin, and that oxygen would have an influence. I'll see a change in the color between the different muscles you see in a slice of bacon, (or on the rib end of a buckboard loin), or the outer surface takes a different color. See how the upper stripe is darker than the lower stripes in this bacon.

https://i.imgur.com/NWihM4d.jpg

thirdeye
02-23-2018, 07:25 AM
Here is what I was talking about on the muscle groups on Buckboarded loin. This is the same loin, but the darker meat is from the rib end and the lighter slices are center cuts. There is even two shades of red in the rib end slices. I mention that on the labels of the packages to give away because at some point when slicing, a piece might just have a red arc across one end.

https://i.imgur.com/DCjVPNw.jpg

brdbbq
02-23-2018, 09:00 AM
My first butt out of cure Sunday my first loin out Sunday after. it been interesting and tasty.

chilidog
02-23-2018, 09:03 AM
I cured two pork bellies. One is dark pink and the other is a dull red like I am used to. If I miscounted and put too much tender quick on one would it make it a lot brighter red?
It is not the outside that’s bright pink but the inside. It looks normal until it is sliced. The inside is really red.

thirdeye
02-23-2018, 09:22 AM
I cured two pork bellies. One is dark pink and the other is a dull red like I am used to. If I miscounted and put too much tender quick on one would it make it a lot brighter red?
It is not the outside that’s bright pink but the inside. It looks normal until it is sliced. The inside is really red.

I don't think so, Tender Quick is pretty forgiving especially when compared to pink salt. I'm still thinking it's a characteristic of the interaction of the cure and the meat. I'm guessing every thing was overhauled (turned) during the cure, and you did NOT drain off any of the accumulated juices in the bag or container? And of course, you have no weird smells right?

chilidog
02-23-2018, 09:37 AM
I turned twice a day and it smells fine. Wife looked on tender quick web site and some of the pics were as red as mine so I guess we fry a piece and try it.
They weighed 6 pounds each so I put 3 tablespoons on each side. Hope I didn’t mess up and put 6 on one side!